Sunshine, Light, and Joy

 

This is a post that I've been thinking about for awhile. Recently, I opened up the discussion to other members of the staff to get their feelings on the matter, and their opinions generally matched mine, which is this:

Within the last year or so, there's been a steady increase of negative posts in movie threads. We've always had some heated discussions for some movies, but recently things have not only gotten more histrionic in those threads (generally speaking, the CBM ones), but they've started to spread to other franchises and other movies as well. I'm not talking about out-and-out trolling, I'm talking about members feeling they have to consistently shit on a movie (or studio, or star) simply because they aren't interested in the current project or projects. With every piece of news about a movie, it's now a virtual guarantee that there's a flood of people rushing to say they think it sucks, they don't like the current trailer/tv spot/actor/actress/director/concept. And I get it -- we all have movies we don't like, movies which we think are bad ideas, industry people that just don't appeal to us. But there's a fine line between expressing your opinion about this and doing it so often, with such consistency, that the collective emphasis of all of it basically brings down the entire thread and thus the entire forum.

There's no easy answer to this. We don't want to crush freedom of expression here. But at the same time, the spirit of this forum is for people to have fun talking about the movies they love and the box-office runs they love.

To have fun.

And while it may be fun -- in a sense -- to personally vent about a movie, or to vent at people who dare to enjoy something you don't, it doesn't bring fun to our community. In fact, it generally drags down the overall fun for everyone else. We've had people repeatedly mention to us over the last several months or so that in some cases they don't even bother going into some threads -- even for movies they're curious about! -- because they just don't want to deal with the overall mess those threads contain. And frankly, that matches the personal opinion of most of the staff as well.

So this post is both a request and a warning. 

The request: Next time you feel like taking a dump on a movie (or a topic) for the dozenth time, take a moment to consider whether it's really worth it. People probably already have a good idea of what your attitude about the project is. Maybe just put your posting energy into a movie that you enjoy and love or are excited about.

The warning: The staff is going to be taking a closer look at some of these threads and we'll be more active with temp thread-bans if we think it'll help the overall vibe of the forum. I'd rather we don't have to, but it's not going to constrain any of you too much if you aren't allowed to post about a movie you supposedly don't care about anyway.

Remember the words of Bill and Ted: "Be Excellent to Each Other".

They're just movies, guys. It's about having fun.

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John Marston

Batman (1989)

20 posts in this topic

this movie is the definition of an event movie. 

 

the movie seemed massively hyped ever since it was announced as a movie that would go back to the original way Batman was in comparison to the way he was portrayed in the 60s TV show. 

 

 

the summer was apparently the summer of "Batmania" 

 

 

 


 

Quote

 

In the months pre-dating Batman's release in June 1989, a popular culture phenomenon rose known as "Batmania".[42] Over $750 million worth of merchandise was sold.[31] Cult filmmaker and comic book writer Kevin Smith remembered: "That summer was huge. You couldn't turn around without seeing the Bat-Signal somewhere. People were cutting it into their fucking heads. It was just the summer of Batman and if you were a comic book fan it was pretty hot.

 

 

 

in the making of, they talk about people paying to see other movies just to see the trailer and then leaving when the trailer was over. Since there was no Internet then, I can see that. 

 

 

The movie has a listed budget of 35 million but it apparently went over budget to something like 48 million. 

 

The movie was of course gigantic. It broke the opening weekend record (just a week after Ghostbusters 2 broke the record) with   $40,489,746  which adjusts to  $88,220,700 and it finished with  $251,188,924  which adjusts to  $544,557,400. It was easily the highest grossing movie of the year domestically and beat Indiana Jones 3 for the domestic crown,  though worldwide Indy would win. 

 

 

Interestingly, history would repeat itself 19 years later with another Batman film with the Joker and arguably had even more hype and even did better than the 1989 film adjusted. It also went up against an Indiana Jones film and this time, Batman would win worldwide as well. 

 

 

Edited by John Marston
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Why yes, I do have fond memories of seeing this multiple times in theaters when I was 8.

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here's the only trailer that released for the movie and the one people paid for other movies just so they can see this trailer. 

 

 

 

 

it's a pretty bad trailer honestly. Just a bunch of randomly edited clips

 

 

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The teaser poster (the Bat logo) was very iconic. I don't know if they ever even did a regular poster. 

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is it terrible to admit when prince died the soundtrack for this is the first place i went? Scandalous is a legit one of his best slow jams.

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This was apparently the first movie to ever have both a song and a score album released.

Edited by ddddeeee

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5 hours ago, John Marston said:

here's the only trailer that released for the movie and the one people paid for other movies just so they can see this trailer. 

 

 

 

 

it's a pretty bad trailer honestly. Just a bunch of randomly edited clips

 

 

when i did film studies at uni we had to write an essay on a piece of movie marketing and i picked this trailer and wrote 2500 on why it was effective. was ages ago so i don't remember what i wrote but i did get a first on it so thank you batman. 

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Massive movie. I recall seeing it a couple of times that summer. Bought the Prince soundtrack as well. The black and yellow "batman" logo took over the culture, it was everywhere that year. To this day, you'll occasionally see a teenager wearing a t-shirt with it, it's now a 'vintage' thing. 

 

IIRC, Batman was the #3 movie of the 1980s in nominal dollars, behind only ET and Return of the Jedi (in its original 1983 run).  It also broke a kind of slump the movies had been in during the second half of the 80s, as it was the first film since Back to the Future four years earlier to crack the $200 million mark. 

 

What Batman didn't do was spawn the kind of huge comic book movie market we have today. The Batman sequels released in 1992 and 1995 were the only big comic book character movies of the 1990s, and they were both small potatoes compared to 1989's Batman.

 

 

Edited by SteveJaros

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So, what movie had the OW record before Last Crusade, Ghostbusters 2 and Batman broke it back to back to back in 1989?
 

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16 minutes ago, The Stingray said:

So, what movie had the OW record before Last Crusade, Ghostbusters 2 and Batman broke it back to back to back in 1989?
 

 

Beverly Hills Cop II

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Batman's opening weekend is the closest thing to maximum capacity we have ever seen. It increased 30% over the previous weekend, which was only 1 week old! That would be like TFA opened to $275m.

 

Batman was an enormous media monster. There are tons of old highlights from spring and summer 1989 with MTV, Entertainment Tonight, etc. In terms of free media buzz, this could be top dog. THE DARK KNIGHT received similar attention, but only because of Ledgers's death.

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14 minutes ago, excel1 said:

Batman's opening weekend is the closest thing to maximum capacity we have ever seen. It increased 30% over the previous weekend, which was only 1 week old! That would be like TFA opened to $275m.

 

Hmm wouldn't that honor go to ROTJ? It broke the previous OW record by over 60% (the highest percentage increase for any film that's held the record going back at least since Jaws in 1975) and still holds the record for highest adjusted theater average ($63,085) for any wide release in history. 

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35 minutes ago, Jiffy said:

 

Hmm wouldn't that honor go to ROTJ? It broke the previous OW record by over 60% (the highest percentage increase for any film that's held the record going back at least since Jaws in 1975) and still holds the record for highest adjusted theater average ($63,085) for any wide release in history. 

 

Sorry, I was referring to the modern era of film releases, which really didn't start until late 80s/early 90s. The 1980s and 1990s saw such crazy theater and screen growth that it makes comparisons difficult. 

 

For example, ROTJ was only in 1,002 theaters on opening weekend. Compared to 1,764 on weekend 12. Or the 2,200 Batman opened with. So the adjusted theater average is a bit skewed obviously, but in terms of wide releases, yes ROTJ is based on screens it used, but it's far more difficult to tell how it would have fared with a more mature screen count,

 

Temple of Doom broke ROTJs record only a year later, so its hard to claim ROTJ was max capacity. However, it did in 1,680 theaters vs. ROTJ. Beverley hills cop also opened, with 26m opening weekend despite opening on Thursday.

 

Batman opened everywhere and it took 7 years for a film to clearly have more admissions (Independence Day), and it did it with near 3,000 theaters. 

 

$43 million was unimaginable in 1989. Probably more so than a $100 million opening weekend was in 2002, a $200m ow weekend in 2012, etc.

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52 minutes ago, Jiffy said:

 

Hmm wouldn't that honor go to ROTJ? It broke the previous OW record by over 60% (the highest percentage increase for any film that's held the record going back at least since Jaws in 1975) and still holds the record for highest adjusted theater average ($63,085) for any wide release in history. 

 

Sorry, I was referring to the modern era of film releases, which really didn't start until late 80s/early 90s. The 1980s and 1990s saw such crazy theater and screen growth that it makes comparisons difficult. 

 

For example, ROTJ was only in 1,002 theaters on opening weekend. Compared to 1,764 on weekend 12. Or the 2,200 Batman opened with. So the adjusted theater average is a bit skewed obviously, but in terms of wide releases, yes ROTJ is based on screens it used, but it's far more difficult to tell how it would have fared with a more mature screen count,

 

Temple of Doom broke ROTJs record only a year later, so its hard to claim ROTJ was max capacity. However, it did in 1,680 theaters vs. ROTJ. Beverley hills cop also opened, with 26m opening weekend despite opening on Thursday.

 

Batman opened everywhere and it took 7 years for a film to clearly have more admissions (Independence Day), and it did it with near 3,000 theaters. 

 

$43 million was unimaginable in 1989. Probably more so than a $100 million opening weekend was in 2002, a $200m ow weekend in 2012, etc

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12 hours ago, excel1 said:

 

Sorry, I was referring to the modern era of film releases, which really didn't start until late 80s/early 90s. The 1980s and 1990s saw such crazy theater and screen growth that it makes comparisons difficult. 

 

For example, ROTJ was only in 1,002 theaters on opening weekend. Compared to 1,764 on weekend 12. Or the 2,200 Batman opened with. So the adjusted theater average is a bit skewed obviously, but in terms of wide releases, yes ROTJ is based on screens it used, but it's far more difficult to tell how it would have fared with a more mature screen count,

 

Temple of Doom broke ROTJs record only a year later, so its hard to claim ROTJ was max capacity. However, it did in 1,680 theaters vs. ROTJ. Beverley hills cop also opened, with 26m opening weekend despite opening on Thursday.

 

Batman opened everywhere and it took 7 years for a film to clearly have more admissions (Independence Day), and it did it with near 3,000 theaters. 

 

$43 million was unimaginable in 1989. Probably more so than a $100 million opening weekend was in 2002, a $200m ow weekend in 2012, etc

 

Yeah, those are valid points to consider, and I'd never presume to understate how huge Batman's opening was at the time. 

 

I was moreso referring to the percentage increase from record-holder to record-holder over the past few decades:

 

2015     The Force Awakens              $247,966,675     +18.8%

2015     Jurassic World                     $208,806,270     +0.7%

2012     The Avengers                      $207,438,708     +22.6%

2011     Deathly Hallows - Part 2       $169,189,427     +6.8%

2008     The Dark Knight                  $158,411,483     +4.8%

2007     Spider-Man 3                      $151,116,516     +11.4%

2006     Dead Man’s Chest                $135,634,554     +18.1%

2002     Spider-Man                         $114,844,116     +27.2%

2001     Harry Potter                        $90,294,621      +25.2%

1997     The Lost World                    $72,132,785      +36.7%

1995     Batman Forever                   $52,784,433      +12.2%

1993     Jurassic Park                       $47,026,828       +2.9%

1992     Batman Returns                   $45,687,711      +12.8%

1989     Batman                               $40,489,746      +37.4%

1989     Ghostbusters II                    $29,472,894      +0.4%

1989     The Last Crusade                 $29,355,021      +11.4%

1987     Beverly Hills Cop II               $26,348,555      +4.0%

1984     The Temple of Doom             $25,337,110      +10.1%

1983     Return of the Jedi                 $23,019,618      +60.4%

1982     Star Trek II                          $14,347,221       +1.7%

1981     Superman II                         $14,100,523      +18.2%

1979     Star Trek                              $11,926,421      +15.1%

1978     Superman (Week 3)              $10,363,384      +0.9%

1978     Every Which Way But Loose   $10,272,294      +1.0%

1978     Star Wars (Re-Issue)             $10,166,336      +3.0%

1978     Jaws 2                                 $9,866,023        +37.1%

1977     Star Wars (Week 11)             $7,195,573        +1.9%

1975     Jaws                                    $7,061,513

 

--

 

Or if you'd like to include preview amounts:

 

2015     The Force Awakens              $247,966,675     +18.8%

2015     Jurassic World                     $208,806,270     +0.7%

2012     The Avengers                      $207,438,708     +22.6%

2011     Deathly Hallows - Part 2       $169,189,427     +6.8%

2008     The Dark Knight                  $158,411,483     +4.8%

2007     Spider-Man 3                      $151,116,516     +11.4%

2006     Dead Man’s Chest                $135,634,554     +18.1%

2002     Spider-Man                         $114,844,116     +27.2%

2001     Harry Potter                        $90,294,621      +20.9%

1997     The Lost World                    $74,699,969      +41.5%

1995     Batman Forever                   $52,784,433      +12.2%

1993     Jurassic Park                       $50,159,460      +5.1%

1992     Batman Returns                   $47,720,711      +11.7%

1989     Batman                               $42,705,884      +44.9%

1989     Ghostbusters II                    $29,472,894      +0.4%

1989     The Last Crusade                 $29,355,021      +11.4%

1987     Beverly Hills Cop II               $26,348,555      +4.0%

1984     The Temple of Doom             $25,337,110      +10.1%

1983     Return of the Jedi                 $23,019,618      +60.4%

1982     Star Trek II                          $14,347,221       +1.7%

1981     Superman II                         $14,100,523      +18.2%

1979     Star Trek                              $11,926,421      +15.1%

1978     Superman (Week 3)              $10,363,384      +0.9%

1978     Every Which Way But Loose   $10,272,294      +1.0%

1978     Star Wars (Re-Issue)             $10,166,336      +3.0%

1978     Jaws 2                                 $9,866,023        +37.1%

1977     Star Wars (Week 11)             $7,195,573        +1.9%

1975     Jaws                                    $7,061,513

 

--

 

In either case, ROTJ broke the previous record by what is (by far) the largest margin of any film dating back since 1975. 

 

Its theater count would be equivalent to ~2,500 in today's climate, which is still fairly wide despite not reaching full saturation. 

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Posted (edited)

S

Edited by excel1
Fixing

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It might be the only film I remember seeing  opening night.  Which back then was Friday.  And then I saw it that Saturday and Sunday that same opening weekend.

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I love burtons Batman movies so much. I remember being a teenager and wearing the black shirt with the yellow logo making me feel so cool at the time.

I mean Nolan's The dark knight was so great but for me Burtons movies are so great i just love them, the atmosphere, the pinguin, i still remember when catwoman first appeared and her interactions with the pinguin.

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