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The Panda

BOT's Top 100 Movies of All Time - Hindsight is 2020 Edition

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That's a fascinating anecdote that you posted about the taglines that were considered before, in space no one can hear you scream. That is one of the all-time best movie lines and in my personal opinion I would say maybe the only better one is for Jaws 2, just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water.

 

Alien is almost as good as James Cameron sequel. I love everything about the film I just like Cameron's cast and all out war kind of thing for the second phone.

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7 minutes ago, baumer said:

 

I disagree but I see where you're coming from. I personally have it as his third best film but even if it was is weakest film, every film he is made is so incredibly strong that to have Titanic be his weakest would still be better than probably 90% of the films that are out there, in my opinion.

 

But fwiw imo

 

Aliens

T2

Titanic

Terminator

True Lies

 

All 9.5/10 or above

 

Abyss

Avatar

Piranha 2

 

That would be my order. 

If we are doing it

 

Titanic

Terminator 2

Terminator

Avatar

Aliens

 

These are only 5 I have seen. All 8/10, the highest I go for rating the movies.

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Okay so I got a little pretentious in a little bit snooty in my review of pulp fiction when I said that you're not a true film fan if you can't see the brilliance in pulp fiction. But sue me that review was written about 25 years ago and I was a much different person back then. But my point still stands that it is one of the greatest films ever made.

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1 minute ago, baumer said:

Okay so I got a little pretentious in a little bit snooty in my review of pulp fiction when I said that you're not a true film fan if you can't see the brilliance in pulp fiction. But sue me that review was written about 25 years ago and I was a much different person back then. But my point still stands that it is one of the greatest films ever made.

Oh, I get it, and I mostly agree. Pulp Fiction is one of those essential "film fan" movies, that any greatest films of all time list, is usually incomplete without. I think it's brilliant of course. It was number #43 on my list for example. 

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I am going in super rage mode with Pulp coming in this low

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1 minute ago, Jake Gittes said:

I am going in super rage mode with Pulp coming in this low


I am going in super rage mode with Pulp coming in this high

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"They are nice because they are rich."

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"Jobless, penniless, and, above all, hopeless, the unmotivated patriarch, Ki-taek, and his equally unambitious family--his supportive wife, Chung-sook; his cynical twentysomething daughter, Ki-jung, and his college-age son, Ki-woo--occupy themselves by working for peanuts in their squalid basement-level apartment. Then, by sheer luck, a lucrative business proposition will pave the way for an ingeniously insidious scheme, as Ki-woo summons up the courage to pose as an English tutor for the teenage daughter of the affluent Park family. Now, the stage seems set for an unceasing winner-take-all class war. How does one get rid of a parasite?"

 

Its Legacy

 

"If we take just a moment to look at the competition at Cannes purely as a horse race, we can’t help but notice that, as of this writing, Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite has taken the lead on nearly all the grids tracking critics’ ratings. Wielding humor as his sharpest sword, Bong has taken jabs at South Korean law enforcement in Memories of Murder (2003) and Mother (2009) and slashed away at governments and corporations in treacherous cahoots in The Host (2006) and Okja (2017). With Parasite, “Bong is back and on brilliant form,” announces Jessica Kiang in Variety, “but he is unmistakably, roaringly furious, and it registers because the target is so deserving, so enormous, so 2019: Parasite is a tick fat with the bitter blood of class rage.”  A few critics reviewing Parasite have drawn comparisons to Bong’s Snowpiercer (2013), in which class divisions are neatly mapped out from car to car as the last train on Earth races along horizontal rails. In Parasite, the lines are vertical. At the bottom, huddled in a cramped subterranean apartment in a working class neighborhood where drunks stop by to barf or urinate on their windows, Ki-taek (Bong regular Song Kang-ho), his wife Chung-sook (Chang Hyae-jin), and their son Ki-woo and daughter Ki-jung (Choi Woo-shik and Park So-dam) will resort to any means necessary to make ends meet. Many have been reminded of the scrappy resourcefulness of the family in Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Shoplifters, the winner of last year’s Palme d’Or.

 

Movement up and down the economic ladder in Parasite is nowhere near as clear-cut or straightforward as the revolt staged in Snowpiercer. At Vulture, Bilge Ebiri observes that Parasite “creates its own audience as it proceeds, playing with our sense of identification, making us cheer on depraved behavior and then pulling the rug out from under our sick expectations,” and “much of Parasite’s great power comes from the way it coddles and undoes our allegiances, and then builds them back up again.” Bong “never forsakes his characters’ emotional through lines, so even their strangest, most catastrophic actions feel grounded in psychological reality.”

 

Notebook editor Daniel Kasman finds that Bong’s “frames are alive with activity and spatial detail, not just fleshing out the mise-en-scène of his world, but teasing and elucidating space to move us from action to action, idea to idea, frequently playing with what we know or don’t know such that the film, however grim in behavior, is constantly surprising and comic. In particular, the film has a field day with the modernist mansion in which much of the story hijinks occur, a playground of spaces to navigate in different ways: run, hide, fight, play, inside, outside, upstairs, down, the basement and the depths, much with a view of the pristine garden.” For IndieWire’s David Ehrlich, “the best thing about Parasite is that it gives us permission to stop trying to sort his movies into any sort of pre-existing taxonomy—with Parasite, Bong finally becomes a genre unto himself.”"

- David Hudson, The Criterion Collection

 

From the Filmmaker

 

"Thank you.  I will drink til next morning." - Bong Joon-Ho

 

 

Screen-Shot-2020-03-11-at-4.29.35-PM.jpg

 

Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"The world can seem a very different place depending on the window you’re looking out of. Out of their stinkbug and mildew-infested basement apartment, the Kim family sees steel bars. Beyond that, one of Seoul’s backstreets – the kind that drunks dive into to relieve themselves. When the street fumigators go by, they leave their windows open so their apartment can be treated for free, even if they nearly choke to death in the process. Then there’s the Park family, settled in a quiet suburban home that’s halfway between an art installation and a fortress. Half the walls are made of glass, offering a clear view of the acid-green lawn outside and the vegetation that encloses it on all sides. It’s a vista of immense serenity, safety, and eerie perfection. The Park patriarch Dong-ik (Lee Sun-kyun) is a tech CEO who’s barely home, while his wife Yeon-gyo (Cho Yeo-jeong) is fluttery and fragile. She obsesses over the imagined artistic genius of her son. He specialises in angry, rebellious scribbles. Toy dogs keep appearing out of nowhere. Are they multiplying in secret?

 

But Bong has never made a straightforward film in his life – that’s why he’s one of the great masters of the cinematic game (his awards recognition is long overdue, with Parasite landing six Oscar nominations). The director’s work is as playful as it is sincere and revelatory. He’ll make you feel at home, and then rip the rug out from under you. As his takes on the monster movie (2006’s The Host) and dystopian fantasy (2013’s Snowpiercer) already proved, the director has an affinity for genre cinema, but has never felt confined by its rules. Parasite doesn’t quite take place in our world, but neither is it fantasy. It happens in a world that would exist if people’s desires and motivations weren’t stuffed below the surface.  The director’s always shown an interest in class conflict. The train in Snowpiercer is just one big metaphor for capitalism, after all. But Parasite might be his most intricate examination of the topic so far. The “parasite” of the title applies to every character in this film; the rich leech off the poor, who in turn survive by attaching themselves to the underbelly of the ruling class.

 

Everyone’s fixated on transforming into something else: the Kim family give themselves new backstories that involve fancy foreign colleges and elite skill sets. Yeon-gyo is obsessed with American culture (the most capitalist of them all), importing Native American-style toys for her son and declaring he’s the next Basquiat. In Parasite, capitalism is an illusion piled onto another illusion, with everyone trampling each other to reach some undefined goal.  Much of this story, however, isn’t told in words, but in the use of space and the way people move through it. The Kim family are often bundled into the same frame, perched awkwardly on furniture and fittings so they can all fit. They’re a united front in this battle. The Park family, meanwhile, always sit in separate rooms or sides of the frame. No wonder they’re so weak and easily manipulated.  But, be warned: there are no victories in Parasite. And no one gets away scot-free."

- Clarisse Loughrey, The Independent

 

User Opinion

 

"When I went into the theaters to see Parasite last October, the cinematic landscape felt fairly barren.  Blockbusters for the year were mindless barrages of VFX trying to get a rise of your senses, Disney kept releasing the same product and slapping a ‘new’ label on it and there was very little mainstream cinema that felt like it could truly excite.  Needless to say, Parasite restored my excitement in potential for originality and the capability of a filmmaker to push boundaries while also provide something entirely crowdpleasing.

 

For a Korean film to catch the lightning in a bottle that Parasite did is nothing but spectacular, and that’s because of the striking vision of the man behind it all.  Bong Joon-Ho is one of the great modern voices of the cinematic landscape, and prior to Parasite had never failed to deliver something original and fresh.  Yet with Parasite he really managed to top all of his impressive filmography to come before.

 

Parasite took a topical issue in class differences specific to South Korea, yet managed to also be something universal for audiences across cultures.  I loved the phrase that called the film “a magic trick”, because it’s exactly that.  It sets the audiences up with specific expectations of what they’re about to watch, and then proceeds to lead them down an unexpected and wild ride.  It manages to evoke empathy for its large cast of characters, both poor and rich alike, and give each of them a dynamic range exploring how the conditions of your economic environment effect the human psyche.  It’s a film that manages to challeng, make you feel and entertain like nothing else I saw this year.

 

Parasite is masterclass innovative filmmaking that will be studied and enjoyed for years to come." - @The Panda

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

Amidst class warfare

 

A struggle from underbellies

 

Bong delivers greatness

 

2020_06_film.jpg?itok=8Muw3qvx&c=0a6656d

 

Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - N/a, 2013 - N/a, 2014 - N/a, 2016 - N/a, 2018 - N/a

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,  Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Steven Spielberg - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Francis Ford Coppola - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lean - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 8, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 2, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 6, 1970s - 7, 1980s - 9, 1990s - 13, 2000s - 15, 2010s - 14

 

 

 

Edited by The Panda
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2 minutes ago, Plain Old Tele said:


I am going in super rage mode with Pulp coming in this high

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5 minutes ago, Plain Old Tele said:


I am going in super rage mode with Pulp coming in this high

Can I just go in the middle of you and Baumer dad and say its about right? 

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Pulp Fiction is only like the most iconic, influential and best movie of the '90s. Now, that's a hard motherfucking fact of life. But that's a fact of life your ass is gonna have to get realistic about, @Plain Old Tele
 

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Just now, The Stingray said:

Pulp Fiction is only like the most iconic, influential and best movie of the '90s. Now, that's a hard motherfucking fact of life. But that's a fact of life your ass is gonna have to get realistic about, @Plain Old Tele
 


It’s certainly very influential. I wouldn’t even argue about a possible placement in a top 100 list. 

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8 minutes ago, The Stingray said:

Pulp Fiction is only like the most iconic, influential and best movie of the '90s. Now, that's a hard motherfucking fact of life. But that's a fact of life your ass is gonna have to get realistic about, @Plain Old Tele
 

 

Well done LOL I read that in Wallace's voice.

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"Well, Clarice - have the lambs stopped screaming?"

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"Perplexed by a string of grisly murders elaborately executed by the elusive mass-killer nicknamed "Buffalo Bill", the vulnerable and untried F.B.I. trainee, Clarice Starling, is assigned by the Special Agent, Jack Crawford, to assist in the manhunt. Hoping to attain a clearer perception of the psychopathic serial killer's modus operandi, the young investigator reluctantly accepts the help of another hideous monster: the brilliant psychiatrist and cannibalistic mass-murderer, Dr Hannibal Lecter. Now, with every visit to the manipulative doctor's heavily reinforced prison cell, Clarice delves just a little bit deeper into the dark mind of a homicidal maniac; however, how far is she willing to go to unearth pure evil?"

 

Its Legacy

 

"An analysis of a film as rich as The Silence of the
Lambs could go on for an interminable length of time; in
fact, Roger Ebert has written about his experiences during
a weekend seminar on the film: frame by frame, the film is
studied, discussed, and made meaningful. It does seem
surprising initially, though, to have a thriller win such
accolades. One expects certain films to have more meaning
than others: Ordinary People, for example, is more easily
called life-changing. But perhaps therein lies the genius
in Demme's film: "mercilessly scary and mercifully
humane," it has taken exceptionally unpleasant subject
matter and a generally disreputable genre, using an
intricate understanding of rites of passage, storytelling,
meaning, and culture, to create a film of terror but not
gratuitous violence; a film in which the canonical is
challenged, forcing us to look twice before judging
another human being (artist, "criminal," or "psychopath")
as "mad"; a film in which the human drama supersedes and
propels the plot instead of falling victim to it.
But did anyone really get it? 

 

The Silence of the Lambs won five academy awards in
1991, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best
Adapted Screenplay. But did those who cast their ballots 

for the film see it as just a marvelously constructed and
performed story? Or did they go beyond the story, into
the depths of questioning which we have just accomplished?
Obviously, we will never know, but a part of me believes
that, as Bruner insists that we use stories and narratives
to make meaning within our lives, part of the depth of
this intricate and precise story perhaps did make it into
the thought-processes of more in its audience than might
be expected. A brilliant work of art is a brilliant work
of art, and the film's critical and financial success
leads me to hope that Demme's fleshing out (if you will)
of a genre known for producing mere "entertainment" did
reach more people in a meaningful way than, say, an
excellent but neglected exhibit at a small-town museum.

 

I want to clarify here that I am not suggesting
that Demme and the film are asking us to release all
serial killers from confinement and gather the family
around the television to watch the life-affirming Silence
of the Lambs. Rather, I maintain that Demme works with
the images and realities of and within America to tell his
story -- while dealing with rites of passage and
addressing a number of subtle dilemmas within our culture.
We in America are so intent upon denying darkness that we
can create individuals who eventually must act out in
horrifying ways. Perhaps, the film argues, if we had in
place these Native American rituals which embrace the
darkness in order to understand it, we might not

experience as much violent crime...and possibly not need a
Hannibal Lecter to guide us on our ovm journeys.

 

In "Literature as Equipment for Living," Kenneth
Burke writes that proverbs fall into many different
categories which suggest the "active nature" inherent
within them. Proverbs console; chart; foretell; show us
how to live wisely; instruct. Somehow, we feel that
they understand. And, as Burke extends this analysis from
proverbs to encompass the whole field of literature,
perhaps we should look more often for this "active nature"
in places previously unexplored: where we might not expect
to find anything more than a good laugh, a simple
distraction, or a scare. For when a carefully constructed
work of art -- our "equipment for living" -- comes along,
we must look at it more closely than we might be
immediately inclined. A close look could produce insights
about us and our culture; perhaps, then, there is a
greater potential to change our culture and our lives
through theatre, film, poetry, fiction, and art than we
ever imagined. If we accept that the work of art can
intimately possess an understanding of the ways in which
we live our lives, perhaps then we can truly begin to seek
out and perceive clues within it as to how to make meaning
out of and survive our own dramas...and set into motion
true cultural change.


And isn't that what art within a culture should
accomplish? "

- Cultural analysis of Jonathan Demme's "The Silence of the
Lambs" 

Arthur S. Almquist, The University of Montana 1996

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

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Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"Do not be deceived by the fact that "The Silence of the Lambs" is opening on Valentine's Day. It is definitely not a romantic comedy. Still, director Jonathan Demme's brilliantly executed adaptation of Thomas Harris' gristly novel is a kind of love story - or at least that is how Demme sees it. For at the heart of this unnerving suspense movie is a terrifyingly intimate relationship between a sociopathic genius (who makes the most notorious Nazi butchers seem like saints), and a dedicated career woman (who, for all her drive and ambition, is as pure as a nun).

 

Demme has remained remarkably true to Harris' novel, although the ending has been altered to extent that it suggests the possibility of a sequel. The movie, scary and graphic to cause timid souls (such as this writer) to close their eyes at certain points, has a vise-like grip on the audience. From the first, one is propelled along the emotional force of tautly directed high-tension scenes. The tension falls off a bit on the confrontation with the creepy killer, who's a dime-store criminal compared with Lecter.

 

Delivering verbal assaults on Clarice's psyche in a wickedly sarcastic tone, Hopkins transforms Lecter into one of the most memorable villains in movie history. His hand brushed Clarice's in a gesture of such palpable intimacy that the audience feels as naked and exposed as his young protégée. Even the touches of comic relief cannot shatter the spell cast by this magnetic monster who wants to know Clarice to the very depths of her soul."

- Kathleen Carrol, NY Daily News

 

User Opinion

 

"Off the charts A+++. Off course Sir Anthony was brilliant as Hannibal. Excellent performance. And who could forget Buffalo Bill dancing around naked, lol? The writing was brilliant.But the best part of this for me was Jodie Foster aka Agent Starling. As a woman, I love it when women are representing on screen as women and not some super woman. She played the role of a "green" agent to a tee. When she was alone in the house tracking Buffalo Bill I thought I was gonna come out of my skin. She was fukkin' scared but remained calm and kept moving forward. That was some awesome work by Foster. She gets it right. There are only two other female's work in cinema that are on that level of intensity to me. Linda Hamilton in Terminator and Sigourney Weaver in Alien. The way they played their roles put you right there with them as they were going toward the unknown. It's so funny because Meg Ryan was the front runner for Agent Starling and she turned it down. The director did not want Foster and the studio did not want Hopkins so they reached a compromise. Biography Chanenl did a really nice story on the making of the Silence of the Lambs. They just don't make movies like this anymore." - @ecstasy

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

A look in the soul

 

Of the one who slays the lamb

 

Darkness hides within

 

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Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 80, 2013 - 69, 2014 - 76, 2016 - 58, 2018 - 26

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,  Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Steven Spielberg - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Francis Ford Coppola - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lean - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 8, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 2, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 6, 1970s - 7, 1980s - 9, 1990s - 14, 2000s - 15, 2010s - 14

 

 

 

Edited by The Panda
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This does feel like an extremely film dude bro list. Which shouldn’t be surprising, given the demographics of BOT

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7 minutes ago, baumer said:

 

Well done LOL I read that in Wallace's voice.

 

With Al Green's Let's Stay Together playing in the background.
 

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Just now, Plain Old Tele said:

This does feel like an extremely film dude bro list. Which shouldn’t be surprising, given the demographics of BOT

yes fucking aliens 

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Okay if so many movies are dropping from 2018 rank 😕😕😕

 

🤔🤔🤔 There is possibility that Joker and The Dark Knight are in Top 5. 

 

I hope Joker never shows up. 

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51 minutes ago, baumer said:

That's a fascinating anecdote that you posted about the taglines that were considered before, in space no one can hear you scream. That is one of the all-time best movie lines and in my personal opinion I would say maybe the only better one is for Jaws 2, just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water.

 

Alien is almost as good as James Cameron sequel. I love everything about the film I just like Cameron's cast and all out war kind of thing for the second phone.

 

Also another incredible tagline from the original A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET

 

"Whatever you do...

don't fall asleep"

 

Just chilling, I fucking love it. It's not the true original tagline from the movie (that would be "If Nancy Doesn't Wake Up Screaming, She Won't Wake Up At All!") but it's the one that stuck with me the most from the trailers.

 

Also, very eager to see which movies replaced Pulp Fiction, Inception, etc from much higher placements

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Breaking my heart with number 120 missing 😭

 

Also, BOT really needs to watch older films.  Rashomon is an all-time classic, shame for it missing :rant:

 

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"Not only is Silence the best movie of the decade, and the most overlooked one (which is shocking given it's Scorsese's career long passion project), not only do I find it to be the best film of Scorsese's career, it has just about moved its way into one of my top 5 films of all time.  One of the most powerful movies I have ever watched.  Silence is certainly not an easy watch, and one that you'll certainly leave gaps of time before you come back and re-watch it, but that does not diminish the immense power of the movie.  It is not an easy, glowing endorsement of the faithful, nor is it a glorification of martyrdom, and it's also not a skeptical critique on religion.  Silence is a layered and nuanced look at faith, to what extent a person will go to hold onto it (to what extent the faithful should hold onto it), a question about suffering and how it can be allowed, and ultimately a work that is affirming to the spirit and rewarding to the faithful.  There's movies you never forget, there's movies that stick with you, there's movies that challenge you, but Silence is one of the few that goes beyond all of that.  If you're willing and of the right state of mind, it just might etch its way in your soul.  It's a movie with ideas and imagery that I'm still meditating over three years later, but ideas and imagery that were always there within my personal spiritual theology, it just provided the clarity to allow me to look and see them." - @The Panda

 

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"Rated solely on watching it on VHS once when I was 7. So many vividly exciting and frightening moments. Pleasure Island is genuinely terrifying." - @cannastop

 

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"Amazing, and one of (if not the) first examples of unreliable narrators in cinemas. It's really a profound statement about how all of us interpret our own reality and truth, based on our own ego, fears, hopes, and passions.

 

But aside from all of that, it's just a really entertaining film as well. Mifune is a standout." - @Plain Old Tele

 

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"The greatest film ever made. There, said it. Fuck ya'll" - @Jack Nevada

 

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"This is also one of my favorite movies. I really never saw that ending coming until pretty much when it was revealed. That pretty much never happens to me so I was completely shocked. I liked everyone in it.  Like Angel said previously, watching this a second time does make you appreciate some of the scenes more. Now when Kevin Spacey is just sitting in the room alone looking around, you know he is making up his story right there instead of just randomly staring." - @75Live

 

 

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