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RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET | 328.2 M overseas ● 529.3 M worldwide

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Dom + OS-China + China according to Mojo

WIR1 189.4 + 281.8 + 0.0 = 471.2

WIR2 197.2 + 250.5 + 39.3 = 487

 

WIR2 will hit 200 Dom and maybe 275 OS-China. That will push the ww to 515. Good result but frankly underwhelming.

 

 

 

 

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On 2/9/2019 at 9:21 PM, Fullbuster said:

I won't hide it, I expected more than $500m WW for Ralph 2, they were on the right path with all the princesses in it but somehow they messed up when the movie released..even Disney is not immune to poor marketing.

The Disney princesses scene became viral for a time, but indeed it was a wasted opportunity as it was long forgotten when the movie was released. They didn’t manage to sustain the hype from that scene. A mess.

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Unless France performs beyond expectations, Hotel Transylvania 3 will end up beating Ralph 2 WW. Keep in mind Ralph 2's budget was $175 million (no idea why Disney/Pixar animated films are so expensive) versus $80 million for Hotel Transylvania 3. 

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2 hours ago, KP1025 said:

Unless France performs beyond expectations, Hotel Transylvania 3 will end up beating Ralph 2 WW. Keep in mind Ralph 2's budget was $175 million (no idea why Disney/Pixar animated films are so expensive) versus $80 million for Hotel Transylvania 3. 

 

That's an easy one: Disney/Pixar movies have a much better animation : more detailled. Other animated movies are more simplistic in their art style, there are less things happening on screen..etc..The gap is glaring, Disney is top-notch when it comes to that, the top dog...and it has a price.

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Added another $4 million since last week.

 

Quote

Total Lifetime Grosses

Domestic: $200,511,483   38.2%

+ Foreign: $324,105,299   61.8%

Worldwide: $524,616,782 

 

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16 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Sony $528.6 $167.5 31.7% $361.1 68.3%
17 Ralph Breaks the Internet BV $524.6 $200.5 38.2% $324.1 61.8%
18 Dr. Seuss' The Grinch (2018) Uni. $511.3 $270.6 52.9% $240.7 47.1%

 

 

With a $4m week it should pass HT3 in the next couple of weeks.  It'll be close though.

 

Edited by TalismanRing
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This has finally overtaken HT3 WW.

 

Quote

 

Ralph Breaks the Internet 

Total Lifetime Grosses

Domestic: $201,091,711   38.0%

+ Foreign: $327,640,144   62.0%

= Worldwide: $528,731,855 

 

Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation

Total Lifetime Grosses

Domestic: $167,510,016   31.7%

+ Foreign: $361,073,758   68.3%

= Worldwide: $528,583,774 

 

 

 

Edited by KP1025
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On 1/1/2019 at 7:04 AM, MrFanaticGuy34 said:

That and the fact that on OW in the US, it opened the exact same number as Moana & Big Hero 6, but with lesser DOM-legs. $56M OW to be exact.

 

Maybe it was probably undermarketed for it to have this standard opening for a Disney film. Hence why OS isn’t exploding Big Hero 6 or Zootopia-style either.

WDAS movies this millennium have typically been undersold, but on the average they have the strongest legs of any set of movies from any studio (including Pixar), so they typically make up for it.  The two Wreck-It Ralph movies just have relatively weak legs for WDAS movies.  And by the way, easily the weakest marketing (by Disney) I've seen was for Frozen, so it's really no excuse.

 

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When you know the fact that a Disney-sequel (never mind Pixar) opened with exactly $56M (same OW as Moana & Big Hero 6), being the third November-Disney film in a row....and with lesser opening & DOM-gross than Illumination’s The Grinch (which opened at $67M, still at nearly $266M DOM & $470M WW), then clearly something’s wrong with the marketing Disney animated movies. Can’t always rely  only on quality from previous Disney films without awareness.

Each WDAS movie has to generate its own WOM, and the majority of them of late have not struggled this much.  I haven't noticed the public putting any faith in the studio--each WDAS movie is a wait-and-see proposition and must be good in order to succeed.  Not that the Wreck-It Ralph movies aren't good, but the public don't like them as much as the others.

 

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At least Universal does a lot better job with their marketing on their animated movies.

They sell their animated features more aggressively for sure, and one reason is that these movies--on the average, mind you--don't have the legs of WDAS movies.

 

On 1/1/2019 at 8:29 AM, Omni said:

They saw some potential and desperately tried to launch the characters as much as they could. In the movie Vanellope is some kind of a princess, and Ralph is a bozo that makes people laugh with memes and viral videos. But all of that is so "artificial" (the princess thing included) that it just didn't work: it gained some initial interest (OWs are pretty strong everywhere) just to fall very quickly at the first competition.

To be fair, Vanellope was already identified as a princess in the original movie.  I do agree that the Internet concept was a bit forced for these characters, though.  I think what most people wanted was an expansion of the video game universe before getting into the Internet and things like that.  Maybe with multiple sequels a larger story could have unfolded by era, albeit the trap in such a concept is repeating the same plot over and over, like with the Toy Story movies.  This could be avoided if one is mindful of it, though.  In any case, I suspect that Rich Moore realized he'd be lucky to get just one sequel out of this franchise, so he was going to use his personal favorite Internet concept, which came too early and therefore felt forced or artificial for these characters.

 

As for the princess thing, it was fun, but felt a bit disjointed with how some of their designs were changed while others were not.  I think the designers tried to match them to the aesthetic of this universe, but some ended up looking weird.  Maybe I'm the only one this bothered, but in any case it sure didn't feel like these were the real princesses, and truth be told, they weren't--they were like weird Internet avatars of the princesses.  That's perfect for the Internet concept, but it felt phony at the same time.

 

On 2/9/2019 at 5:51 AM, MrFanaticGuy34 said:

That and the competitive Universal/Illumination’s marketing are way better because there’s more confidence in what the selling point is..and that they know what to do.

To be fair, it's easier to sell the concept when it consists primarily of bare yellow butts and random utterances of "Banana!"  You really can't go wrong with that kind of concept--it's simple enough even for marketers and the public to understand.  Quick, tell me what Frozen's tagline was.  Exactly, it didn't even have one.  It would have had one if Disney's marketers could have thought one up, but they didn't understand what they were selling, or if they did then they still didn't know how to sell it.  As usual, the movie had to sell itself, as most WDAS movies typically do.

 

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Disney can’t just rely on great goodwill from their past films to sell their next film. Marketing is important too. And that Thanksgiving-slot isn’t always encouraging when a $56M OW for ”Ralph 2” is the same number that Moana & Big Hero 6 did...just with worse legs.

Legs certainly count for the box office, and the Wreck-It Ralph movies, for whatever reasons, had weaker legs.  It's not as though Pixar movies get any better marketing--they tend to be undersold, too.

 

Quote

What’s wrong with putting your classics the summer, Disney? Other animated studios put their films there.

Disney used to regularly release WDAS movies during the summer, back in the 1990s starting with The Lion King, but I think their marketing and distribution staff consider Pixar movies stronger, and therefore better able to withstand the summer competition.  Other studios simply want the kids out-of-school-crowd so they go for the summer, but WDAS movies have to stay out of Pixar's way, so they get the November releases, which, truth be told, favor movies with strong legs anyway.

 

On 2/10/2019 at 6:37 AM, Dingdong said:

The Disney princesses scene became viral for a time, but indeed it was a wasted opportunity as it was long forgotten when the movie was released. They didn’t manage to sustain the hype from that scene. A mess.

You're right.  Although I've been trying to show that marketing wasn't completely to blame, they really messed up here.  The princess scene should have been kept as a surprise; at the very least they should have showed less of it much closer to the movie's release date.  Show just enough awesomeness to impress, show things that get people intrigued and asking questions that they really want answered, and don't show any more than this.  Whatever you do, do not scratch a particular "itch" so thoroughly so early and let people forget!

 

So far this is what the marketing for Frozen II, for example, has been getting right.  Heh, the first "full" trailer is actually shorter than the teaser!  But people are dying to know what happens in droves, and that'll get them into theaters.  For the younger children, how about another short two-minute "trailer" full of intriguing charm and cuteness this time, with a dash of the cool adult stuff at the end as a reminder?  I like the new marketing strategy so far, and it's too bad other WDAS movies could not have benefited from it.

 

On 2/11/2019 at 4:14 AM, Fullbuster said:

That's an easy one: Disney/Pixar movies have a much better animation : more detailled. Other animated movies are more simplistic in their art style, there are less things happening on screen..etc..The gap is glaring, Disney is top-notch when it comes to that, the top dog...and it has a price.

That and the fact that neither WDAS nor Pixar receive any government subsidies and/or tax breaks specifically designated for animation work, while the other major studios get one or both of those.  For example, Illumination gets paid by France to produce their animation there, Sony is paid by Canada (probably British Columbia specifically), and Blue Sky (now a wholly-owned subsidiary of Disney) gets paid by Connecticut, while California pays WDAS and Pixar nothing.  Additionally, the cost of living is very high in the Los Angeles and Bay areas, so WDAS and Pixar staffers tend to get paid more, I presume.

Edited by Melvin Frohike
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