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The Panda

BOT's Top 100 Movies of All Time - Hindsight is 2020 Edition

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Truman Show... what a movie and what a performance by Jim Carrey. Even more relevant today if you ask me. Keeps on aging like fine wine.

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Some more of the films right on the edge!

 

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"Some something jizzing all over that screen while the old lady sat and watched.  Damien Jizzelle." - @Ethan Hunt

 

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"Wonderful movie" - @4815162342

 

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"how is this possible? same director, same screenwritter, same actors, same composer, how could this be any better than the previous two movies? It was, it was so much better that I can't describe in words, it's not perfect cause it had some awful lines, but it's near perfection. I believe in miracles now." - @Goffe

 

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"This is the best film of 2009 and ranks among the greatest science fiction films of all time. It paints a fierce portrait of racism, prejudice, and war while never becoming too preachy. It's thrilling, emotional, and thought-provoking. Plus, it features such a powerful leading performance and the last shot of the film is wonderful." - @Noctis

 

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"A new addition to my top 10 movies of all time.

 

When the movie started, I thought I might only appreciate it on an intellectual level. I thought the narration was corny and the acting was hackneyed. However, once Norma Desmond appears on screen, the movie really gets started. This character is a screen icon, but not for the reasons she would understand.  And knowing many of these characters are played by real-life counterparts, like an actual silent film star Gloria Swanson playing Desmond, makes the film seem immediate and relevant even 60 years later.  The film is suspenseful even if it gives away the climax at the beginning! Quite an accomplishment." - @cannastop

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Holy motherfucking shit, SUNSET BOULEVARD didn’t make it?

 

You goddamn heathens. 

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I hate all of you.

 

 

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Just now, Plain Old Tele said:

Holy motherfucking shit, SUNSET BOULEVARD didn’t make it?

 

You goddamn heathens. 

I have never seen that but I have seen CARS 2 around four times in my life

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2 minutes ago, Plain Old Tele said:

Y’all just gonna fuck Steve McQueen like that too?

I voted for WIDOWZ

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3 minutes ago, Blankments said:

I have never seen that but I have seen CARS 2 around four times in my life


den mas xezeis, Blanks? Someone ban this man.

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9 minutes ago, Plain Old Tele said:

Holy motherfucking shit, SUNSET BOULEVARD didn’t make it?

 

You goddamn heathens. 

I was going to complain about Sunset Boulevard not making the top 100, but then I remembered I forget to put it on my list. I'm sorry. :(

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Just now, Plain Old Tele said:

den mas xezeis, Blanks? Someone ban this man.

@Blankments is threadbanned for the next twenty-four seconds due to having terrible taste. 

 

There.  Done.  

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9 hours ago, Plain Old Tele said:

THE SHINING isn’t great. 

 

Never thought one of the lousiest, most ludicrous hot takes of 2020 would come from you, Tele.

 

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3 Russo Brothers films among 100 best films ever (and 4 among top 200). Nothing to argue if people like them so much, but it is an incredible achievement for two unknown brothers just 6-7 years ago.

 

And to see Paths of glory, A night at the opera, The quiet man, The Sting or Once upon a time in America (this really hurts me) ranking beyond the #200 spot is really disturbing.

Edited by peludo
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3 hours ago, Plain Old Tele said:

Y’all just gonna fuck Steve McQueen like that too?

#ReleaseTheDaltonCut

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The Russo brothers are more competent and accomplished than the Coen bros.

 

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3 hours ago, Plain Old Tele said:

Holy motherfucking shit, SUNSET BOULEVARD didn’t make it?

 

You goddamn heathens. 

I've pretty easily seen 100 movies I find better. Altho I'll concede that SB deserves to make the list more than a lot of the movies that have been revealed as the top 250 so far.

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7 hours ago, Jake Gittes said:

I've pretty easily seen 100 movies I find worse. SB deserves to make the list more the movies that have been revealed as the top 250 so far.

FTFY!!!!!!!!

 


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god. This charActer study. 
 

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so tragic and horrific at the same time. 
 

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and only really horrific cause she is what Hollywood fears the most: women over forty. 
 

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I am so sorry, Norma. I tried. I had you at #7.

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Norma is an effective movie character but she's pretty one-dimensional. Not really a problem with the movie, which I see not so much as a character study as a deliberately exaggerated perverse cautionary tale. Had it wanted to be more effective as the former, it would've made her a more complex and dynamic human being rather than this outsized grotesque figure whose delusion is the main thing that defines her (and the main thing the movie wants to study. Holden even spends like half his voiceover reviewing it like a critic might.) Her seduction of Joe is the most psychologically interesting part of her character for me because it's pretty much the only one that scans as grounded and recognizable.

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"If you guys were the inventors of Facebook, you'd have invented Facebook."

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"On a fall night in 2003, Harvard undergrad and computer programming genius Mark Zuckerberg sits down at his computer and heatedly begins working on a new idea. In a fury of blogging and programming, what begins in his dorm room soon becomes a global social network and a revolution in communication. A mere six years and 500 million friends later, Mark Zuckerberg is the youngest billionaire in history... but for this entrepreneur, success leads to both personal and legal complications." - Columbia Pictures

 

Its Legacy

 

"IN 2010,Facebook was having a pretty good year. It was good because the site was still seeing massive user growth and it had seen its valuation balloon to $23 billion. Facebook was also facing backlash over violating users' privacy, but it was nothing like the public lashings the company faces now. Not all on the up-and-up, but not all bad either.  Then, on October 1, The Social Network came out. It was an at times blistering, two-hour version of Facebook's origin story, and all the double-crossing and lawsuits that followed. Critics and audiences loved it (the movie went on to win three Oscars), it pretty much launched Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross' careers as film composers, and it painted a less-than-flattering picture of cofounder Mark Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg). It was, as the haunting billboards at the time suggested, a portrayal of the dark side of the founding of your mom's new favorite social media site.

 

Was it true? Eh … maybe? At the time, Zuckerberg called it fictional (and later "hurtful") and the company's PR team ran some countermeasures in the lead-up to its release without ever really attacking the film itself. It was based on actual news and court cases, so it wasn't as if director David Fincher and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin created the thing from whole cloth. But there were, clearly, dramatic flourishes, the least of which is the fact that no one actually speaks the way Sorkin writes. Instead, The Social Network was, as so many of these films are, an amalgamation of truths, fiction woven together from fact.  Now, nearly a decade later and 15 years into the life of Facebook, I think I've realized something: The Social Network was right. Not necessarily historically accurate—only the people who were in the room know those truths—but about its messages: privacy matters (whether you're taking photos from a sorority web site or giving access to user data), connection comes with consequences, the tech boom gave an enormous amount of power to people who'd never touched it before.

 

The Social Network is something of a decoder ring for popular opinion about Facebook at any given time. Watch it in 2010 and it might feel much darker than anything associated with the company needed to be. Watch it today, it almost seems like the company got off light. In an essay for The Verge just two years ago, Kaitlyn Tiffany pointed to Zuckerberg's political ambitions and platitudes about connection (and lack of culpability for the ramifications of it) and concluded that "watching The Social Network in 2017 is also weird, disorienting, gag-inducing, and full of unintentional laughs … it feels like a relic, a naïve movie with quaint, softball critiques of Mark Zuckerberg and his creation."

 

Late last year, Jim Rutenberg, writing for The New York Times, straight-up declared, "The Facebook Movie Told Us What We Needed to Know About Mark Zuckerberg." Discussing Facebook's potential role in Russian election tampering in the US and chaos in Myanmar, Rutenberg said, "The film's portrayal of the budding tech magnate as someone more interested in growing his creation than in who might be hurt by it has stood the test of time. … Watching the origin story unfold from stadium seating eight years ago, I thought I was seeing a series of hard lessons learned as a callow 19-year-old came of age. Streaming it in 2018, I saw something else: the beginning of a pattern that has become all too familiar."  Put simply, the movie is a Rosetta Stone. If you want to translate how you or anyone else is feeling about Facebook, turn on The Social Network and chronicle the reactions."

- Angela Watercutter, Wired

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

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Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"The Social Network,” directed by David Fincher and written by Aaron Sorkin, rushes through a coruscating series of exhilarations and desolations, triumphs and betrayals, and ends with what feels like darkness closing in on an isolated soul. This brilliantly entertaining and emotionally wrenching movie is built around a melancholy paradox: in 2003, Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), a nineteen-year-old Harvard sophomore, invents Facebook and eventually creates a five-hundred-million-strong network of “friends,” but Zuckerberg is so egotistical, work-obsessed, and withdrawn that he can’t stay close to anyone; he blows off his only real pal, Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield), a fellow Jewish student at Harvard, who helps him launch the site. The movie is not a conventionally priggish tale of youthful innocence corrupted by riches; nor is it merely a sarcastic arrow shot into the heart of a poor little rich boy. Both themes are there, but the dramatic development of the material pushes beyond simplicities, and the portrait of Zuckerberg is many-sided and ambiguous; no two viewers will see him in quite the same way. The debate about the movie’s accuracy has already begun, but Fincher and Sorkin, selecting from known facts and then freely interpreting them, have created a work of art. Accuracy is now a secondary issue. In this extraordinary collaboration, the portrait of Zuckerberg, I would guess, was produced by a happy tension, even an opposition, between the two men—a tug-of-war between Fincher’s gleeful appreciation of an outsider who overturns the social order and Sorkin’s old-fashioned, humanist distaste for electronic friend-making and a world of virtual emotions. The result is a movie that is absolutely emblematic of its time and place. “The Social Network” is shrewdly perceptive about such things as class, manners, ethics, and the emptying out of self that accompanies a genius’s absorption in his work. It has the hard-charging excitement of a very recent revolution, the surge and sweep of big money moving fast and chewing people up in its wake.

 

The movie’s evenhandedness forces us to make our own judgments. For instance, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, despite their hilarious double perfection, are never caricatured as muscle-bound jocks. They understand the idea of a social-dating site. What they lack is Zuckerberg and Parker’s intuitive apprehension of it as a new form of virtual social life. Fincher and Sorkin treat the brothers as squarely honorable traditionalists. They go to see Larry Summers (Douglas Urbanski), then the president of Harvard, to complain about Zuckerberg, and one can feel, in this seemingly unimportant scene, history falling into place, a shift from one kind of capitalism to another. Fincher and Sorkin wickedly imply that Summers is Zuckerberg thirty years older and many pounds heavier. He has the same kind of brightest-guy-in-the-room arrogance, and little sympathy for entitled young men talking about ethics when they’ve been left behind by a faster innovator.

 

Zuckerberg’s tragedy, of course, is that he leaves behind his friends as well as his intellectual inferiors. It may not be fair to Zuckerberg, but Sorkin and Fincher have set him up as a symbolic man of the age, a supremely functional prince of dysfunction. Charles Foster Kane was convivial and outgoing; Zuckerberg engages only the world he is creating. But those viewers who think of him as nothing more than a vindictive little shit will be responding to only one part of him. He’s a revolutionary because he broods on his personal grievances and, as insensitive as he is, reaches the aggrieved element in everyone, the human desire for response. He’s meant to be a hero—certainly he’s Fincher’s hero, an artist working in code who sticks to his vision and is helpless to prevent himself from suffering the most wounding personal loss."

- David Denby, New Yorker

 

User Opinion

 

"Perfect.  One of the greatest films of the century." - @TMP

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

He's violating

 

Mark Zuckerberg invading

 

Profiting for Mitch

 

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Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 17, 2013 - 30, 2014 - 46, 2016 - 54, 2018 - Unranked

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Brad Bird - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, James Cameron - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1,Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, David Lean - 1, Sergio Leone - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, John Lasseter - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Hayao Miyazaki - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Christopher Nolan - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,   Martin Scorsese - 1, Steven Spielberg - 1, Quentin Tarantino - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 6, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, WDAS - 3, Before Trilogy - 2, Spider-Man - 2,  Toy Story - 2, Cameron - 1, Die Hard - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, Monty Python - 1, Nolan - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Scorsese -1, Star Wars - 1, Studio Ghibli - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1940s - 2, 1950s - 5, 1960s - 5, 1970s - 4, 1980s - 8, 1990s - 7, 2000s - 12, 2010s - 12

 

 

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