Jump to content
cookie

Year 7 Actuals - Should You Scavenge The Long Way to Eternity while the Towering Midnight Titan Loops a Hypercompetent Megalo Birdwing around Laika's Dear Starlight Doghouse? — Let it Rip!

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

The title makes no sense and IDGAF.

 

January dropping in twenty minutes.

Edited by cookie
  • Like 3
  • Astonished 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 6-8

 

“Gateways” Opens a Portal to the New Year, “Vixen” Barely a Glimmer

 

Holdovers from a holiday season dominated by Gateways and Most Wanted Man in Great Britain ruled the box office top ten, as expected. In terms of post-holiday weekends, this one was a bit below average, with the weekend’s sole new release, Vixen and the Flaming Feather, barely falling behind in fourth place with a $6.1 million gross. With a $13.5 million production budget, “Vixen” should be in the black in the long run, but as the debut feature for a new CAYOM distributor it’s not a smash hit out of the gate, not that it was ever expected to be. The film received a “B” cinemascore with audiences, which sounds about right given the artier nature of the production.

 

  1. Gateways - $34,363,720 (-54.4%)
  2. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $20,027,982 (-27.7%)
  3. Guardians of the Internet - $6,294,962 (-47.7%)
  4. Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $6,110,765 (1st weekend)
  5. Bleach - $3,802,856 (-34.9%)
  6. Duck Hunt - $3,544,554 (-31.1%)
  7. Paradise Island - $2,882,469 (-18.7%)
  8. The Neon Psalms - $2,387,993 (-69.6%)
  9. Thawed - $2,051,529 (-61.4%)
  10. LucIId - $1,089,977 (-55.5%)

 

Top 10: $82,556,807 (-43.6%)

 


January 13-16 (Martin Luther King Jr. Weekend)

 

“Hypercompetency” Competent if Not Especially Hyper, “Father” Knows His Third Place

 

Hypercompetency outperformed every other Wachowski feature bar The Matrix sequels with a decent MLK weekend for a sci-fi tentpole. The issue, however, is that “Hyper” is its own worst enemy when it comes to its cost, and recovering the $185 million spent on it is going to prove mightily difficult without an international rescue. Still, with expectations for an opening in the 40s, “Hyper” hitting the mark should allow Blankments Productions executives to at least sleep at night. Sporting a “B+” cinemascore, word of mouth is solid enough. Praise has been laid towards “Hyper”’s action sequences, which may or may not aid holds in the long run, although the coming weeks aren’t exactly empty on other action films.

 

Serving an underserved audience, Father Knows Worst performed somewhat above expectations with a near $22 million opening over the four-day, even if it’s middle of the road for a Tyler Perry feature. Like most of Tyler Perry's work, it pleased the audience it served if no one else, scoring a “A” cinemascore.

 

  1. Hypercompetency - $42,695,011 / $50,196,110 (1st weekend)
  2. Gateways - $23,985,877 (-30.2%)
  3. Father Knows Worst - $18,841,594 / $21,938,886 (1st weekend)
  4. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $11,796,482 (-41.1%)
  5. Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $3,977,110 / $5,288,510 (-34.9%) (2nd weekend)
  6. Guardians of the Internet - $2,492,805 (-60.4%)
  7. Paradise Island - $2,228,148 (-22.7%)
  8. Bleach - $1,985,091 (-47.8%)
  9. Duck Hunt - $1,729,742 (-51.2%)
  10. The Neon Psalms - $976,689 (-59.1%)

 

Top 10 (3-day): $110,708,549 (+31.7%)

 


January 20-22

 

“Hyper” Rules by Default

 

Because not much of note came out this weekend, box office was reliant on holdovers from the MLK weekend to keep things afloat, and they did a decent if not overly impressive job at that. Hypercompetency both did and did not freeze in place during week two, in that it remained in top position, but it also didn’t crash either, dropping just over fifty percent and should be the first film of the year to gross over $100 million within a week or two.

 

The week’s lone release, Finders Keepers, found next to no audience to keep as it played to mostly empty screens this weekend. Locating a “C-” cinemascore among those who saw it, mostly due to its generic characters and unappealing premise, this Numerator Pictures dump is the first film of the year to underperform to expectations although, with a $10 million budget, the final total shouldn’t sting their wallets too much, especially when the real money lies with the Pillars of Eternity trilogy finale in two months.

 

  1. Hypercompetency - $21,060,229 (-50.7%) (2nd weekend)
  2. Gateways - $17,413,747 (-27.4%)
  3. Father Knows Worst - $10,007,119 (-46.9%) (2nd weekend)
  4. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $6,771,180 (-42.6%)
  5. Finders Keepers - $6,555,110 (1st weekend)
  6. Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $3,006,896 (-24.3%) (3rd weekend)
  7. Paradise Island - $2,807,467 (+26.0%)
  8. Duck Hunt - $1,555,038 (-10.1%)
  9. Guardians of the Internet - $1,184,082 (-52.5%)
  10. Bleach - $1,103,711 (-44.4%)

 

Top 10 gross: $71,464,579 (-35.4%)

 


January 27-29

 

“Outside” Decent on the Inside

 

A week after Finders Keepers bombed with audiences, Numerator Pictures’ other January release, Outside the Law, debuted to decent enough numbers to take the top spot. With a “B” cinemascore from moviegoing audiences, word of mouth is fairly average, which makes sense seeing how the film has often been criticized as being generic.

 

With only one release again this weekend, the box office is slowing down considerably, and next weekend looks especially grim for forecasters. Buckle up, we’re going to the Super Bowl.

 

  1. Outside the Law - $20,116,765 (1st weekend)
  2. Hypercompetency - $13,054,110 (-38.0%) (3rd weekend)
  3. Gateways - $11,911,003 (-31.6%)
  4. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $8,531,687 (+26.0%)
  5. Father Knows Worst - $6,804,110 (-32.0%) (3rd weekend)
  6. Finders Keepers - $3,351,990 (-48.9%) (2nd weekend)
  7. Paradise Island - $2,024,184 (-27.9%)
  8. Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $1,900,829 (-36.8%) (4th weekend)
  9. Duck Hunt - $785,294 (-49.5%)
  10. Bleach - $664,434 (-39.8%)

 

Top 10 gross: $69,144,406 (-3.2%)

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Y7 Vs Y6

 

January 6-8 (Y7) vs 7-9 (Y6): $82,556,807 (+5.3%)

January 13-15 (Y7) vs 14-16 (Y6) $110,708,549 (+18.1%)

January 20-22 (Y7) vs 21-23 (Y6): $71,464,579 (-12.4%)

January 27-29 (Y7) vs 28-30 (Y6): 69,144,406 (-15.2%)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hypercompetency is competent at earning box office revenue!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

February 3-5 (Super Bowl Weekend)

 

Box Office Craters During Big Game Weekend

 

Looks like audiences elected to stay home and watch the Big Game this weekend as opposed to spending much time or cash at the cinemas, and between all the film spots (much buzz surrounded anticipated releases such as The Scavenger Wars Part III, Attack on Titan, Dual Consequences, Should You Imagine?, Hilda and the Midnight Giant and the Pillars finale) and the Patriots pulling that insane fifty-point comeback in the last quarter, who can blame them?

 

Still, with the box office top ten totaling just over $40 million, that makes for one of the worst weekends in recent history, and theaters were so empty you’d be forgiven if you thought they were closed.

 

The weekend’s lone opener, the Broadway Selects version of “Burn This,” performed in line with other films in the series, if perhaps on the lower end. Still, given these are basically filmed plays produced at a budget of half a million dollars, the film could have performed a lot worse and still made a decent profit from the weekend alone.

 

  1. Outside the Law - $9,886,110 (-50.9%) (2nd weekend)
  2. Hypercompetency - $6,418,993 (-48.9%) (4th weekend)
  3. Gateways - $6,157,988 (-48.3%)
  4. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $5,212,861 (-38.9%)
  5. Broadway Selects: Burn This - $4,957,110 (1st weekend)
  6. Father Knows Worst - $3,466,792 (-49.0%) (4th weekend)
  7. Paradise Island - $1,508,017 (-25.5%)
  8. Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $1,271,870 (-33.1%) (5th weekend)
  9. Finders Keepers - $1,088,110 (-67.5%) (3rd weekend)
  10. Duck Hunt - $520,650 (-33.7%)

 

Top 10 Gross: $40,488,501 (-41.4%)

 


February 10-12

 

“Starlight” Sparkles, No Love for “Loving”

 

Horizon Entertainment and Tall Tales Animation’s debut feature Starlight shone bright over the weekend with a stellar $55 million gross, the highest debut of the year so far. With talks of the next animation following December’s Gateways seeing a pretty decent bump following the massive success of that film, “Starlight” was in a prime spot to benefit, even if it only met expectations and didn’t exceed them. Still, with an “A-” cinemascore among all audiences, and “A” for audiences under 18 years old, word of mouth is pretty positive and should ensure a total of at least $150 million ahead, especially with Valentine’s and President’s Day next weekend.

 

On the other end of the spectrum, scoring a rare “F” cinemascore, Love After Loving plunged below even the most pessimistic of predictions and debuted with just above eight million dollars at the domestic box office. The two series Loving most wanted to ape, to the point it borrowed one of their directors, Fifty Shades and Poison & Wine, titillated audiences with their taboo sequences, not horrified them. Maybe James Foley should’ve remembered that.

 

  1. Starlight - $55,796,528 (1st weekend)
  2. Love After Loving - $8,374,928 (1st weekend)
  3. Outside the Law - $7,005,994 (-29.1%) (3rd weekend)
  4. Hypercompetency - $3,798,893 (-40.8%) (5th weekend)
  5. Gateways - $3,356,104 (-45.5%)
  6. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $2,773,242 (-46.8%)
  7. Broadway Selects: Burn This - $2,745,791 (-44.6%) (2nd weekend)
  8. Father Knows Worst - $2,607,119 (-24.8%) (5th weekend)
  9. Paradise Island - $1,195,857 (-20.7%)
  10. Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $589,779 (-53.6%) (6th weekend)

 

Top 10 gross: $88,243,635 (+117.9%)

 


February 17-20 (President Day’s Weekend)

 

“Plastic” Fantastic

 

Endless Entertainment’s streak of successful DC superhero fare continues as Plastic Man claims the President’s Day weekend and the highest opening gross of Year 7 as of yet. Despite average reviews, audience craving for zany comic book action remained as high as ever (and resulted in an “A-” cinemascore from moviegoers), and between this and the upcoming Green Lantern sequel, Endless’ superhero division should see a lot green (pun intended) this year.

 

New Journey Pictures’ historical biopic Carver, obviously based on the life of George Washington Carver, also saw a decent debut over the holiday, and managed to outdo middling reviews and score an incredible “A+” cinemascore among its target audience, although, being a Lee Daniels biopic, it was always going to have more appeal among moviegoers than necessarily with critics.

 

  1. Plastic Man - $60,106,791 / $71,881,002 (1st weekend)
  2. Starlight - $33,532,978 / $43,885,389 (-39.9%) (2nd weekend)
  3. Carver - $13,779,010 / $17,001,779 (1st weekend)
  4. Outside the Law - $4,886,357 / $5,725,117 (-30.5%) (4th weekend)
  5. Love After Loving - $3,115,088 / $3,500,136 (-62.8%) (2nd weekend)
  6. Hypercompetency - $2,701,779 / $3,322,887 (-28.9%) (6th weekend)
  7. Gateways - $2,691,595 (-19.8%)
  8. Father Knows Worst - $2,189,807 / $2,601,898 (-16.0%) (6th weekend)
  9. Broadway Selects: Burn This - $2,166,066 / $2,539,220 (-21.1%) (3rd weekend)
  10. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $1,508,644 (-45.6%)

 

Top 10 gross: $126,658,115 (+43.5%)

 


February 24-26

 

“Conventional” Wisdom Can’t Beat Plastic

 

Continuing the streak of action films debuting during the winter months, the sequel to Conventional Wisdom, Conventionally Wiser, did outdo its predecessor, but not by a whole lot. Some have laid this at the more middling response compared to its forebearer, and with a “B+” cinemascore from audiences, it might sound like they don’t necessarily disagree. Whether it’ll outgross “Wisdom” remains to be seen, especially with multiple more action films looming on the horizon.

 

In any case, it failed to defeat Plastic Man, which saw a fairly standard drop for a superhero film and took the top spot, even if it looked like it’d be a much closer race after Friday estimates.

 

At number five, the Director’s Cut re-release of the second Scavenger Wars film debuted to expectations, benefiting from releasing in premium formats and including an exclusive preview for the third entry ready to storm theaters this summer. As it is a re-release, no exit polling was made.

 

If anyone wonders what happened to Love After Loving after its poor hold over the President’s Day week, it made only $775,011 this weekend, which translates to a 75% drop in business. Major ouch.

 

  1. Plastic Man - $26,779,001 (-55.4%) (2nd weekend)
  2. Conventionally Wiser - $24,689,733 (1st weekend)
  3. Starlight - $19,557,977 (-41.7%) (3rd weekend)
  4. Carver - $7,105,879 (-48.4%) (2nd weekend)
  5. The Scavenger Wars Part II: Director’s Cut - $7,194,336 (1st weekend)
  6. Hypercompetency - $2,285,447 (-15.4%) (7th weekend)
  7. Outside the Law - $2,055,681 (-57.9%) (5th weekend)
  8. Paradise Island - $1,929,587 (+114.0%)
  9. The Most Wanted Man in Great Britain - $1,719,854 (+14.0%)
  10. Gateways - $1,676,864 (-37.7%)

 

Top 10 gross: $94,994,359 (-25.0%) 

Edited by cookie
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January PTAs

Hypercompetency - $11,001/$12,934

Outside the Law - $6,521

Father Knows Worst - $4,978/$5,796

Vixen and the Flaming Feather - $2,744

Finders Keepers - $2,085

 

February PTAs

Plastic Man - $14,397/$17,217

Starlight - $13,206

Conventionally Wiser - $7,060

Carver - $5,652/$6,974

The Scavenger Wars Part II: Director's Cut - $2,998

Love After Loving - $2,554

Broadway Selects: Burn This - $2,215

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

March 3-5

 

“Doghouse” Gets Thrown a Bone

 

The David Fincher soap opera drama In The Doghouse took the top spot with an expected $30 million opening. As the first feature from Phoenix Fire Entertainment with any decent box office prospects (Vixen was always going to be a low-key performer, and this outlet refuses to call Love After Loving a “feature”), hitting expectations should be considered a victory if nothing else. While some loftier predictions pegged it to open above Fincher’s own Gone Girl, “Doghouse” simply didn’t have the traction to open that high, and with mixed reviews is unlikely to have the same staying power (audiences awarded it a “B-”), but the lack of similar fare in the coming months should help carry legs to an extent.

 

Business continued as usual below “Doghouse,” although Conventionally Wiser slipped to fourth place below Starlight and Carver continued its strong run.

 

  1. In the Doghouse - $30,744,077 (1st weekend)
  2. Plastic Man - $15,046,875 (-43.8%) (3rd weekend)
  3. Starlight - $13,101,786 (-33.0%) (4th weekend)
  4. Conventionally Wiser - $11,099,778 (-55.0%) (2nd weekend)
  5. Carver - $5,420,787 (-23.7%) (3rd weekend)
  6. The Scavenger Wars Part II: Director’s Cut - $3,185,668 (-55.7%) (2nd weekend)
  7. Outside the Law - $1,266,796 (-38.4%) (6th weekend)
  8. Hypercompetency - $1,250,893 (-45.3%) (8th weekend)
  9. Paradise Island - $1,142,316 (-40.8%)
  10. Gateways - $947,428 (-43.5%)

 

Top 10 gross: $83,206,404 (-12.4%)


 

March 10-12

 

“Higher Ground” More of a Gentle Slope

 

With mixed reviews and a “C-” score from moviegoers, New Journey Pictures’ Higher Ground slid below even the lowest of expectations (most forecasts pegged an opening between $25 to 35 million) with a gross of only just over $20 million. Drawing from the disaster genre which was hugely successful a few years ago (see The Towering Inferno and Cataclysmic) but has stalled in recent times due to a lack of appealing fare, “Ground” was the latest to be, well… grounded at the box office, pardon the pun. Audience criticism seems to stem from the fact that the “disaster” aspect was overhyped, and the rest of the film took a turn that left viewers on a sour note. With the Pillars trilogy finale arriving just a week from now, the question is if “Ground” could even reach a $60 million total gross, but with a $50m budget and likely more forgiving international markets, the end result shouldn’t sting too bad for the studio.

 

Down at number five, the Cardi B concert film Dazzling opened to standard concert film numbers. Because the audience attending these are fans, the doc received an “A” cinemascore almost by default.

 

  1. Higher Ground - $20,432,079 (1st weekend)
  2. In the Doghouse - $17,440,669 (-43.3%) (2nd weekend)
  3. Starlight - $10,350,884 (-20.1%) (5th weekend)
  4. Plastic Man - $10,334,885 (-31.3%) (4th weekend)
  5. Dazzling - $7,196,797 (1st weekend)
  6. Conventionally Wiser - $6,796,237 (-38.8%) (3rd weekend)
  7. Carver - $4,557,206 (-15.9%) (4th weekend)
  8. The Scavenger Wars Part II: Director’s Cut - $1,800,445 (-43.5%) (3rd weekend)
  9. Hypercompetency - $897,116 (-28.3%) (9th weekend)
  10. Outside the Law - $860,009 (-32.1%) (7th weekend)

 

Top 10 gross: $80,666,327 (-3.1%)


 

March 17-19

 

“Pillars” Leaves Box Office Legacy

 

When they say “beware the Ides of March,” what they really mean is “watch out for Ana De Armas,” for her breakout fantasy franchise Pillars of Eternity is reaching new heights at the box office this weekend, grossing a staggering $155 million over three days, handily scoring the second biggest opening weekend for a Spring release behind last year’s Spark finale, and unquestionably the highest of Year 7, likely to stick until when the third Scavenger Wars film bows this summer.

 

How does one explain this opening? Obviously, audience trust in the brand is high, but a factor not often considered is that “Legacy” is the first real live-action event film at the box office since the “Spark” finale, and is the first film since Numerator Pictures’ own Mass Effect: Ascension to open to over $100 million. Simply put, it’s been a long, underwhelming summer and a holiday frame dominated by Gateways to get to this point, and blockbuster audiences were simply craving for a major tentpole to rally around. Of course, it helps that “Pillars” is the de facto high fantasy franchise in CAYOM, especially when potential competitors outside of He-Man either stumbled out of the gate or have yet to take off, leaving “Pillars” to fulfill another itch audiences have in a blockbuster landscape dominated by space operas and cartoons about imagination and portals.

 

Plus, looking at Odyssey and Spark, audiences simply love conclusions. With an “A” cinemascore, audience approval is high, and means the run for a domestic total over $400 million is on.

 

“Pillars” certainly took a massive toll at the remaining box office this weekend. Last week’s openers, Higher Ground and Dazzling, both tumbled over seventy percent each. Major ouch.

 

  1. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $155,079,111 (1st weekend)
  2. In the Doghouse - $9,766,107 (-44.0%) (3rd weekend)
  3. Higher Ground - $6,095,177 (-70.1%) (2nd weekend)
  4. Starlight - $5,107,696 (-50.7%) (6th weekend)
  5. Plastic Man - $4,643,077 (-55.1%) (5th weekend)
  6. Carver - $3,497,197 (-23.3%) (5th weekend)
  7. Conventionally Wiser - $3,055,831 (-55.0%) (4th weekend)
  8. Dazzling - $2,103,796 (-70.8%) (2nd weekend)
  9. The Scavenger Wars Part II: Director’s Cut - $720,115 (-60.0%) (4th weekend)
  10. Hypercompetency - $387,105 (-56.9%) (10th weekend)

 

Top 10 gross: $190,455,212 (+136.1%)


 

March 24-26

 

”Pillars” Stand Tall Still

 

With very little in the way of competition, Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy saw the expect drop for a major tentpole opener and claimed the top spot a second time with a gross over $65 million, which is more than what the previous Y7 opening record holder, Plastic Man, did in its first three days. With audiences returning from Spring Break, it remains to be seen if "Pillars" can hold on for much longer, but it’s on a good track still.

 

The openers are honestly nothing to write home about, even if Hoops 3 scored the largest debut in its series. With “Hoops” and The Last Fifer: Portrait of a Clarinetist both receiving an “A” cinemascore, they obviously pleased the audiences they served.

 

Curiously, Dazzling saw another drop above seventy percent this weekend. Guess audiences don’t like them thicc as much as we thought.

 

  1. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $65,443,779 (-57.8%) (2nd weekend)
  2. Hoops 3 - $11,006,972 (1st weekend)
  3. In the Doghouse - $6,820,195 (-30.1%) (4th weekend)
  4. The Last Fifer: Portrait of a Clarinetist - $4,065,101 (1st weekend)
  5. Starlight - $4,006,795 (-21.6%) (7th weekend)
  6. Plastic Man - $3,701,796 (-20.3%) (6th weekend)
  7. Higher Ground - $3,007,682 (-50.7%) (3rd weekend)
  8. Carver - $2,966,206 (-15.2%) (6th weekend)
  9. Conventionally Wiser - $1,733,005 (-43.3%) (5th weekend)
  10. Dazzling - $587,010 (-72.1%) (3rd weekend)

 

Top 10 gross: $103,338,541 (-45.7%)


 

March 31-April 2

 

“Beyblade” Wobbly, But Spins on Top

 

While it didn’t meet its loftier expectations, the mouthful Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! came out on top over the third Pillars entry, although with previews factored in (estimated around $2.5 million), Sarana and crew actually won the Friday-Saturday-Sunday stretch in raw dollars. Still, while it didn’t perform to curious predictions that pegged it in the vicinity of Ready Player One or Kong: Skull Island, it still outperformed past March follies such as John Carter and Pacific Rim: Uprising. Question remains if the highly divisive film can have enough steam to reach the coveted $100 million mark, especially with a strongly negative fan reaction (it’s not much of a Beyblade film, let's not beat that around the bush) and a divided “B” cinemascore among audiences, but the Robert Rodriguez directed sci-fi action tentpole should turn a profit with international revenues included.

 

  1. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $36,154,066 (1st weekend)
  2. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $35,301,886 (-46.1%) (3rd weekend)
  3. Hoops 3 - $5,900,762 (-46.4%) (2nd weekend)
  4. In the Doghouse - $4,311,879 (-36.8%) (5th weekend)
  5. The Last Fifer: Portrait of a Clarinetist - $3,085,155 (-24.1%) (2nd weekend)
  6. Carver - $2,415,387 (-18.5%) (7th weekend)
  7. Starlight - $2,411,879 (-39.8%) (8th weekend)
  8. Plastic Man - $2,085,119 (-43.7%) (7th weekend)
  9. Higher Ground - $1,312,735 (-56.3%) (4th weekend)
  10. Conventionally Wiser - $812,779 (-53.1%) (6th weekend)

 

Top 10: $93,791,647 (-9.0%)

Edited by cookie
  • Like 5
  • Astonished 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carver is so leggy, it's not even funny...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not expect it go that high. Should cross 400m with legs improving through April

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

April 7-10 (Easter Weekend)

 

”Hilda” Suitably Giant over Easter

 

Scoring over $97 million throughout the four-day Easter frame, Hilda and the Midnight Giant scored the second highest debut of Year 7 as of yet, and just in terms of a three-day return is higher than December’s Gateways, although being in a different time of year obviously makes any direct comparisons difficult, and expecting “Hilda” to match the astounding domestic gross of “Gateways” is obviously unreasonable.

 

So what happened? Early Good Friday estimates pegged the film at a debut closer to $70 million, but as the day progressed, comparisons moved from Zootopia to the 2016 remake of Disney’s Jungle Book, as “Hilda” kept growing in size throughout the evening and later into Easter Saturday. Part of this can be attributed to a factor that may have been somewhat neglected when it came to predicting “Gateways” as well, and that was their respective appeal with young girls, so far a fairly underserved audience in Year 7 (the previous animated feature to debut, Starlight, aimed much more at boys). Not that “Hilda” did not appeal to the opposite sex as well, but analysts notice a strong appeal among young female audiences with relatable young female characters like Bailee and Hilda.

 

Strong reviews (so far an 85 on the critical aggregate) correlated with an “A” among parents and an “A+” among viewers under the age of 18 led to somewhat of a perfect storm as the weekend progressed, especially with families looking for an escape over the somewhat hectic Easter period. Of course, with the film’s reported intense moments it carried appeal among general audiences as well, and with much praise being lobbied at the animation and character work from both critics and audiences, ensured Cookie Pictures Animation, a studio division struggling to get any project off the ground since the McDuck franchise saw its untimely end, finally had the winner it so desperately needed.

 

Down in third, the poorly received horror sequel Father II: Resurrection still managed to moderately beat expectations and gross over $22 million over the four days. Maybe some audiences were just looking for some trashy fun, or perhaps confused Christian audiences flocked to the film thinking it was going to be very different than what it turned out to be. Whichever the case, with bootleg clips of the film’s already infamous finale racking up views online, the film is pretty much benefiting from the old adage that any publicity is good publicity. With a “C-” cinemascore from audiences, legs are hardly going to be pretty, but having already covered its $15 million budget, it doesn’t have to be.

 

As for everything else, films such as Pillars of Eternity and Beyblade saw softer drops than expected given what they were up against, possibly attributed to the holiday. Carver, which has so far had a quietly incredible run, even increased this weekend due to stopover business from religious audiences.

 

How drops will look like after Easter remains to be seen, but various studios can be relieved to know that, right now, it’s more of a feast than a famine.

 

  1. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $85,012,664 / $97,520,849 (1st week)
  2. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $22,264,111 / $24,690,779 (-36.9%) (4th weekend)
  3. Father II: Resurrection - $20,555,230 / $22,505,764 (1st week)
  4. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $17,055,305 / $18,943,024 (-52.8%) (2nd weekend)
  5. Hoops 3 - $3,917,935 / $4,997,468 (-33.6%) (3rd weekend)
  6. In the Doghouse - $2,855,066 / $3,135,771 (-33.8%) (6th weekend)
  7. Carver - $2,710,669 / $3,002,767 (+12.3%) (8th weekend)
  8. The Last Fifer: Portrait of a Clarinetist - $2,501,842 / $2,753,778 (-18.9%) (3rd weekend)
  9. Plastic Man - $1,585,893 / $1,715,792 (-23.9%) (8th weekend)
  10. Starlight - $1,105,872 / $1,268,692 (-54.1%) (9th weekend)

 

Top 10: $159,564,587 (+70.1%)

 


April 14-16

 

“Hilda” Towers Again, “Vengeance” Liam Neesons, ”Leopards” Fifth

 

As expected, Hilda and the Midnight Giant remained at the top spot for a second week, dropping an impressive thirty seven percent in its second week and being the second film this year, after Pillars of Eternity, to have a sophomore frame over $50 million. Not that competition was ever anticipated to make much of a dent on it, but it’s a very strong hold nonetheless and points to excellent word of mouth among families and general audiences.

 

Coming in second was the Liam Neeson thriller Vengeance, which opened almost exactly to expectations, give or take a few million. Scoring mixed reviews and a “B+” cinemascore, it remains to be seen how high it can climb on the Liam Neeson scale, but with a sensible $35m budget and perhaps some Asian appeal due to its setting, it should be solidly profitable for Numerator Pictures.

 

Snow Leopards, the documentary about the best animal, opened to nearly $10 million and received an “A” from moviegoers. Animal documentaries are one of the safest bets in CAYOM when it comes to making a minor profit, and with Earth Day next weekend, it should stick around for a short while before it craters completely.

 

On the lower end of the scale, a lot of theaters started spring cleaning this weekend, and some films such as In the Doghouse and Carver saw heftier drops as theaters saved those screens for either new openers or better performing films.

 

  1. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $53,019,833 (-37.6%) (2nd weekend)
  2. Vengeance - $20,833,103 (1st weekend)
  3. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $14,518,797 (-34.7%) (5th weekend)
  4. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let It Rip! - $10,015,220 (-41.3%) (3rd weekend)
  5. Snow Leopards - $9,520,554 (1st weekend)
  6. Father II: Resurrection - $5,510,330 (-73.2%) (2nd weekend)
  7. Hoops 3 - $2,555,879 (-34.8%) (4th weekend)
  8. The Last Fifer: Portrait of a Clarinetist - $1,810,744 (-27.6%) (4th weekend)
  9. In the Doghouse - $1,577,224 (-44.8%) (7th weekend)
  10. Carver - $1,515,729 (-44.1%) (9th weekend)

 

Top 10: $120,577,413 (-24.4%)

 


April 21-23

 

“Hilda” Wins Busy Weekend, “Looping” Laps Around “Bug Wars”

 

Typically, this part of April is when the box office slows down considerably, but between Hilda and the Midnight Giant rocking at the top once again and both Looping and Monster Bug Wars outdoing expectations, it was actually much busier than the time of year usually is, and all three films and even a few holdovers below them (see Snow Leopards and Into the Doghouse, though the latter was due to Bug Wars double features) actually benefited.

 

Blankments Productions’ Looping, in part thanks to strong reviews, scored an “A” cinemascore among audiences and an opening of over $35 million. That’s very impressive for a sci-fi drama, some forecasters attributing it to the star power of Odysseus himself, Hugh Jackman, being involved and driving up audience interest. Being one of a kind in the current marketplace, and a well received one to boot, should imply that Looping has a lot of laps left to make.

 

Below them, the schlock critter fest Monster Bug Wars opened not far behind Looping, with some forecasters attributing to audiences looking for some trashy monster action after having done their taxes the week prior — the logic may not entirely square there, but bear with us. Scoring mostly middling reviews, but not overly disastrous, Bug Wars could reach past $90 million, but fierce competition ahead from the action crowd may dampen those chances. The film scored a “B+” cinemascore, indicating average word of mouth.

 

  1. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $38,750,230 (-26.9%) (3rd weekend)
  2. Looping - $35,305,783 (1st weekend)
  3. Monster Bug Wars - $34,230,226 (1st weekend)
  4. Vengeance - $11,276,196 (-45.9%) (2nd weekend)
  5. Snow Leopards - $9,770,119 (+6.0%) (2nd weekend)
  6. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $9,105,789 (-37.3%) (6th weekend)
  7. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $5,189,781 (-48.2%) (4th weekend)
  8. In the Doghouse - $1,661,879 (+5.4%) (8th weekend)
  9. Hoops 3 - $1,550,924 (-39.3%) (5th weekend)
  10. Father II: Resurrection - $1,526,666 (-72.3%) (3rd weekend)

 

Top 10: $148,367,593 (+23.0%)

 


April 28-30

 

Mediocre Offerings Contribute to Fairly Strong Business at Spring’s End

 

With a very strong April on its last legs, business was still at a high as audiences returned to theaters for another go around of their favorite films. Hilda took the top spot a fourth time, ending the very lucrative month flying past the $250 million mark, but the makers of Looping should not be deterred, for the drama scored a second weekend drop of only just over thirty percent. A drop that strong would indicate flying word of mouth, and it’s reasonable to expect both “Looping” and “Hilda” to stick around for the long haul.

 

The weekend’s new offerings, however, were anything but bright. I’ll Always Be There made moderate returns for a drama with middling reviews, and should be able to cover its $30 million production budget, even if it may have to turn to home video and streaming revenue to see much profit. Scoring a “B+” cinemascore, word of mouth is at least decent.

 

The terribly received Whoopsie-Daisy, however, staunchly underperformed at the box office, grossing less than $9 million and setting a career low for star Melissa McCarthey. Mixing a poorly thought out premise with hijinks so juvenile even Disney Junior would tell you to grow up, "Daisy" was a comedy that ultimately appealed to no one, and thus, among the few who saw it, scored a “C-” cinemascore. Figures.

 

Speaking of milestones, the Pillars of Eternity finale crossed the very coveted $400 million mark this weekend, the first live-action tentpole since Spark: A Hero's Promise to do so.

 

  1. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $30,570,130 (-21.1%) (4th weekend)
  2. Looping - $24,478,405 (-30.7%) (2nd weekend)
  3. Monster Bug Wars - $17,288,057 (-49.5%) (2nd weekend)
  4. I’ll Always Be There - $12,744,894 (1st weekend)
  5. Whoopsie-Daisy - $8,752,069 (1st weekend)
  6. Vengeance - $8,010,893 (-29.0%) (3rd weekend)
  7. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $7,011,792 (-23.0%) (7th weekend)
  8. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $3,836,101 (-26.1%) (5th weekend)
  9. Snow Leopards - $2,955,110 (-69.8%) (3rd weekend)
  10. Hoops 3 - $1,100,693 (-29.0%) (6th weekend)

 

Top 10: $116,748,144 (-21.3%)

Edited by cookie
  • Like 3
  • Astonished 4
  • ...wtf 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Father II fell out of the Ten remarkably fast...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

So I did some calculations for Hilda vs CYI? as both had similar reviews and what not and Hilda is outpacing it by 3% at the same point in time at around $255M-$260M whereas CYI? was at $248M-$253M, however with Summer as well as the benefit of no competition between the stretch of STT2 and SYI?, it should cross 400M especially with the weekend it fights STT2 happens to be Mother’s Day.

 

Hilda will likely be the biggest animated film of Y7, when all things are said and done.

Edited by YourMother the Edgelord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

March PTAs

 

Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $36,438

Beyblade: The War Unleashed - Let Them Rip! - $9,185

In the Doghouse - $9,040

Higher Ground - $6,486

Hoops 3 - $3,823

Dazzling - $2,937

The Last Fifer: Portrait of a Clarinetist - $2,692

 

April PTAs

 

Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $20,241/$23,219

Looping - $10,332

Monster Bug Wars - $9,039

Vengeance - $6,472

Father II: The Resurrection - $5,610/$6,139

I'll Always Be There - $3,983

Snow Leopards - $3,886

Whoopsie-Daisy - $3,242

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

May 5-7

 

“Dual” Consequential

 

Scoring better than other Spring Cruise missile entries such as Oblivion and Mission: Impossible III, Dual Consequences kicked off May on a respectable note with a $53 million gross. Covering its $100 million production cost will be a cakewalk, especially with Cruise remaining a strong sell overseas, but whether it’ll have enough steam to reach $150 million is unclear. Compared to other action fare like Beyblade and Monster Bug Wars from earlier this spring, however, it’s a much clearer win. With a “B+” cinemascore, audience word of mouth was on the positive end.

 

As the weekend’s lone new release, business below it continued mostly as usual, save for a few action-heavy films seeing a noticeable impact.

 

  1. Dual Consequences - $53,440,679 (1st weekend)
  2. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $23,320,695 (-23.7%) (5th weekend)
  3. Looping - $18,076,931 (-26.2%) (3rd weekend)
  4. Monster Bug Wars - $7,888,120 (-54.3%) (3rd weekend)
  5. I’ll Always Be There - $7,400,693 (-41.9%) (2nd weekend)
  6. Vengeance - $4,017,559 (-49.8%) (4th weekend)
  7. Whoopsie-Daisy - $4,010,694 (-54.2%) (2nd weekend)
  8. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $3,301,778 (-52.9%) (8th weekend)
  9. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $1,809,786 (-52.8%) (6th weekend)
  10. Snow Leopards - $1,687,156 (-42.9%) (4th weekend)

 

Top 10 gross: $124,954,091 (+7.0%)

 


May 12-14

 

“Thymes” Drums Up Increased Box Office Support

 

Shining Star Animation’s sequel to the popular Sir Thymes Time from two and a half years ago provided a good boost to early summer with a $75 million domestic opening. Even if reviews were more on the mixed side compared to its predecessor, lack of family competition until late June’s Should You Imagine? and an “A-” from audiences should ensure that "Thymes 2" more than handily outgrosses its forebearer.

 

While likely boosted from drive-in couplings with "Thymes", perhaps the real story this weekend was Looping dropping under ten percent in its fourth frame. Having now grossed over $120 million and with a lot of steam left in it, don’t be surprised if the film eclipses $180 million domestic before its run is over.

 

  1. Sir Thymes Time 2 - $75,770,220 (1st weekend)
  2. Dual Consequences - $25,675,292 (-52.0%) (2nd weekend)
  3. Looping - $16,593,975 (-8.2%) (4th weekend)
  4. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $15,033,694 (-35.5%) (6th weekend)
  5. I’ll Always Be There - $5,199,778 (-29.7%) (3rd weekend)
  6. Monster Bug Wars - $4,204,787 (-46.7%) (4th weekend)
  7. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $2,098,667 (-36.4%) (9th weekend)
  8. Vengeance - $2,055,878 (-48.8%) (5th weekend)
  9. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $1,930,779 (+6.7%) (7th weekend)
  10. Whoopsie-Daisy - $1,398,550 (-65.1%) (3rd weekend)

 

Top 10: $149,961,620 (+18.1%)

 


May 19-21

 

“Fatal” Attractive, “Cruis’n” Bruis’n

 

Alpha Pictures’ remake of Fatal Attraction, on top of scoring an “A-” cinemascore, opened over $40 million during a moderately busy pre-Memorial day frame. Between franchise sequels and Tom Cruise doing his silly run cycle, "Fatal Attraction" positioned itself as the adult (film) in the room, basically, and with the iconic name attached to it drew instant audience interest, especially when it’s Kevin Crumb himself in the obsessed stalker role. With strong reviews from multiple outlets and strong audience word of mouth to boot, forecasters expect “Attraction” to join the ranks of Carver, Hilda and the Midnight Giant and Looping as the lords of box office staying power in Y7, but with multiple films aiming for adult audiences coming in June and beyond, the future could turn on a dime, much like McAvoy’s spine-tingling antagonist.

 

In third, the video game adaptation Cruis’n somewhat outperformed its moderate expectations and delivered a pretty decent result for a car film on a $60m budget. It obviously won’t join the ranks of The Fast & The Furious or even last year’s Off-Road, but with New Journey Pictures having a very mixed time at the box office so far this year, "Cruis’n," with its “B+” cinemascore, should be seen as a win.

 

  1. Fatal Attraction - $40,167,385 (1st weekend)
  2. Sir Thymes Time 2 - $37,905,191 (-50.0%) (2nd weekend)
  3. Cruis’n - $30,766,156 (1st weekend)
  4. Dual Consequences - $14,345,738 (-44.1%) (3rd weekend)
  5. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $12,028,512 (-21.4%) (7th weekend)
  6. Looping - $10,076,681 (-39.3%) (5th weekend)
  7. I’ll Always Be There - $2,450,156 (-52.3%) (4th weekend)
  8. Monster Bug Wars - $2,097,565 (-50.1%) (5th weekend)
  9. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $1,511,386 (-28.0%) (10th weekend)
  10. Beyblade: The War Unleashed — Let it Rip! - $750,127 (-61.1%) (8th weekend)

 

Top 10: $152,098,897 (+1.4%)

 


May 26-29 (Memorial Day Weekend)

 

“Call of Duty” Navigates the Storm, But Faces Slight Losses

 

Audiences still turned out for the third entry in the Call of Duty series, but the squadron slightly depleted compared to Y5’s Of Their Own Accord. Eye of the Storm, adapting the third entry in the Modern Warfare series, still conquered over $77 million through the 4-day holiday frame though, taking the top spot with flying colors and proving that the franchise is remaining as stable as its average review trend.

 

It’s that stability that may explain why “Storm” isn’t increasing from its predecessor, whereas that wasn’t the case with the third Pillars film two months prior. Audiences know what they get from these films by now, and with Modern Warfare 3 being less iconic of a game to adapt from than Modern Warfare 2, the novelty has lessened. This may ultimately be where the franchise plateaus, but the fact that it’s held on for so long and not faltered despite not leaving much of an impression with critics or audiences outside of fans should be commended. Scoring a “B+” cinemascore, Numerator Pictures is banking on claiming as much revenue as they can before the third entry in the Scavenger Wars series arrives in three weeks, and a domestic total over $150 million should still be in the clear.

 

Owl City’s Flying High did score ten million fireflies— er, dollars over the 4-day, receiving an “A” cinemascore, expected for a concert doc.

 

  1. Call of Duty: Eye of the Storm - $61,520,196 / $77,065,788 (1st weekend)
  2. Fatal Attraction - $27,109,778 / $33,911,386 (-32.5%) (2nd weekend)
  3. Sir Thymes Time 2 - $23,934,707 / $31,520,797 (-36.9%) (3rd weekend)
  4. Cruis’n - $14,577,974 / $18,272,200 (-52.6%) (2nd weekend)
  5. Hilda and the Midnight Giant - $9,744,795 / $13,841,568 (-19.0%) (8th weekend)
  6. Looping - $8,335,779 / $10,394,750 (-17.3%) (6th weekend)
  7. Flying High - $8,150,778 / $10,201,776 (1st weekend)
  8. Dual Consequences - $7,004,977 / $8,740,776 (-51.2%) (4th weekend)
  9. I’ll Always Be There - $1,801,776 / $2,205,358 (-26.5%) (5th weekend)
  10. Pillars of Eternity: An Ancient Legacy - $1,575,107 / $1,938,786 (+4.2%) (9th weekend)

 

Top 10: $163,755,867 (+7.7%)

Edited by cookie
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 5/13/2020 at 11:13 AM, YourMother the Edgelord said:

Y7 Vs Y6

 

January 6-8 (Y7) vs 7-9 (Y6): $82,556,807 (+5.3%)

January 13-15 (Y7) vs 14-16 (Y6) $110,708,549 (+18.1%)

January 20-22 (Y7) vs 21-23 (Y6): $71,464,579 (-12.4%)

January 27-29 (Y7) vs 28-30 (Y6): 69,144,406 (-15.2%)

Y7 vs Y6


February

3-5 (Y7): $40,488,501 vs 4-6 (Y6): $71,989,040 (-43.8%)

10-12 (Y7): $88,243,635 vs 11-13 (Y6): $71,278,640 (+23.8%)

17-19 (Y7): $126,658,115 vs 18-20 (Y6): $159,796,598 (-20.7%)

24-26 (Y7): $94,994,359 vs 25-27 (Y6): $74,785,501 (+27%)

 

Top 10 February monthly comparison: (Y7): $313,994,610 vs (Y6): $377,849,779 (-16.9%)

Edited by YourMother the Edgelord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Y7 vs Y6

 

March:

3-5 (Y7): $83,206,494 vs 4-6 (Y6): $284,051,475 (-70.7%)

10-12 (Y7): $80,666,327 vs 11-13 (Y6): $155,200,204 (-48.1%)

17-19 (Y7): $190,455,212 vs 18-20 (Y6): $122,781,075 (+55.1%)

24-26 (Y7): $103,338,541 vs 25-27 (Y6): $77,503,708 (+33.3%)

 

April:

March 31st-April 2nd (Y7): $93,791,647 vs April 1st-3rd (Y6): $154,183,340 (-39.2%)

7-9 (Y7): $159,564,587 vs 8-10 (Y6): $126,125,722

14-16 (Y7): $120,577,413 vs 15-17 (Y6): $118,618,994

21-23 (Y7): $148,367,593 vs 22-24 (Y6): $100,958,905

28-30 (Y7): $116,748,144 vs 29-May 1st (Y6): $77,495,174

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Guidelines. Feel free to read our Privacy Policy as well.