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@Numerator Pictures @cayommagazine

 

Tonight.

 

After the Oscar ceremony.

 

Prepare For Trouble....

 

AND MAKE IT DOUBLE!

 

#MeetTheOrangeOutrageCast

 

 

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@CookiePictures

 

Many congrats to New Journey Pictures for that amazing #Yang reveal. Truly a highlight of the night.

 

Oh, we got an announcement after the ceremony, but don't worry about that.

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Michelle Haywood sincerely apologizes for the mishap that had occurred in airing restricted content at the Academy Awards of the upcoming film The Epsilon Syndicate: Art of the Dream. The intended footage was a song from The Gardens Above, but an executive at Hourglass Pictures (who had since been severely reprimanded) had switched the footage at the last minute in a last ditch effort to gain publicity in the face of the jaw dropping Yang announcement. Either way, she takes responsibility for the mishap and has agreed to singlehandedly pay off the fees. "I'm incredibly mortified and ashamed of this oversight, and I do not mean that in any way against the team behind AotD. This was an unprofessional error that we truly apologize for," She issued in an emergency statement.

 

The film will still be released in February Y7.

 

Edited by Spaghetti
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 Image result for aisling franciosi" Image result for 1906 novel"  Image result for jack reynor"

 

Aisling Franciosi (The Nightingale, The Fall) and Jack Reynor (Midsommar, Sing Street) have been cast as the two leads of Brad Bird's 1906, playing an idealistic muckraker who works as a music critic and and a policeman who begins to question the law and authority of the city.

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Coming Y7

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10
Spoiler

"Help me remember... how long's it been?"

 

A dark fog creeps over Edwardian era London. A lone man, dressed in worn clothing, crosses the Westminster Bridge in the dead of night, lighting a smoke.

 

"Since I left the Yard? Five years?"

 

"Five years, yes... Lots have changed since you were gone."

 

The man stops at the tail end of the bridge, turning back to see if he's being followed. Something appears through the fog, forming into a sinister figure heading straight towards him before we cut to black.

 

"England's got a new monarch."

 

The funeral march of Queen Victoria plays out in an overcast setting, intercut with the coronation of Edward VII.

 

"All of Europe's on the move."

 

Quick shots of cities all across Europe show nationalist sentiment on the rise. An arms race escalates between countries, with shots of battleships being built and weapons being manufactured and distributed.

 

"And at home? We have a problem."

 

Cut back to the man on the bridge. He drops his cigarette and makes a run for it, making sharp turn after sharp turn across empty city streets. He soon thinks he's escaped his pursuer, but the fog encapsulates him, and he's soon surrounded by dozens of shadowy figures like the one he encountered on the bridge.

 

We cut to black as the man's scream is heard and the bells of the Big Ben rings. We fade to Scotland Yard Captain Anderson Boulford (Jared Harris), sunken into a chair in his office, appearing anxious while he talks to a figure just off camera.

 

BOULFORD: And I need you to come back.

???: Why me?

BOULFORD: You're the only one I trust, Barnes.

 

Reverse shot reveals detective Simon Barnes (Tom Hardy) standing by the doorway, arms crossed.

 

Bell rings.

 

A second montage shows Simon beginning a new investigation by himself, interspersed with exposition from Boulford.

 

"The runts of London are vanishing from the streets."

 

Bell rings.

 

Simon traverses an underground hallway, finding him surrounded by poverty-stricken citizens, many of the ethnic variety. He comes across a flowerbed dedicated to numerous people who seem to have disappeared, including children, with their families begging him to find out what happened to them.

 

"The poor... the beggars... the insane..."

 

Bell rings.

 

Inside a dimly lit mental asylum, Simon is suddenly assaulted by a man screaming off the top of his lungs. He fights him off, tossing him against the stone walls and knocking him out.

 

"All gone... and I have no clue why."

 

Bell rings.

 

Numerous cells inside the asylum are empty, even if clothes belonging to the inmates are still present, indicating they weren't moved or released. Simon takes notes.

 

Bell rings.

 

Cut back to Simon talking to Boulford. Simon looks at Boulford with suspicion.

 

SIMON: You make it sound like you don't know, but you think your men do.

 

Boulford leans forward, gesturing Simon to come closer.

 

BOULFORD: I'm afraid we'll be acting alone on this one, Barnes.

 

A look of determination builds on Simon's face.

 

SIMON: ...When do I start?

 

Bells rings.

 

We cut to black. A pair of symbols appear on screen, creaking and cracking until they form a pair of roman numerals, both above and below the film's title.

 

II

For Whom the Bell Tolls

II

 

Simon is running through the streets, taking cover in an alleyway. He cocks his pistol and readies to press onward, but he's started by a pair of gloves grabbing his shoulder from behind. He aims his gun, but it's revealed to be his wife, Ana (Oona Chaplin).

 

ANA: Woah, woah! Easy! It's me!

 

SIMON: ...Ana?! Fock's sake, what're 'ye doing here?!

 

ANA: 'Ye're fighting a battle you can't win alone...

 

Ana lifts her dress, revealing a pistol of her own strapped to her leg.

 

ANA: ...And I'm done staying at home.

 

Simon looks surprised and a bit baffled at first, but he shrugs and accepts his wife's help. Ana smiles.

 

 

Detective Simon Barnes returns

 

Holiday Y7

 

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@CookiePictures

 

Also coming Y7. How 'bout that?

 

Spoiler
 
 
 
 

A subway train zooms past. It’s a busy day at the stop, with crowds squeezing their way into each carriage. Some travelers don’t make their train because the cars are shock full, and naturally stressed commuters push and shove their way through similar-minded folk.

 

In between all of this we gradually uncover a peculiar sight: a woman in her 20s (Julia Garner), sporting a dark green jacket, striped shirt, black pants and fancy leather boots — only she herself is completely invisible, appearing as a stack of clothes acting on their own like a ghost.

 

The woman gets pushed around a lot. The passerby don’t even acknowledge she’s there most of the time, as if an invisible person is a common occurrence. She trips, spilling the contents of her purse, much of it being paperwork, all over the station floor.

 

No one seems to notice her or care, except for one man. Our focus shifts and reveals another invisible individual (Jonathan Groff), sporting a scarf, gloves and goggles along with his jacket covering a suit and tie beneath. He’s nose deep in a book — so we assume, unable to see his eyes — but his attention is soon drawn to the invisible woman scrambling for her papers.

 

The woman is knocked over a running passerby, and her purse slides to the edge of the platform, and we hear the sound of a subway car speeding towards the station. The woman panics, frantically rushing to grab her purse before it falls onto the track.

 

She catches it — she herself almost falls onto the track, but something grabs her from behind just in time! It’s the invisible man, clutching her arm and pulling her to safety. ”Careful!” he shouts, his words almost drowned out by the incoming train. 

 

The two invisibles lock eyes with one another, if you could call it that.

 

The man then bails, squeezing his way through a crowd of visibles cramming themselves onto a subway carriage. The woman remains standing on the train platform, watching the train leave with the man on board. The man tries to calm himself, a task not made easy as a visible middle-aged man forces his way onto his seat, pushing him to the floor.

 

 

(0:00 - 0:40, instrumental)

 

Cookie Pictures

 

"I met a girl at the station today. She looked just like me."

 

We see the invisible man working at an office. His co-workers seem to act like he isn't there, chatting and interacting with one another, one tossing a rubber ball which bounces off the invisible man's head with no one but him reacting.

 

"I don't think I could ever gather the courage to talk to her, though."

 

We see the man trying to enter a grocery store, humorously bumping his head against the automatic doors as they don't acknowledge he's there.

 

Cut to the man leaving the carriage back at the same station. By pure chance, he bumps into the same invisible woman again, spilling the contents of her purse once more. They profusely apologize to one another before their gaze meet a second time, realizing who each other is.

 

MAN: ...How long have you stood here?

WOMAN: I got off my train like two minutes ago, how long have you stood here?!

 

We see the two interacting in a city square outside the station, both climbing on top of a statue where they can overlook their surroundings without anyone caring they're there.

 

WOMAN: What's your name?

MAN: You won't remember it.

WOMAN: ...Could I make up a name for you, then?

MAN: ...I guess?

 

The woman thinks of a name.

 

WOMAN: I like your scarf. Could I call you Scarf?

SCARF: Sure. What's your name?

WOMAN: Boots.

 

Scarf looks at Boots and her, well, boots, holding his fingers over his goggles to imitate a raised eyebrow.

 

BOOTS: (chuckles) Let's just say I'm an enigma. Like you!

 

Boots leaps off the statue and starts running, encouraging Scarf to pursue her.

 

(3:26-)

 

SCARF

/

BOOTS

 

Scarf and Boots sit together on a park bench, struggling to think of ideas on what to do.

 

BOOTS: Have you ever tried pranking a person?

SCARF: ...No?

BOOTS: Would they even notice? Or care?

SCARF: I'd think if you pulled their pants down they'd notice eventually.

BOOTS: ...I wanna try it.

SCARF: Uuuh, wait—

 

Boots gets up, rushes towards a visible talking on the phone in attempt to pull a prank on him, only to, for reasons unexplained, be spotted by the visible's growling rottweiler. Scarf runs up behind Boots.

 

SCARF: (whispers) I think we should back off... slowly...

BOOTS: Yeah, good idea...

 

Both invisibles pull their arms up, slowly backing away as the rottweiler barks. The visible dismissively turns around and shushes his dog.

 

From John Carney, the director of 'Once'

 

Scarf and Boots enter Scarf's apartment together. Boots runs all over the place, ransacking every shelf and leaping over the couch in search for stuff. She then appears with a guitar in hand.

 

BOOTS: You know how to play a guitar?!

SCARF: I... uh... I do know, yeah...

BOOTS: Have you played for anyone before?

SCARF: Only my mum... and that was years ago...

BOOTS: And your mom thought you sucked?

SCARF: ...

BOOTS: (chuckles) It was a joke, lighten up!

 

Boots hands the guitar over to Scarf, and she gets seated, waiting patiently.

 

BOOTS: Come on... play a tune for me.

 

Scarf freezes in place.

 

Christmas Y7

 

More details coming Christmas Day

 

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After the resounding success of Academy Award Best Animated Feature winner Gateways, Endless Animation is ramping up production for one of its upcoming features; Seaside. 

 

Xavier B. Irving, was always a fan of musicals, and wanted to develop a great musical for Endless Animation, and pitched an idea based on his Caribbean and African culture with help from Kemp Powers (Pixar’s upcoming feature Soul) for Seaside.

 

Seaside will be the first entirely traditional animated film from Endless Animation as well as having a watercolor/paintery like style, as well as being the first animated film with a predominantly African-American cast and crew.

 

Kemp Powers will direct the film as he and Joe Robert Cole (Black Panther, Static Shock) will write the film as Ava DuVernay (Selma, A Wrinkle In Time) will produce. 

 

Inspired by classical musicals, Black Panther and Moana, Seaside takes place in a far away islands of Novos, a Carribean inspired island, that is home to the most majestic mythical creatures, and thriving with magic, thanks to devine god-like being, the Phoenix. However, for a thrilling life, 14 year old Princess Zora (Shahidi Wright Joseph) wants something more simple in life and pursue her passion in music while her sister Princess Note (Yara Shahidi) is excited to become queen, hellbent on upholding tradition. However, when Anasai (Jamie Foxx), the evil trickster spider god has been released, it is up to the sisters to work together, alongside the spirit of their ancestor (Craig Robinson) before he can unleash a plan to control and reawaken the Phoenix.

 

The cast includes:

Shahidi Wright Joseph as Zora 

Yara Shahidi as Note

Jamie Foxx as Anasai

Craig Robinson

Audra MacDonald 

Common

J. B. Smoove

Meagan Good

Cuba Gooding Jr.

and

Raven Symone

 

 

Seaside tentatively aims for a Holiday Y8 release date

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7 minutes ago, cookie said:

@CookiePictures

 

Also coming Y7. How 'bout that?

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

cannot wait to read this!

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10 minutes ago, cookie said:

@CookiePictures

 

Also coming Y7. How 'bout that?

 

  Hide contents
 
 
 
 

A subway train zooms past. It’s a busy day at the stop, with crowds squeezing their way into each carriage. Some travelers don’t make their train because the cars are shock full, and naturally stressed commuters push and shove their way through similar-minded folk.

 

In between all of this we gradually uncover a peculiar sight: a woman in her 20s (Julia Garner), sporting a dark green jacket, striped shirt, black pants and fancy leather boots — only she herself is completely invisible, appearing as a stack of clothes acting on their own like a ghost.

 

The woman gets pushed around a lot. The passerby don’t even acknowledge she’s there most of the time, as if an invisible person is a common occurrence. She trips, spilling the contents of her purse, much of it being paperwork, all over the station floor.

 

No one seems to notice her or care, except for one man. Our focus shifts and reveals another invisible individual (Jonathan Groff), sporting a scarf, gloves and goggles along with his jacket covering a suit and tie beneath. He’s nose deep in a book — so we assume, unable to see his eyes — but his attention is soon drawn to the invisible woman scrambling for her papers.

 

The woman is knocked over a running passerby, and her purse slides to the edge of the platform, and we hear the sound of a subway car speeding towards the station. The woman panics, frantically rushing to grab her purse before it falls onto the track.

 

She catches it — she herself almost falls onto the track, but something grabs her from behind just in time! It’s the invisible man, clutching her arm and pulling her to safety. ”Careful!” he shouts, his words almost drowned out by the incoming train. 

 

The two invisibles lock eyes with one another, if you could call it that.

 

The man then bails, squeezing his way through a crowd of visibles cramming themselves onto a subway carriage. The woman remains standing on the train platform, watching the train leave with the man on board. The man tries to calm himself, a task not made easy as a visible middle-aged man forces his way onto his seat, pushing him to the floor.

 

 

(0:00 - 0:40, instrumental)

 

Cookie Pictures

 

"I met a girl at the station today. She looked just like me."

 

We see the invisible man working at an office. His co-workers seem to act like he isn't there, chatting and interacting with one another, one tossing a rubber ball which bounces off the invisible man's head with no one but him reacting.

 

"I don't think I could ever gather the courage to talk to her, though."

 

We see the man trying to enter a grocery store, humorously bumping his head against the automatic doors as they don't acknowledge he's there.

 

Cut to the man leaving the carriage back at the same station. By pure chance, he bumps into the same invisible woman again, spilling the contents of her purse once more. They profusely apologize to one another before their gaze meet a second time, realizing who each other is.

 

MAN: ...How long have you stood here?

WOMAN: I got off my train like two minutes ago, how long have you stood here?!

 

We see the two interacting in a city square outside the station, both climbing on top of a statue where they can overlook their surroundings without anyone caring they're there.

 

WOMAN: What's your name?

MAN: You won't remember it.

WOMAN: ...Could I make up a name for you, then?

MAN: ...I guess?

 

The woman thinks of a name.

 

WOMAN: I like your scarf. Could I call you Scarf?

SCARF: Sure. What's your name?

WOMAN: Boots.

 

Scarf looks at Boots and her, well, boots, holding his fingers over his goggles to imitate a raised eyebrow.

 

BOOTS: (chuckles) Let's just say I'm an enigma. Like you!

 

Boots leaps off the statue and starts running, encouraging Scarf to pursue her.

 

(3:26-)

 

SCARF

/

BOOTS

 

Scarf and Boots sit together on a park bench, struggling to think of ideas on what to do.

 

BOOTS: Have you ever tried pranking a person?

SCARF: ...No?

BOOTS: Would they even notice? Or care?

SCARF: I'd think if you pulled their pants down they'd notice eventually.

BOOTS: ...I wanna try it.

SCARF: Uuuh, wait—

 

Boots gets up, rushes towards a visible talking on the phone in attempt to pull a prank on him, only to, for reasons unexplained, be spotted by the visible's growling rottweiler. Scarf runs up behind Boots.

 

SCARF: (whispers) I think we should back off... slowly...

BOOTS: Yeah, good idea...

 

Both invisibles pull their arms up, slowly backing away as the rottweiler barks. The visible dismissively turns around and shushes his dog.

 

From John Carney, the director of 'Once'

 

Scarf and Boots enter Scarf's apartment together. Boots runs all over the place, ransacking every shelf and leaping over the couch in search for stuff. She then appears with a guitar in hand.

 

BOOTS: You know how to play a guitar?!

SCARF: I... uh... I do know, yeah...

BOOTS: Have you played for anyone before?

SCARF: Only my mum... and that was years ago...

BOOTS: And your mom thought you sucked?

SCARF: ...

BOOTS: (chuckles) It was a joke, lighten up!

 

Boots hands the guitar over to Scarf, and she gets seated, waiting patiently.

 

BOOTS: Come on... play a tune for me.

 

Scarf freezes in place.

 

Christmas Y7

 

More details coming Christmas Day

 

This looks pretty great. Excited to see you branch out to smaller scale films.

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Academy Award Winner

ADAM DRIVER

 

Academy Award Winner

TESSA THOMPSON

+

Golden Globe Nominee

ROMAN GRIFFIN DAVIS

 

Golden Globe Nominee

PAM GRIER

 

December Y8

Edited by Blankments
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POKEMON: THE CASE OF THE ORANGE OUTRAGE

 

STARRING

 

RYAN POTTER as Ash Ketchum -- SOPHIE TURNER as Misty -- JOHN BOYEGA as Brock

 

 

CO-STARRING

 

Sonoya Mizuno as Professor Ivy - Midori Francis as Jessie - Ben Schnetzer as James

 

Skyler Gisondo as Tracey - Hamish Linklater as Drake - John Magaro as Gideon - William Jackson Harper as Celio 

 

with Alessandro Nivola as Archer

 

and Bill Nighy as Professor Oak

 

 

 

Catching a Theater Near You February Year 8

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@CayomMagazine

 

More information on Yang can be found in the drop-box.

 

Spoiler

Yang walks the fine line between 'sequel' and 'spiritual successor.' Its counter-part, Yin, was written and released before the idea of Yang was conceived; we see that Yin is a film that stresses the importance of order. But for Yang, the importance of chaos will be stressed. Specifically, the 'chaos' of nature and wildlife. Also, while Yin was about a father-daughter bond, Yang will be about a brother-sister bond.

 

Our filmmakers intend to go "all-in" on the concept of Yang as a 'weird,' 'trippy,' and/or 'confusing' film. The film will acknowledge the series' undercurrent of strange mental happenstances, but strives to maintain a certain amount of unanswered questions, so as not to influece the imagination of the viewers. Nevertheless, Yang will contain story elements that portray deeply human struggles. The film will also provide commentary on one or two important themes/subjects.

 

In Yang, a young woman named Miriam (Naomi Scott) receives the opportunity of a lifetime when she is offered a job as the Still Photographer for a television show by Mackenzie Robinson (Gwendoline Christie)--a zoologist who is to peacocks what Jane Goodall was to chimpanzees. She leaves her brother (Viviek Kalra) behind in London to pursue her dream job in India; however, she and the other young and/or impressionable filming recruits will soon learn that something is amiss.

 

All of the characters in Yang, with the exception of one, are brand new characters created for the film.


"I am very excited to direct this project," says Duncan Jones, who previously directed great thrillers such as Moon and Source Code. "I certainly want to toy with this concept's blend of whimsicality, lucidity, and humanity."

 

Yang is slated to release in theaters on June 9th, Y7. It will screen in IMAX theaters from the 9th to the 15th.

 

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14 minutes ago, 4815162342 said:

POKEMON: THE CASE OF THE ORANGE OUTRAGE

 

STARRING

 

RYAN POTTER as Ash Ketchum -- SOPHIE TURNER as Misty -- JOHN BOYEGA as Brock

 

 

CO-STARRING

 

Sonoya Mizuno as Professor Ivy - Midori Francis as Jessie - Ben Schnetzer as James

 

Skyler Gisondo as Tracey - Hamish Linklater as Drake - John Magaro as Gideon - William Jackson Harper as Celio 

 

with Alessandro Nivola as Archer

 

and Bill Nighy as Professor Oak

 

 

 

Catching a Theater Near You February Year 8

Horny Brock. We need horny Brock.

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1 minute ago, YourMother the Edgelord said:

Horny Brock. We need horny Brock.

And jelly donuts and the drying pan

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3 minutes ago, Reddroast said:

And jelly donuts and the drying pan

 

There is definitely not going to be a drying pan reference

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Hey, everyone.

 

So, if the over-the-top Oscar post didn't make it clear, I've decided that I will be cancelling both Part I and Part II of Star Fox, and I will be selling off the rights to the franchise for anyone who wants it. I imagine this is disappointing to some, but I can tell you this was absolutely not an easy decision to make. It's even one that I might regret sometime in the near future. But there are a lot of factors in why I decided to shelve this project.

 

First off, the film just kept growing bigger and bigger and bigger to the point that wasn't a CAYOM film anymore -- it was like full-blown miniseries, just this monstrous behemoth with too many characters, too many story threads and too many lofty ambitions. Never mind the fact that I had been working on this film for about two-and-a-half IRL years, dedicating basically all of my CAYOM time trying to get it right. Delaying it to Year 6 at first wasn't a huge problem. I felt like there were just a few storytelling bugs that needed fixing, and in that time I was making real progress on the film to the point where it felt like getting it done was going to be a real piece of cake. But delaying it to Year 7 really messed with my self-esteem. At that point I felt like I was getting nowhere with this thing at all, and I was investing too much time in Star Fox when I could've been focusing on stuff elsewhere. Star Fox just felt fated to be in development hell forever. The awards ceremony today was the straw that broke the camel's back, when I was trying to write a trailer. I am sick and tired of playing the hype game for this film, trying to get everybody really excited for something that I didn't know I was ever going to complete. I said back in Year 5 that if I had to delay Star Fox again I would can it then, but I decided not to make that decision then because I felt like there was room for potential. I've reached the point where there is no room for potential. Because I wasn't getting anything out of it, I decided I was done with Star Fox.

 

Another important reason was that I felt completely constrained by the source material. I've been wanting for so many years to break off from doing adapted stuff and finally start moving into writing original films. I feel like the game has completely changed for the better since 2.0. The people who write for CAYOM are using this opportunity to explore unique original concepts, like the Spark movies, The Scavenger Wars, By the Balls, etc. Paradise Island, which just won the Oscar for Best Picture, is an example of one of those great original films. I'm surrounded by people who are in complete control of their craft. Meanwhile, writing for an existing franchise property like Star Fox and turning it into its own thing, but at the end of the day it was never going to as creatively fulfilling. I want to create my own characters and my own worlds, instead of working within someone else's framework. There were so many parts of my Star Fox film that seemed so fun and vibrant that no one would recognize as Star Fox, and would absolutely never would make it past a board meeting at Nintendo.

 

I was afraid my Star Fox films were gonna be judged on how much they deviated from the source material, how bonkers they were, and how much it captured the style of a filmmaker that after rewatching OUATIH, I don't feel as enthusiastic about anymore. I'm a Jackie Brown person. But Star Fox is not Jackie Brown. I want to have my own style, not mimic someone else's.

 

Does this mean I'll lose a ton of my work? Yes. Does this mean I'll have to go back to the drawing board in some places? Yes. But I can't wait for the adventure ahead that comes with creating something new. I feel like creating something original helps keep people's expectations open. So, tomorrow evening, I'll release the trailer for my new original science-fiction animated epic, with the working title Wanderer, and I'll release an informational post about the film over the weekend. It's an idea that goes all the way back to 2.0, and one that's been gestating in my head for several years now. I'm excited to write it, along with all of the other new projects I'm pursuing for Y7 and beyond.

 

So, once again, I'm sorry if this announcement comes as a bit of a disappointment for some. If anyone wants, I'm willing to share the plethora of concepts I developed for my Star Fox film, and if anyone else wants to tackle the source material, the rights are yours.

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5 minutes ago, 4815162342 said:

 

There is definitely not going to be a drying pan reference

So a yes for the jelly donuts

3 minutes ago, Alpha said:

Hey, everyone.

 

So, if the over-the-top Oscar post didn't make it clear, I've decided that I will be cancelling both Part I and Part II of Star Fox, and I will be selling off the rights to the franchise for anyone who wants it. I imagine this is disappointing to some, but I can tell you this was absolutely not an easy decision to make. It's even one that I might regret sometime in the near future. But there are a lot of factors in why I decided to shelve this project.

 

First off, the film just kept growing bigger and bigger and bigger to the point that wasn't a CAYOM film anymore -- it was like full-blown miniseries, just this monstrous behemoth with too many characters, too many story threads and too many lofty ambitions. Never mind the fact that I had been working on this film for about two-and-a-half IRL years, dedicating basically all of my CAYOM time trying to get it right. Delaying it to Year 6 at first wasn't a huge problem. I felt like there were just a few storytelling bugs that needed fixing, and in that time I was making real progress on the film to the point where it felt like getting it done was going to be a real piece of cake. But delaying it to Year 7 really messed with my self-esteem. At that point I felt like I was getting nowhere with this thing at all, and I was investing too much time in Star Fox when I could've been focusing on stuff elsewhere. Star Fox just felt fated to be in development hell forever. The awards ceremony today was the straw that broke the camel's back, when I was trying to write a trailer. I am sick and tired of playing the hype game for this film, trying to get everybody really excited for something that I didn't know I was ever going to complete. I said back in Year 5 that if I had to delay Star Fox again I would can it then, but I decided not to make that decision then because I felt like there was room for potential. I've reached the point where there is no room for potential. Because I wasn't getting anything out of it, I decided I was done with Star Fox.

 

Another important reason was that I felt completely constrained by the source material. I've been wanting for so many years to break off from doing adapted stuff and finally start moving into writing original films. I feel like the game has completely changed for the better since 2.0. The people who write for CAYOM are using this opportunity to explore unique original concepts, like the Spark movies, The Scavenger Wars, By the Balls, etc. Paradise Island, which just won the Oscar for Best Picture, is an example of one of those great original films. I'm surrounded by people who are in complete control of their craft. Meanwhile, writing for an existing franchise property like Star Fox and turning it into its own thing, but at the end of the day it was never going to as creatively fulfilling. I want to create my own characters and my own worlds, instead of working within someone else's framework. There were so many parts of my Star Fox film that seemed so fun and vibrant that no one would recognize as Star Fox, and would absolutely never would make it past a board meeting at Nintendo.

 

I was afraid my Star Fox films were gonna be judged on how much they deviated from the source material, how bonkers they were, and how much it captured the style of a filmmaker that after rewatching OUATIH, I don't feel as enthusiastic about anymore. I'm a Jackie Brown person. But Star Fox is not Jackie Brown. I want to have my own style, not mimic someone else's.

 

Does this mean I'll lose a ton of my work? Yes. Does this mean I'll have to go back to the drawing board in some places? Yes. But I can't wait for the adventure ahead that comes with creating something new. I feel like creating something original helps keep people's expectations open. So, tomorrow evening, I'll release the trailer for my new original science-fiction animated epic, with the working title Wanderer, and I'll release an informational post about the film over the weekend. It's an idea that goes all the way back to 2.0, and one that's been gestating in my head for several years now. I'm excited to write it, along with all of the other new projects I'm pursuing for Y7 and beyond.

 

So, once again, I'm sorry if this announcement comes as a bit of a disappointment for some. If anyone wants, I'm willing to share the plethora of concepts I developed for my Star Fox film, and if anyone else wants to tackle the source material, the rights are yours.

I'm willing to take up the rights

Edited by Reddroast

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6 minutes ago, Alpha said:

Hey, everyone.

 

So, if the over-the-top Oscar post didn't make it clear, I've decided that I will be cancelling both Part I and Part II of Star Fox, and I will be selling off the rights to the franchise for anyone who wants it. I imagine this is disappointing to some, but I can tell you this was absolutely not an easy decision to make. It's even one that I might regret sometime in the near future. But there are a lot of factors in why I decided to shelve this project.

 

First off, the film just kept growing bigger and bigger and bigger to the point that wasn't a CAYOM film anymore -- it was like full-blown miniseries, just this monstrous behemoth with too many characters, too many story threads and too many lofty ambitions. Never mind the fact that I had been working on this film for about two-and-a-half IRL years, dedicating basically all of my CAYOM time trying to get it right. Delaying it to Year 6 at first wasn't a huge problem. I felt like there were just a few storytelling bugs that needed fixing, and in that time I was making real progress on the film to the point where it felt like getting it done was going to be a real piece of cake. But delaying it to Year 7 really messed with my self-esteem. At that point I felt like I was getting nowhere with this thing at all, and I was investing too much time in Star Fox when I could've been focusing on stuff elsewhere. Star Fox just felt fated to be in development hell forever. The awards ceremony today was the straw that broke the camel's back, when I was trying to write a trailer. I am sick and tired of playing the hype game for this film, trying to get everybody really excited for something that I didn't know I was ever going to complete. I said back in Year 5 that if I had to delay Star Fox again I would can it then, but I decided not to make that decision then because I felt like there was room for potential. I've reached the point where there is no room for potential. Because I wasn't getting anything out of it, I decided I was done with Star Fox.

 

Another important reason was that I felt completely constrained by the source material. I've been wanting for so many years to break off from doing adapted stuff and finally start moving into writing original films. I feel like the game has completely changed for the better since 2.0. The people who write for CAYOM are using this opportunity to explore unique original concepts, like the Spark movies, The Scavenger Wars, By the Balls, etc. Paradise Island, which just won the Oscar for Best Picture, is an example of one of those great original films. I'm surrounded by people who are in complete control of their craft. Meanwhile, writing for an existing franchise property like Star Fox and turning it into its own thing, but at the end of the day it was never going to as creatively fulfilling. I want to create my own characters and my own worlds, instead of working within someone else's framework. There were so many parts of my Star Fox film that seemed so fun and vibrant that no one would recognize as Star Fox, and would absolutely never would make it past a board meeting at Nintendo.

 

I was afraid my Star Fox films were gonna be judged on how much they deviated from the source material, how bonkers they were, and how much it captured the style of a filmmaker that after rewatching OUATIH, I don't feel as enthusiastic about anymore. I'm a Jackie Brown person. But Star Fox is not Jackie Brown. I want to have my own style, not mimic someone else's.

 

Does this mean I'll lose a ton of my work? Yes. Does this mean I'll have to go back to the drawing board in some places? Yes. But I can't wait for the adventure ahead that comes with creating something new. I feel like creating something original helps keep people's expectations open. So, tomorrow evening, I'll release the trailer for my new original science-fiction animated epic, with the working title Wanderer, and I'll release an informational post about the film over the weekend. It's an idea that goes all the way back to 2.0, and one that's been gestating in my head for several years now. I'm excited to write it, along with all of the other new projects I'm pursuing for Y7 and beyond.

 

So, once again, I'm sorry if this announcement comes as a bit of a disappointment for some. If anyone wants, I'm willing to share the plethora of concepts I developed for my Star Fox film, and if anyone else wants to tackle the source material, the rights are yours.

 

I'm really happy for you Alpha! I can't wait to read your original films!

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@Alpha I know that this was not an easy decision to make, but sometimes it can be a hugely liberating burden off your back. I respect anything that will allow you to move forward more confidence and happiness in both your work and your own personal life.

 

Sending LOTS of love and good vibes.

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Luke Evans and Miley Cyrus round out the cast of Marielle Heller and Tarell Alvin McCraney’s Ms. Blakk for President. They join Titus Burgess and William Jackson Harper in the political dramedy.

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