Jump to content
Water Bottle

Classic Conversation Thread | Vote for Joe Biden November 3

Recommended Posts

TIFF 2019: FULL LINEUP REVEALED!

 

https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/article/tiff-2019-lineup-revealed/

 

Quote

Gala

  • Opening night: Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band, directed by Daniel Roher
  • Closing night: Radioactive, directed by Marjane Satrapi
  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, directed by Marielle Heller
  • Abominable, directed by Jill Culton
  • American Woman, directed by Semi Chellas
  • Blackbird, directed by  Roger Michell
  • Clemency, directed by Chinonye Chukwu
  • Ford v Ferrari, directed by James Mangold
  • Harriet, directed by Kasi Lemmons
  • Hustlers, directed by Lorene Scafaria
  • Joker, directed by Todd Phillips
  • Just Mercy, directed by Destin Daniel Cretton
  • Ordinary Love, directed by Lisa Barros D’Sa, Glenn Leyburn
  • The Goldfinch, directed by John Crowley
  • The Sky Is Pink, directed by Shonali Bose
  • The Song of Names, directed by François Girard
  • True History of the Kelly Gang, directed by Justin Kurzel
  • Western Stars, directed by Thom Zimny, Bruce Springsteen

Special presentations

  • A Herdade, directed by Tiago Guedes
  • Bad Education, directed by Cory Finley
  • Coming Home Again, directed by Wayne Wang
  • Dolemite is My Name, directed by Craig Brewer
  • Ema, directed by Pablo Larraín
  • Endings, Beginnings, directed by Drake Doremus
  • Frankie, directed by Ira Sachs
  • Greed, directed by Michael Winterbottom
  • Guest of Honour, directed by Atom Egoyan
  • Heroic Losers, directed by Sebastian Borensztein
  • Honey Boy, directed by Alma Har’el
  • Hope Gap, directed by William Nicholson
  • How to Build a Girl, directed by Coky Giedroyc
  • I Am Woman, directed by Unjoo Moon
  • Jojo Rabbit, directed by Taika Waititi
  • Judy, directed by Rupert Goold
  • Knives Out, directed by Rian Johnson
  • La Belle Époque, directed by Nicolas Bedos
  • Marriage Story, directed by Noah Baumbach
  • Military Wives, directed by Peter Cattaneo
  • Motherless Brooklyn, directed by Edward Norton
  • No. 7 Cherry Lane, directed by Yonfan
  • Pain and Glory, directed by Pedro Almodóvar
  • Parasite, directed by Bong Joon-ho
  • Pelican Blood, directed by Katrin Gebbe
  • Portrait of a Lady on Fire, directed by Céline Sciamma
  • Saturday Fiction, directed by Lou Ye
  • The Friend, directed by Gabriela Cowperthwaite
  • The Laundromat, directed by Steven Soderbergh
  • The Lighthouse, directed by Robert Eggers
  • The Other Lamb, directed by Malgorzata Szumowska
  • The Painted Bird, directed by Václav Marhoul
  • The Personal History of David Copperfield, directed by Armando Iannucci
  • The Report, directed by Scott Z Burns
  • The Two Popes, directed by Fernando Meirelles
  • Uncut Gems, directed by Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie
  • Weathering With You, directed by Makoto Shinkai
  • While at War, directed by Alejandro Amenábar

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cannastop said:

Support women.

 

Also for $5 too. Anyone here living close to a theater showing it that missed it the first time has no excuse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot there was another Ned Kelly movie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JB33 said:

@terrestrial Out of curiosity, what was the toughest part of teaching yourself English?

 

that is a loooong answer, hence why  I'll use spoiler tags

 

Spoiler

I think that is very different for everyone, depends a lot on someone personal strength and 'weaknesses for certain 'talents' = I can only tell my version.

 

I am good with math, physics, technology.... history (but not the dates - when something happened, but the cultural differences to us, lots of details out of their POV about what's proper and so on)

I am very bad with names - I guess that is based on my face-blindness - I never developed a 'brain' to save names, as I cannot remember them anyway.

I remember people stories, what details they told me are unique. Like I help sometimes in a store, a lot of people know I am face-blind as I tell that often (so no one feels affronted, if I do not recognize them). If I realize who someone is again, even if the person and me met not since 20years, but some things he / she says triggers the 'uniqueness-package' I saved from a conversation - then I can recall the complete package.

 

 

Self teaching was for me difficult as terms often have more than one meaning and in connection with this or that can change the meaning or only count for specific circumstances. And those different uses are not the same as the different uses we here in Germany have.

An example = Birne

Birne in German can mean pear or bulb in official German, but it also means brain/mind in the more salopp use of German. Like if someone is rather smart, he/she has something in his/her 'Birne' = based on the head has a roughly similar form to a pear.

= I have to remember the ~ patterns a term gets used for, as I am bad to only remember a one-to-one translation of a term, also to remember solo terms at all

 

 

The other big group is grammar.

I learned in the '70 the basics (45 minutes per week during school times = at max 40 times per year, probably 38 times per public holidays also), like past present future, and the continuous form (that we do not have), and the 'might' / ' will' differences, and such, but only the ~ surface.

The method was, the teacher wrote on a very huge multi-sectional blackboard, we had to copy all what was written there, she wrote rather fast, we had to hurry to catch up. Very seldom some spoken exchange, an opportunity to ask a question. The first year I didn't even understand 1/2 of what I was copying onto my exercise book. Without the school books I'd have been lost entirely.

What I perceived as also hindering: what we were trained to use as first sentences and later…. No one uses such kind of wording in real life. I man, yes, ‘How do you do?’…. can happen.

But not as the like 4th sentence if you met for the first time another person - at least in my experience. Also the simple grammar, it sounds to me today like a 3years old speaks.

= English has a rich grammar, but you can get through with a simple grammar.

All what I now use - after the simple / basic grammar - no one ever taught nor explained to me, the little things like 'look up for this or that accompanying term, or... to recognize ....' I only feel that, its not based on anything I learned in the past.

No one corrects.

And that leads to the next big problem,

1. if no one corrects, you get used to ‘the wrong’ and have to re-train, if you finally find out there is a mistake. To re-train is in my POV more difficult than to learn it from the beginning in the correct way

 

 

2. if no one corrects it happens you use a term for years in the wrong way. If people are used to your kind of level, sometimes they do not even guess you might mean the opposite.

3. Regional sayings, jokes,… fly over your head. That is also bcs not enough people even realize how different humor gets seen per surrounding, like even within the same country, what’s ok or funny in one region (like gets used also from prickly persons) might get seen as not funny at all by another regions person, even if vulgar or…

= the last 3 points are based on, no personal, spoken contact to a local / native speaking person, no possibility to observe and learn out of that, to hear per sound how something is even meant. And get an instant correction, if such a kind of person is willing to do so.

 

I learned the earlier mentioned ‘pattern’ how terms get used by reading tons of books, watching at first VHS in English with English subtitles (very difficult and expensive to get then) and later with discs and audiobooks to.

But as I read also old English written books I still get confused, have ‘patterns’ not secured as they still vary, especially if you read the likes of Alfred Tennyson, who even wrote in his time in a way older English style than his counterparts (I think the term is wrong, the other writers of his lifetime)

 

Last:

Why and when to begin to train yourself. If it’s starting in school or soon after, that I think would be helpful. I had some years of English-free times, till I needed for work technical English to understand = for an English written handbook of a specialized software (long before the first Windows).

As older you get and as longer you do not use even those small basics they taught then (nowadays English gets a lot more time), as more you ‘loose’ again.

I think as they do it now, to start way earlier then then (like in 2nd grade instead of 7th grade), to integrate local geography… is very positive. Also: in school they are always a little step ahead of a people, lots of people make the mistake if loaning / buying reading material to strengthen the taught details…. they choose too high levelled texts. To strengthen the learned, the material should be a half step simpler than the actual school material, so it’s not ‘torture’, help to gain confidence, lessens the ‘angst’ about a foreign language. I am running a school library - that detail has proven to be very important.

 

(Btw, my brother has a complete different experience, he speaks at least 5 foreign languages in a way locals think he is a local out from another city, mostly like in their capital, and English in perfect grammar, but with a horrible / very strong German accent, that actually hurts my ears. But he was never a fan of math…)

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, terrestrial said:

 

 

that is a loooong answer, hence why  I'll use spoiler tags

 

 

  Hide contents

I think that is very different for everyone, depends a lot on someone personal strength and 'weaknesses for certain 'talents' = I can only tell my version.

 

 

 

I am good with math, physics, technology.... history (but not the dates - when something happened, but the cultural differences to us, lots of details out of their POV about what's proper and so on)

 

 

I am very bad with names - I guess that is based on my face-blindness - I never developed a 'brain' to save names, as I cannot remember them anyway.

 

 

I remember people stories, what details they told me are unique. Like I help sometimes in a store, a lot of people know I am face-blind as I tell that often (so no one feels affronted, if I do not recognize them). If I realize who someone is again, even if the person and me met not since 20years, but some things he / she says triggers the 'uniqueness-package' I saved from a conversation - then I can recall the complete package.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Self teaching was for me difficult as terms often have more than one meaning and in connection with this or that can change the meaning or only count for specific circumstances. And those different uses are not the same as the different uses we here in Germany have.

An example = Birne

Birne in German can mean pear or bulb in official German, but it also means brain/mind in the more salopp use of German. Like if someone is rather smart, he/she has something in his/her 'Birne' = based on the head has a roughly similar form to a pear.

 

 

= I have to remember the ~ patterns a term gets used for, as I am bad to only remember a one-to-one translation of a term, also to remember solo terms at all

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other big group is grammar.

I learned in the '70 the basics (45 minutes per week during school times = at max 40 times per year, probably 38 times per public holidays also), like past present future, and the continuous form (that we do not have), and the 'might' / ' will' differences, and such, but only the ~ surface.

 

 

The method was, the teacher wrote on a very huge multi-sectional blackboard, we had to copy all what was written there, she wrote rather fast, we had to hurry to catch up. Very seldom some spoken exchange, an opportunity to ask a question. The first year I didn't even understand 1/2 of what I was copying onto my exercise book. Without the school books I'd have been lost entirely.

What I perceived as also hindering: what we were trained to use as first sentences and later…. No one uses such kind of wording in real life. I man, yes, ‘How do you do?’…. can happen.

But not as the like 4th sentence if you met for the first time another person - at least in my experience. Also the simple grammar, it sounds to me today like a 3years old speaks.

 

 

= English has a rich grammar, but you can get through with a simple grammar.

All what I now use - after the simple / basic grammar - no one ever taught nor explained to me, the little things like 'look up for this or that accompanying term, or... to recognize ....' I only feel that, its not based on anything I learned in the past.

 

 

No one corrects.

 

 

And that leads to the next big problem,

 

 

1. if no one corrects, you get used to ‘the wrong’ and have to re-train, if you finally find out there is a mistake. To re-train is in my POV more difficult than to learn it from the beginning in the correct way

 

 

 

 

2. if no one corrects it happens you use a term for years in the wrong way. If people are used to your kind of level, sometimes they do not even guess you might mean the opposite.

 

 

3. Regional sayings, jokes,… fly over your head. That is also bcs not enough people even realize how different humor gets seen per surrounding, like even within the same country, what’s ok or funny in one region (like gets used also from prickly persons) might get seen as not funny at all by another regions person, even if vulgar or…

 

 

= the last 3 points are based on, no personal, spoken contact to a local / native speaking person, no possibility to observe and learn out of that, to hear per sound how something is even meant. And get an instant correction, if such a kind of person is willing to do so.

 

 

 

 

 

I learned the earlier mentioned ‘pattern’ how terms get used by reading tons of books, watching at first VHS in English with English subtitles (very difficult and expensive to get then) and later with discs and audiobooks to.

 

 

But as I read also old English written books I still get confused, have ‘patterns’ not secured as they still vary, especially if you read the likes of Alfred Tennyson, who even wrote in his time in a way older English style than his counterparts (I think the term is wrong, the other writers of his lifetime)

 

 

 

 

 

Last:

 

 

Why and when to begin to train yourself. If it’s starting in school or soon after, that I think would be helpful. I had some years of English-free times, till I needed for work technical English to understand = for an English written handbook of a specialized software (long before the first Windows).

 

 

As older you get and as longer you do not use even those small basics they taught then (nowadays English gets a lot more time), as more you ‘loose’ again.

 

 

I think as they do it now, to start way earlier then then (like in 2nd grade instead of 7th grade), to integrate local geography… is very positive. Also: in school they are always a little step ahead of a people, lots of people make the mistake if loaning / buying reading material to strengthen the taught details…. they choose too high levelled texts. To strengthen the learned, the material should be a half step simpler than the actual school material, so it’s not ‘torture’, help to gain confidence, lessens the ‘angst’ about a foreign language. I am running a school library - that detail has proven to be very important.

 

 

 

 

 

(Btw, my brother has a complete different experience, he speaks at least 5 foreign languages in a way locals think he is a local out from another city, mostly like in their capital, and English in perfect grammar, but with a horrible / very strong German accent, that actually hurts my ears. But he was never a fan of math…)

 

 

 

Thank you for this response, @terrestrial. It's very intriguing reading about a non native English speaker's experience learning the language, especially when it's self taught.

 

I guess, being a native speaker, I'll never really understand how difficult it is to learn. I for one love the German language so I'd love to learn someday. I took French up to Grade 11 but stopped there. I was good at reading, writing and even speaking - but I struggled listening to someone else speaking it and understanding them and being able to reply instinctively. All these years later I've come to learn that a lot of that is because I'm very hard of hearing, not just with volume but with enunciation. I struggle enough understanding everyone in ENGLISH if they're not speaking very clearly, let alone trying to understand someone speaking a foreign language.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, JB33 said:

Thank you for this response, @terrestrial. It's very intriguing reading about a non native English speaker's experience learning the language, especially when it's self taught.

 

I guess, being a native speaker, I'll never really understand how difficult it is to learn. I for one love the German language so I'd love to learn someday. I took French up to Grade 11 but stopped there. I was good at reading, writing and even speaking - but I struggled listening to someone else speaking it and understanding them and being able to reply instinctively. All these years later I've come to learn that a lot of that is because I'm very hard of hearing, not just with volume but with enunciation. I struggle enough understanding everyone in ENGLISH if they're not speaking very clearly, let alone trying to understand someone speaking a foreign language.

Without the movie watching trick (tons of movies and TV-series) and later, as I understood more so the visual support was less important, audiobooks I'd not understand any native speaker with a slight accent. And even with audiobooks, I still look a bit for who spoke it, which other audiobooks did he/she..... it helped a lot

 

I did watch TV-series a lot as the lead actors stay the same and as such (with the help of the subtitles) I learned to get used to a certain speaking style, to understand more and more.

If you want to learn that way, see the The Wire TV series or the difference between the British and the American version of the Harry Potter audiobooks,, there are TV-series / movies / audiobooks... that get recorded with partially strong local accents, those might not be a good idea to pick early on. Or a mumbling actor....

In the case you do want to try out, let me know which genre you prefer, which kind of story, maybe I'll find something with a better suited pronunciation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, terrestrial said:

Without the movie watching trick (tons of movies and TV-series) and later, as I understood more so the visual support was less important, audiobooks I'd not understand any native speaker with a slight accent. And even with audiobooks, I still look a bit for who spoke it, which other audiobooks did he/she..... it helped a lot

 

I did watch TV-series a lot as the lead actors stay the same and as such (with the help of the subtitles) I learned to get used to a certain speaking style, to understand more and more.

If you want to learn that way, see the The Wire TV series or the difference between the British and the American version of the Harry Potter audiobooks,, there are TV-series / movies / audiobooks... that get recorded with partially strong local accents, those might not be a good idea to pick early on. Or a mumbling actor....

In the case you do want to try out, let me know which genre you prefer, which kind of story, maybe I'll find something with a better suited pronunciation

We might be misunderstanding each other. I'm a native English speaker

 

Unless you are referring to options to help with hearing enunciation properly. In that case, I mostly watch movies and TV with subtitles at home. In most other cases, I have to have my TV way too high up for my roommates. Subtitles have been a godsend for me. Before I did that I had been used to watching things and missing so much context and so many small but crucial details in the dialogue. Even now I'll put on movies I know very well, but with subtitles, and certain scenes take on a whole new meaning because I can read every word that's being said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JB33 said:

We might be misunderstanding each other. I'm a native English speaker

 

Unless you are referring to options to help with hearing enunciation properly. In that case, I mostly watch movies and TV with subtitles at home. In most other cases, I have to have my TV way too high up for my roommates. Subtitles have been a godsend for me. Before I did that I had been used to watching things and missing so much context and so many small but crucial details in the dialogue. Even now I'll put on movies I know very well, but with subtitles, and certain scenes take on a whole new meaning because I can read every word that's being said.

No,

I only gave the English titles as examples for how different the accents in a tv series, audiobook or.... can be to what someone might consider a somewhat neutral accent version.

We even have a word for 'accent free German' = Hochdeutsch = ~ HighGerman = that 'accent' meaning German spoken like written = up in the North of Germany based.

To train German, the material should be spoken in Hochdeutsch, not in e.g. Bavarian (like in my region) = most non Bavarians Germans wont really understand a stronger version of a Bavarian accent. Not even all Bavarians understand all of the many different Bavarian accents, beside all of them being German too (I speak about countryside) and all understanding Hochdeutsch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, TMP said:

Wow, it's the actor who gave the best male performance of 2017 and Timothée Chalamet? great cast.

Why out of competition tho?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, terrestrial said:

No,

I only gave the English titles as examples for how different the accents in a tv series, audiobook or.... can be to what someone might consider a somewhat neutral accent version.

We even have a word for 'accent free German' = Hochdeutsch = ~ HighGerman = that 'accent' meaning German spoken like written = up in the North of Germany based.

To train German, the material should be spoken in Hochdeutsch, not in e.g. Bavarian (like in my region) = most non Bavarians Germans wont really understand a stronger version of a Bavarian accent. Not even all Bavarians understand all of the many different Bavarian accents, beside all of them being German too (I speak about countryside) and all understanding Hochdeutsch.

Ahhh, I see. 

 

Thank you. I will definitely take you up on that soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, 2010s Painkiller Race said:

does Batman usually feel like shit because he is feigning for sugary soda? 

and he has to chug water to fight off dehydration before talking to people with that 'ughhh' feeling?

Some of these posts are pure gold!

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched The Spectacular Now and realised that Brie Larson and Kaitlyn Dever both played 18 year olds in that movie on the same year as Short Term 12 (where Brie Larson played a character who was probably 10 years older than Dever's character). Has this kind of thing ever happened before (I know that there are other times where something like this has happened but never seen it happen on the same year)?

Edited by lorddemaxus
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

interesting how Hardball (9/14/01) kept the release date when everything else moved, and it was on gun violence.

Hardball opened the weekend after The Musketeer, which was marketed like a 30M OW, or marketed to have the action look like a wire-fu Mummy Returns but with a Musketeer.  It only opened to 10.3 and finished at 27.1 with 7.5 overseas.  Hardball did 9.4/40.2.  What would they have opened like if they were released in 2000 instead of 2001?  Highlander: Endgame did terrible with 5.1 OW in 2000.  Hidalgo isn't The Musketeer when sword fighting movies were starved.  I'd think Hardball might have done a little more, but The Musketeer and all these pre-Transformers actions movies made crowd reports a hot thing for top 10 movie followers back then.  I think Hardball, and the hostile pressure people face in giant Urban cities should be saved if people keep registering for the internet and become screen addicts. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, 2010s Painkiller Race said:

do we think that all old people that grew up without the internet are bullies?

 

Well, there were bullies, and there were people like Martin Luther King Jr.. I think it's a mixed salad of good souls and sour souls in each of the ages.

Edited by SLAM!
  • Astonished 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Guidelines. Feel free to read our Privacy Policy as well.