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Beauty and The Panda

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About Beauty and The Panda

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    Actually Won Best Picture
  • Birthday October 6

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  1. I'm not joking that it's below my average.
  2. I got a 99.2 on one of my tests instead of a 100. I feel like a failure, that's way below my average for the class.
  3. Oh gosh, that's way too much. I thought 3-5 a year was a lot.
  4. Oh gosh, I thought you were in high school?
  5. There's a lot of non-personable people in economics. Not saying bad people, in fact all of them that I know are awesome people, but pretty awkward and not the first people you'd think of to talk about personal issues with. (Including myself in that description, but maybe take out the words awesome people when referring to that)
  6. Besides TFA, it's the movie I've seen the most in theaters.
  7. Number 18 El laberinto del fauno (Pan's Labyrinth) (2006) "But captain, to obey - just like that - for obedience's sake... without questioning... That's something only people like you do." Most Valuable Player: Guillermo Del Toro for Directing and the Screenplay Box Office: 37.6m (47.3m Adjusted) Tomatometer: 95% Notable Awards: Won 3 Oscars Synopsis: In the falangist Spain of 1944, the bookish young stepdaughter of a sadistic army officer escapes into an eerie but captivating fantasy world. Critic Opinion: "In "Pan's Labyrinth" writer-director Guillermo del Toro has crafted a masterpiece, a terrifying, visually wondrous fairy tale for adults that blends fantasy and gloomy drama into one of the most magical films to come along in years. The story centers on a bookish girl (Ivana Baquero) existing among the mythic monsters in her fertile fantasies and the more petrifying ones in her real life in 1944 fascist Spain. Living with her ailing mother (Ariadna Gil), evil stepfather (Sergei Lopez) and his compassionate housekeeper (Maribel Verdu), the girl steps into a netherland where the ancient satyr Pan (Doug Jones) gives her three tasks to complete so she can return to her true life as princess of the underworld. The images are visceral, surreal, bewildering, unnerving. The drama is passionate, profound, tragic, startling. It's a film of horrors and marvels, the tone ranging from savage atrocity to divine benevolence, the movie bursting with provocative ambiguity that provides the stuff of endless debate over the story's meaning and even its outcome." - David Germain, Associated Press User Opinion: "One of my favorite films ever. It is one of the most human films I've seen." - Noctis Reasoning: An absolutely mesmerizing movie, and the second greatest fantasy film of all time. Javier Navarrete's score is absolutely spellbinding and glues you into the film. The way it blends the atrocious acts of an officer from the Spanish Civil War, and the fantasy Labyrinth that parallels everything going on is near perfect. While I like most of Del Toro's films, and really like Devil's Backbone (it barely missed the list as well), this is a film that he truly found his stride on and created something special. The imagery is haunting, and it sticks with you. The movie is horrific, yet it also manages to come across as magical, in a sense. This is a movie that knows how to play a variety of tones and images and make everything mesh together in one perfect, human, fantasy film. Decade Count: 1930s: 12, 1940s: 14, 1950s: 19, 1960s: 24, 1970s: 27, 1980s: 36, 1990s: 34, 2000s: 32, 2010s: 31 Top 100 Decade Count: 1930s: 4, 1940s: 2, 1950s: 9, 1960s: 12, 1970s: 13, 1980s: 5, 1990s: 14, 2000s: 11, 2010s: 14 Top 50 Decade Count: 1930s: 3, 1940s: 1, 1950s: 5, 1960s: 3, 1970s: 8 1980s: 1, 1990s: 3, 2000s: 6, 2010s: 4 Top 25 Decade Count: 1950s: 1, 1960s: 1, 2000s: 4, 2010s: 2
  8. Number 19 The Searchers (1956) "That'll be the day." Most Valuable Player: John Ford's Direction Box Office: N/A Tomatometer: 100% Notable Awards: Won 1 Golden Globe Synopsis: An American Civil War veteran embarks on a journey to rescue his niece from the Comanches. Critic Opinion: "Ford's eye for composition was bold and sure. Consider the funeral early in the film, with a wagon at low right, a cluster of mourners in the middle left, then a diagonal up the hill to the grave, as they all sing Ford's favorite hymn, “Shall We Gather at the River” (he used it again in the wedding scene). Consider one of the most famous of all Ford shots, the search party in a valley as Indians ominously ride parallel to them, silhouetted against the sky. And the dramatic first sight of the adult Debbie, running down the side of a sand dune behind Ethan, who doesn't see her. The opening and closing shots, of Ethan arriving and leaving, framed in a doorway. The poignancy with which he stands alone at the door, one hand on the opposite elbow, forgotten for a moment after delivering Debbie home. These shots are among the treasures of the cinema." - Roger Ebert User Opinion: "Its twisted and self-reflective nuance about western genre is always remindful. Not just "great cowboys vs evil Indians" structure. John Wayne character is heroic protagonist yet kinda forerunner of Travis Bickle. When he was trying to kill his niece because she assimilated into Indians community, the movie became significantly interesting. As we know John Ford attempted many genres besides western, but certainly he made western films damn well." - bartonfinke Reasoning: I've seen criticisms of people calling this a racist movie, and I believe anyone who says that completely missed the point. A key theme in the Searchers is Ethan's, John Wayne's character, hatred for the Natives as he goes attempting "rescue" his niece who went too far in assimilating into the Comanche community. The movie creates a tragically flawed anti-hero with Wayne, and in a sense ushered a new era for Westerns, and pushed the genre to further moral complexity than it had ever been before. The Searchers is a rigorously entertaining Western and stands as one of John Ford's best films, but further than that, The Searchers is a movie that reflects back on common tropes of the Western genre, and strives to break them (even if subtly at points). The Searchers is a brilliant Western classic, boasted by one of Steiner's best scores, that was a heavy influence for movies from Taxi Driver, to The Wild Bunch, to Star Wars. Decade Count: 1930s: 12, 1940s: 14, 1950s: 19, 1960s: 24, 1970s: 27, 1980s: 36, 1990s: 34, 2000s: 31, 2010s: 31 Top 100 Decade Count: 1930s: 4, 1940s: 2, 1950s: 9, 1960s: 12, 1970s: 13, 1980s: 5, 1990s: 14, 2000s: 10, 2010s: 14 Top 50 Decade Count: 1930s: 3, 1940s: 1, 1950s: 5, 1960s: 3, 1970s: 8 1980s: 1, 1990s: 3, 2000s: 5, 2010s: 4 Top 25 Decade Count: 1950s: 1, 1960s: 1, 2000s: 3, 2010s: 2
  9. Funny you just now mentioned that... Number 20 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) "Open the pod bay doors, HAL." Most Valuable Player: Stanley Kubrick for Directing and Writing Box Office: 56.7m (374.5m Adjusted) Tomatometer: 94% Notable Awards: Won 1 Oscar Critic Opinion: "It’s not that 2001: A Space Odyssey doesn’t look dated—it does, a touch—but rather, it feels as intelligent and provocative as ever, bearing years of conceptual dreaming. Until today’s equivalent of novelist Arthur C. Clarke commits a hefty chunk of time to envisioning the beginning of human civilization, as well as the far ends of the future, there will be no new film that supplants it. Though it was showered with technical praise, 2001 lingers on the mind like a tall, black riddle: Where are the new bones, the new tools, that will take us higher? Do we even deserve them?" - Rothkopf, Time Out User Opinion: "Incredible film. Last 30 minutes of it is a total mindfuck. The visuals are decades ahead of their time." - redfirebird2008 Reasoning: One of the more polarizing classics on my list, people really either seem to love or hate this movie, and I'm obviously one of those that loves it. The original novel by Clarke is brilliant, and the movie is translated brilliantly by Kubrick. This is a movie that probably takes time for everyone to appreciate, I could understand the pretentious arguments, but I disagree, the movie plays out like a bold revelation for your to figure out. From the murderous and darkly hilarious HAL, to mindfuck of an ending, to the visual effects beyond its time, 2001: A Space Odyssey is the greatest space sci-fi of all time (I have three sci-fi's above this one, only one of which I'd say is true and strict sci-fi. The other two have sci-fi elements or are more fantasy). This is the best of the many Kubrick masterpieces. Decade Count: 1930s: 12, 1940s: 14, 1950s: 18, 1960s: 24, 1970s: 27, 1980s: 36, 1990s: 34, 2000s: 31, 2010s: 31 Top 100 Decade Count: 1930s: 4, 1940s: 2, 1950s: 8, 1960s: 12, 1970s: 13, 1980s: 5, 1990s: 14, 2000s: 10, 2010s: 14 Top 50 Decade Count: 1930s: 3, 1940s: 1, 1950s: 4, 1960s: 3, 1970s: 8 1980s: 1, 1990s: 3, 2000s: 5, 2010s: 4 Top 25 Decade Count: 1960s: 1, 2000s: 3, 2010s: 2
  10. Numbers 23, 22 and 21 The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (2001, 2002 and 2003) "My precious!" Most Valuable Player: Peter Jackson's Direction and J.R.R. Tolkien's Novels and Worldbuilding Box Office: 313.3m (471.2m Adjusted), 339.8m (495.6m Adjusted), 377m (532.3m Adjusted) Tomatometer: 91%, 96% and 95% Notable Awards: Won 17 Oscars between all three movies, including one Best Picture Synopsis: Follow the adventures of Bilbo Baggins, his nephew Frodo, and their valiant friends in Peter Jackson's award-winning adaptations of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic fantasy novels, which revolve around a magical, seductive ring with dark powers. Critic Opinion: "Released one per year for the last three years, Jackson's films have taken on more weight and created greater anticipation with each installment. The Fellowship Of The Ring proved that Jackson and his co-screenwriters, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, were more than capable of bringing Tolkien to the screen with an eye toward large-scale spectacle as well as a respect for the original story, characters, and themes. The Two Towers did it one better. Ratcheting up the intensity on every level, it took the series to the same place as Tolkien's books: the realm of shared cultural myth. Jackson doesn't buckle under the burden of winding it down with The Return Of The King, either; in fact, he lets the weightiness define the film." - Phipps, AV Club User Opinion: "I honestly can't split the movies. It's like asking for a favourite chapter in a book. The whole trilogy is a masterpiece." - Phil in the Blank Reasoning: Maybe it's cheating a little bit to list all of these in one post, instead of doing a post per movie, but I find the entire trilogy works as one long epic. I really can't split the films apart, because Fellowship is a great beginning but incomplete without the other two, imo. While, Two Towers is some fantastic meat and action sequences, but it'd be like starting on episode 5 of a TV show, it'd feel weird not to watch Fellowship first. And while Return of the King often gets knocked for its overly long endings, I find them fitting as they scale upwards, given its a conclusion meant to be watched after Two Towers. I don't have an actual favorite out of any of the movies, they all are fantastic and do justice to Tolkien's books. I don't think I need to talk too much on how great these movies are, I'd reckon everyone on these forums has already formed their opinions on them. Anyways, this is an epic trilogy that touches me personally and has been a favorite growing up, of course I had to include these. Also on a side note, the extended editions greatly enhance already excellent films. Decade Count: 1930s: 12, 1940s: 14, 1950s: 18, 1960s: 23, 1970s: 27, 1980s: 36, 1990s: 34, 2000s: 31, 2010s: 31 Top 100 Decade Count: 1930s: 4, 1940s: 2, 1950s: 8, 1960s: 11, 1970s: 13, 1980s: 5, 1990s: 14, 2000s: 10, 2010s: 14 Top 50 Decade Count: 1930s: 3, 1940s: 1, 1950s: 4, 1960s: 2, 1970s: 8 1980s: 1, 1990s: 3, 2000s: 5, 2010s: 4 Top 25 Decade Count: 2000s: 3, 2010s: 2
  11. Number 24 Gravity (2013) "You've got to learn to let go." Most Valuable Player: Alfonso Cuaron's Direction Box Office: 274.1m (284.9m Adjusted) Tomatometer: 96% Notable Awards: Won 7 Oscars, nominated for Best Picture Synopsis: Two astronauts work together to survive after an accident which leaves them alone in space. Critic Opinion: "Believe the hype: “Gravity” is as jaw-droppingly spectacular as you’ve heard — magnificent from a technical perspective but also a marvel of controlled acting and precise tone. This is not hyperbole: This is the best film I’ve seen so far this year. I seriously have no idea how Alfonso Cuaron made this movie. I mean, I have some idea, and it involves many, many talented people in front of many, many computers. But the fact that we genuinely feel like we’re watching George Clooney and Sandra Bullock in space — floating, tumbling, hurtling, clinging to each other for life — is just a mind-bogglingly impressive thing. We forget that these are A-list stars and become totally immersed in their characters’ struggle to survive." - Christy Lemire User Opinion: "It's easily the movie experience of the year. Absolutely insane; you will be gripping the seat of your IMAX chair for 90 minutes." - Telemachos Reasoning: I'm ranking Gravity as the best film of the decade, and it's because of the sheer experience you get from watching this movie, no matter what screen it's on. Sure, it's always a downgrade to watch this movie on a home screen instead of an IMAX screen, but the power in the film is never lost. The shots are absolutely breathtaking, it's one of the few times in my life where special and effects and excellent cinematography floored me to this kind of degree. While the story may be simple, it's an engaging one, and it leaves you gasping for air in how suspense this disaster sci-fi movie is. Gravity remains grounded, and it never feels like its too ambitious for its own good. It's a moving experience that really demonstrates how powerful pure visual filmmaking can be. There's plenty of thematic depth you can take out of the imagery, and it's a true cinematic experience. Decade Count: 1930s: 12, 1940s: 14, 1950s: 18, 1960s: 23, 1970s: 27, 1980s: 36, 1990s: 34, 2000s: 28, 2010s: 31 Top 100 Decade Count: 1930s: 4, 1940s: 2, 1950s: 8, 1960s: 11, 1970s: 13, 1980s: 5, 1990s: 14, 2000s: 7, 2010s: 14 Top 50 Decade Count: 1930s: 3, 1940s: 1, 1950s: 4, 1960s: 2, 1970s: 8 1980s: 1, 1990s: 3, 2000s: 2, 2010s: 4 Top 25 Decade Count: 2010s: 2
  12. Youre taking things a little to seriously.