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The Invisible Man | Feb 28 2020 | Will be available on VOD Friday March 20

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3 hours ago, Maggie said:

Actually, Moss elevates the movie. The film is not bad at all, but Moss' acting is way too good for it. She's a fantastic actress. Her acting is too good for the horror genre

 

Wow, that's a really shit comment.

 

Horror isn't a lesser genre, most of time, the most acclaimed, brilliant and inovative movies of year comes from the Horror zone, it is the genre that actually gives freedom to directors explores their darkest ideas. I much prefer seeing Moss exploring her talent in a movie like this, than in doing a lazy Oscar bait that will end up forgotten once that the Award Season is over. 

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6 minutes ago, The Horror of Lucas Films said:

 

Wow, that's a really shit comment.

 

Horror isn't a lesser genre, most of time, the most acclaimed, brilliant and inovative movies of year comes from the Horror zone, it is the genre that actually gives freedom to directors explores their darkest ideas. I much prefer seeing Moss exploring her talent in a movie like this, than in doing a lazy Oscar bait that will end up forgotten once that the Award Season is over. 

Sorry, i didn't mean it to come that way. Horror can be an excellent showcase for an actor talents. This movie and Toni Colette in Hereditary are prime examples of excellent acting in horror. It's just that many times horror movie are lazy with their casting or  great actors are avoiding the genre

Edited by Maggie
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2 hours ago, Valonqar said:

Horror is one of more creative genres. That's why I love it. Horror, fantasy, sci fi. So much to explore, so many places to go where you didn't think you could.

 

Yeah, like the Human Centipede 3...

 

I didn't think I could go there - neither I wanted to.

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Horror has been littered with a myriad of performances over the years that are award worthy...here's just a few of them, imo

 

 

Robert Englund NOES

Dee Wallace Cujo

Donald Pleasance Halloween

Robert DeNiro Angel Heart Mickey Rourke Angel Heart

Jeff Goldblum The Fly

Jack Nicholson The Shining

Rebecca Ferguson Dr. Sleep

Anthony Perkins Psycho

Bill Paxton Aliens

Naomi Watts The Ring

The three leads in Jaws

Matthew Lilliard Scream

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Yes, horror requires a lot from actors to both emote and get physical. Yet genre bias prevents awards from taking them as seriously as similar performance in a standard drama. Not cool. 

 

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17 minutes ago, Chucky said:

Performances in a horror are not subtle so really not as impressive or impactful as an actor nailing a drama. 

This is simply not true.

Every role is evaluable on the requirements of that role. If anything makes something more impressive or impactful it's dexterity of thought - which is down to the individual actor and how they work with the director, not the genre.

In addition to this, subtlety is not inherently better than boldness. Manchester by the Sea and Fences are two movies that due to the cultural backgrounds of the characters require performances to be delivered at differing scales - both feature outstanding performances - one is not inherently better than the other just because the characters in MBTS are more prone to hiding certain emotions.

Moss is as good in this film when she is proud of having got to the end of the street to pick up the post as she is when emoting heavily due to the stresses of the major action.

 

Horror is rammed with some of the best performances of the last 5 years. And of all time.

Edited by Ipickthiswhiterose
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If subtlety is the key to awards than why the biggest overacting/actressing/histrionics/plate-breaking wins much more than introspective acting? So argument that horror performances are not awards worthy cause they "lack subtlety" doesn't stand considering AMPAS preference for showy and unsubtle.:redcapes:

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2 minutes ago, Valonqar said:

If subtlety is the key to awards than why the biggest overacting/actressing/histrionics/plate-breaking wins much more than introspective acting? So argument that horror performances are not awards worthy cause they "lack subtlety" doesn't stand considering AMPAS preference for showy and unsubtle.

 

Indeed.

 

Hoffman winning the Oscar for Rain Man rather than Cruise is a good example. Both roles were equally integral to that film's success, and indeed Cruise played the character that actually changed over the course of the movie, but the less subtle "character" role won out. 

Edited by Ipickthiswhiterose
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1 hour ago, Ipickthiswhiterose said:

This is simply not true.

Every role is evaluable on the requirements of that role. If anything makes something more impressive or impactful it's dexterity of thought - which is down to the individual actor and how they work with the director, not the genre.

In addition to this, subtlety is not inherently better than boldness. Manchester by the Sea and Fences are two movies that due to the cultural backgrounds of the characters require performances to be delivered at differing scales - both feature outstanding performances - one is not inherently better than the other just because the characters in MBTS are more prone to hiding certain emotions.

Moss is as good in this film when she is proud of having got to the end of the street to pick up the post as she is when emoting heavily due to the stresses of the major action.

 

Horror is rammed with some of the best performances of the last 5 years. And of all time.

But acting frightened is just one of the basics. It seems everyone is jumping the gun because they like this actress, everyone seemed to be praising her before the film was released. Personally i was more impressed with the horror in Tom Hanks' face at the end of Captain Phillips than I was with the main actress in films like US or Hereditary.

 

You can say it's not true but it's just my opinion and I'm not seeing many oscar nominations for these movies so I'm clearly not alone here.

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Acting frightened is what got Toni Collette and that "I see dead people" kid their Oscar noms for 6th Sense while Bruce Willis's amazing, subtle work in the same movie was ignored.  So yes, there's subtlety in horror too cause at the end of the day, horror is drama only with more scares than your average "drama" genre. But what makes a drama - conflict, characters' response - is big part of it. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Chucky said:

But acting frightened is just one of the basics. It seems everyone is jumping the gun because they like this actress, everyone seemed to be praising her before the film was released. Personally i was more impressed with the horror in Tom Hanks' face at the end of Captain Phillips than I was with the main actress in films like US or Hereditary.

 

You can say it's not true but it's just my opinion and I'm not seeing many oscar nominations for these movies so I'm clearly not alone here.

I can't think of many horror performances, especially not the kind that we're referring to, in which "being frightened" is the extent of the performance. In addition, 'Frightened' is a particularly misrepresented word that actually covers a number of different actual emotions. In Invisible Man, Moss covers a wide range of emotional notes - comfortably as much as the standard awards performance. 

 

One could easily dismiss performing Hamlet as "Acting confused", Juliet as "Acting in love", Stanley Kowalski as "Acting Angry" and Wally Loman as "Acting Tired" if one wanted to be glib and dismissive. To simplify Toni Collette's detailed and complex portrayal of trauma, mistrust, self-blame, delusion, seething resentment, desire for nuclear familyhood and, yes, abject terror in Heriditary - quite literally one of the best of the last decade in film - to "being frightened" is just as reductive.

 

Comedy and horror are hard. Really hard. And they get absolutely shafted by awards in favour of easier genres like, most notoriously, biopics. If you want the proof just look at how many bad performances from greats there are in horror and comedy movies compared to dramas. How many times has De Niro fallen flat on his face doing horror?.....multiple. Nicholson nailed The Shining but is pretty awful in Wolf. Helen Mirren is awful in Winchester while Ian McKellen struggles in The Keep. Donald Sutherland in Virus, Heath Ledger in The Order, Nicholas Cage in (choose any option here), Nicole Kidman in The Invasion, Di Caprio in The Beach (not full horror but aligned), Jim Carrey in the Number 23. You can churn out an equivalent list for comedy (especially DeNiro, who decidedly finds drama a heck of a lot easier than any genre work).

Edited by Ipickthiswhiterose
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I thought this film was really fantastic. I've seen some complaints about a few of the world elements but I'm not too bothered (I found it to be really well put together from a set-up/pay off and character arc standpoint). It was just so well directed and Whannell knew how to really rack the tension up and make you feel uneasy at all times. There was also real restraint in what to show/what not to. Moss carries a lot of the film through her reactions and I think she really sells what her relationship with Adrian was without really seeing any of it, as well as the idea that someone is actively trying to destroy her life. There's also a really solid amount of longer takes during the more lively moments of the film which I thought was impressive how they pulled that off. 

Also loved the ending, found it very satisfying. 

Hope the film has some nice legs in the coming weeks. 

Edited by FilmFincher
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9 hours ago, Ipickthiswhiterose said:

 

Indeed.

 

Hoffman winning the Oscar for Rain Man rather than Cruise is a good example. Both roles were equally integral to that film's success, and indeed Cruise played the character that actually changed over the course of the movie, but the less subtle "character" role won out. 

 

Or even go with the two actors who were favoured that year....Hoffman and Hackman....imo, Hackman gave the best performance of the year with his interpretation of Special Agent Anderson in Mississippi Burning.  But the over the top role is the won that won.

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On ‎3‎/‎2‎/‎2020 at 10:17 AM, lorddemaxus said:

You probably need a look in the mirror before you say Elisabeth Moss looks ugly (she isn't really beautiful but she's definitely not ugly and probably better looking than you).

 

Also, the movie is sci-fi.

God, you are taking time to respond to an obvious Troll.... 

 

And a Sci Film can also be a horror film...."Alien" comes to mind. In fact, Sci Fi and Horror is a pretty common blend.

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