google-site-verification=EzRt-ZmNlc4J5RNLXiuJpAEGjNviG678nNB1w49cgZg Jump to content
The Panda

BOT's Top 100 Movies of All Time - Hindsight is 2020 Edition

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, Plain Old Tele said:


KANE might be high but I doubt it would win. :lol:

Agree, it does not show up before number 30 on the most popular on imdb:

https://www.imdb.com/search/title/?title_type=feature&release_date=1900-01-01,1969-12-31

 

2001, Casablanca, Gone with the wind, Lawrence of Arabia, Sunset bldv, Bonnie and Clyde, it's a wonderful life and I imagine some other that does not come in mind feel more or as likely.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Eric Skywalker said:

The list will just be 60% Disney,

Nope. Cause it would be no animation. It would only be 30%. 🥳😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Daxtreme said:

I saw Rashomon... didn't like it very much

 

Yojimbo was much better in my opinion

Maybe I'm too rationalist or literal-minded or whatever but I don't get the supposed profundity of Rashomon. It's dudes sitting around moping endlessly over the revelation that (shocker!) people are liars (no it's not about "subjective interpretations" or whatever, the stories told are so radically different it's literally impossible for them to be differing biased views of the same agreed-upon core event) before being rescued from their despair by baby ex machina. Also, it rains, so we all know it's serious.

  • Like 4
  • Not Cool 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Plain Old Tele said:


Because the point is to have the cutoff be the end of the Hayes Code, which signified the beginning of “modern Hollywood”.

But if Hayes Code is so important there remains the question of what to do with 1) pre-1934 films and 2) non-American films, for which the Code wasn't relevant.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did nobody know Federico Fellini when they mention great cinema of prep1970? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, titanic2187 said:

Did nobody know Federico Fellini when they mention great cinema of prep1970? 

Nope, if they didn't off-handedly mention him clearly nobody here has ever heard of him.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Jake Gittes said:

But if Hayes Code is so important there remains the question of what to do with 1) pre-1934 films and 2) non-American films, for which the Code wasn't relevant.

1) this assumes people have seen 1920s cinema. (That is also a self drag 🤣)

2) As long as they had an American Release, they should come in it. They are important in the transition from The Old Studio System to New Hollywood Cinema. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyway, people should watch more old movies. Back to the Panda show!

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you want to make an old movie countdown it can just be an old movie countdown with an arbitrary cut off. framing it with the hayes code thing just means a thread with a bunch of annoying questions about the guidelines such as the one above.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Cap said:

Nope. Cause it would be no animation. It would only be 30%. 🥳😉

boo

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A pre-67 would be pretty similar to the black and white list I ran a year ago:

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cap said:

Anyway, people should watch more old movies. Back to the Panda show!

 

Not as easy as it sounds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember having a visceral emotional reaction to this movie like nothing else when I was a teenager.

 

2y26nCC.png

 

87192Fb.png

 

"Get busy living, or get busy dying."

 

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"Chronicles the experiences of a formerly successful banker as a prisoner in the gloomy jailhouse of Shawshank after being found guilty of a crime he did not commit. The film portrays the man's unique way of dealing with his new, torturous life; along the way he befriends a number of fellow prisoners, most notably a wise long-term inmate named Red."

 

Its Legacy

 

"Twenty years ago this week, The Shawshank Redemption hit multiplexes. It’s a period prison drama with stately, old-fashioned rhythms, starring Tim Robbins as Andy Dufresne, wrongfully convicted of killing his wife, her lover and serving two life terms, and Morgan Freeman as fellow lifer “Red” Redding, who narrates the film. But the 90s were an era of booyah action movies starring the likes of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis. In Shawshank, the story of a decades-long quest for redemption and freedom, the closest things to action sequences involve fighting off buggery or defiantly blasting a Mozart duettino. Reviews were mostly favorable, but the film bombed, failing to earn even $1 million on its opening weekend and eventually eking out $16 million (about $25 million today) at the American box office during its initial release, not nearly enough—and even less so after marketing costs and exhibitors’ cuts—to recoup its $25 million budget.  That was then. Today The Shawshank Redemption tops the IMDb’s Top 250 cinema-favorites list with more than a million votes, having passed the previous champ, The Godfather, in 2008.* (While The Godfather—trailing by 300,000 votes—has maintained its runner-up position, Citizen Kane, the perennial greatest movie ever in critics’ polls, whispers “Rosebud” from No. 66.) Readers of the British movie magazine Empire voted The Shawshank Redemption No. 4 in a 2008 list of “the 500 Greatest Films of All Time,” and in 2011 the film won a BBC Radio favorite-film poll.

 

Morgan Freeman relies on less empirical evidence. “About everywhere you go, people say, ‘The Shawshank Redemption—greatest movie I ever saw,’ ” he told me. “Just comes out of them.” Not that he’s a disinterested observer, but Tim Robbins backs his co-star: “I swear to God, all over the world—all over the world—wherever I go, there are people who say, ‘That movie changed my life.’ ” Even the world’s most famous former prisoner connected with the movie, according to Robbins: “When I met [Nelson Mandela], he talked about loving Shawshank.”  How did a period prison film running 142 minutes—a life sentence for most audiences—become a global phenomenon capable of rankling a world superpower and stirring a Nobel Peace Prize winner? To borrow a quote from Shawshank, “Geology is the study of pressure and time. That’s all it takes, really. Pressure and time.”

 

It’s a Wonderful Life and The Wizard of Oz—the most viewed film of all time, according to the Library of Congress—followed similarly erratic paths into America’s psyche. Both were box-office disappointments that were defibrillated by TV reruns. And like The Wizard of Oz’s “There’s no place like home,” Shawshank quotes are now part of the beloved-dialogue lexicon. “It’s always, ‘Get busy living or get busy dying,’ ” says Freeman. “That must be the one that resonates the most. You know, are you going to do something about your life or not?” That mantra alone has inspired everything from T-shirts and tattoos to pop songs and sermons."

- Margaret Heidenry, Vanity Fair

 

From the Filmmaker

 

"I think one of the reasons Shawshank continues to resonate is that it's one of the few movies about a loving relationship --- really a love story about two men --- that doesn't involve car chases or is a buddy comedy. It's about two people coming to know each other very well under very difficult circumstances. I also think its staying power has to do with the overall theme of the movie, which is that there is redemption in holding on to your dream and that regardless of the obstacles in your path, there is a Zihuatanejo for everyone somewhere." - Tim Robbins

 

featured-image.jpg

 

Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"The story’s premise is simple enough: Dufresne is convicted of murdering his wife and her lover in 1947 and sentenced to consecutive life sentences in the hellish Shawshank facility. There, he makes the acquaintance of Red. (Andy: “I understand you’re a man who knows how to get things.” Red: “I’m known to locate certain things from time to time.” This is the prison-movie version of a “meet cute.”)  What follows is cinematic alchemy of a kind that’s all too rare, propelled by a supremely talented cast, a sumptuous score by Thomas Newman and a first-rate script and direction from first-timer Frank Darabont, who had the not-insurmountable task of taking King’s skinny novella “Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption” (Darabont purchased the rights for the King-ly sum of $1) and expanding it to a nearly 2½-hour canvas.

 

There’s also a clever bit of fast-footed storytelling legerdemain at play throughout “The Shawshank Redemption,” as we find ourselves so drawn in by the unfolding character drama and the byplay between the various prisoners that we forget we’re watching a prison movie that must — almost by definition — culminate in some kind of escape scheme. It’s a testament to Darabont’s construction that those moments lose none of their impact even after countless viewings.  Upon its initial release, “The Shawshank Redemption” failed to recoup even its $25 million budget, topping out domestically at a relatively piddly $16 million. But just as Andy drives home to Red, good things never die. And 25 years later, the film’s ill-fated theatrical release is a distant flicker of memory, while its insights into the human experience continue to find audiences ready to embrace it as one of the greatest movies of all time.  As redemptions go, it’s a pretty good one."

- Zaki Hasan, San Francisco Chronicle

 

User Opinion

 

"I just rewatched this for the first time since I was in middle school, and while it is not my personal favorite film of all-time, I think this is as close to a perfect film as there will ever be. Every single thing works. What an uplifting masterpiece." - @Cmasterclay

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

Hammering away

 

Rita Hayworth watching me

 

I will leave this box

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 24, 2013 - 22, 2014 - 14, 2016 - 18, 2018 - 25

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,  Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Steven Spielberg - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Francis Ford Coppola - 1, Frank Darabont - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lean - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 8, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 2, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 6, 1970s - 7, 1980s - 9, 1990s - 15, 2000s - 15, 2010s - 14

 

 

 

Edited by The Panda
  • Like 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hoXx4DZ.png

 

nfvkL3n.png

 

"This is reality, Greg."

 

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"After a gentle alien becomes stranded on Earth, the being is discovered and befriended by a young boy named Elliott. Bringing the extraterrestrial into his suburban California house, Elliott introduces E.T., as the alien is dubbed, to his brother and his little sister, Gertie, and the children decide to keep its existence a secret. Soon, however, E.T. falls ill, resulting in government intervention and a dire situation for both Elliott and the alien."

 

Its Legacy

 

 

"E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial was one of Spielberg’s greatest achievements; according to Box Office Mojo, when adjusted for inflation, the film has made the fourth highest gross of all time (boxofficemojo.com). E.T. was his most successful in terms of revenue. Spielberg’s combination of alien supernatural occurances and suburban reality created an incredibly loved film. The use of a mysterious film elements created such an interesting atmosphere of uncertainty and possibility, which when in contact with Elliott, was able to provide answers for the concerns he was dealing with. The authentic human characters and normal day to day situations made the film seem relatable, in many ways, to a large audience. As Andrew Gordon, in his article “E.T. as Fairy Tale” puts it, “For children, E.T. is a voyage of emotional discovery, for adults, a rediscovery of feeling we thought we had lost or outgrown”(Gordon, 303). With the target audience being kids, each of the three siblings could appeal to a different age a children viewing the movie. With the film appealing to such a wide audience, it became the highest grossing movie of it’s time, beating the current records of another film that Spielberg made, Jaws; both films were made early in the modern blockbuster process that Spielberg played a huge role in. E.T. had an incredible heart warming impact with a happy ending, and would pave the way for future science fiction films to come that would involve children and their experiences with the extraterrestrial.

 

The link between reality and the supernatural in this film as a means of displaying childhood conflicts and their solutions played a large role in the success of the movie. Gordon argues that E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial depicts a fairy tale environment that is suitable for all children, while the characters experience meaningful conflicts throughout the film. His argument goes along with mine, in that this film depicts childhood conflict, and because of this, it adds to the films greatness and the film is successful. Spielberg was able to create a masterpiece by combining realistic problems with a non-realistic environment; attracting people who either wanted to see a cool sci-fi film or a family friendly film, or both.

 

While E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial wasn’t the first film to put aliens in a realistic environment, it was definitely one of the most iconic films to do so, and it used the lurking factor of childhood conflict within its reality. This film paved the way for other films and shows that have used children in a realistic setting being affected by supernatural sources, and the film continues to be used today. Two great examples of film being that E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial had an influence on are Super 8 and Stranger Things. The film, Super 8, has direct ties with E.T. because Steven Spielberg was a producer for the film. The film stars children in a realistic environment dealing with alien activity, just like E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. The Netflix original series Stranger Things, a currently running, popular show, also depicts kids in the same kind of setting, once again, dealing with aliens. The show goes so far as to copy E.T. with scenes of the characters on their bikes, levitation special effects, and much more. These shows and movies that copy aspects of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, do so because the films was an incredible depiction of the conflicts mixed with extra-terrestrial elements that are discussed in this exhibit. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial has influenced films since its creation, and will continue to do so, because of its incredibly accurate depiction childhood conflict in a sci-fi genre."

- Utah State University, Digital Exhibits

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

Allen-Daviau-obit.jpg

 

Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"Full disclosure, right off the top: I am a total geek for "E.T." I was 9 years old when "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial" came out in 1982, and it was one of the first truly transforming movie events of my life. Every time I saw it, I cried when E.T. died -- even though I knew he'd come back to life. And I had the biggest crush on Henry Thomas -- he was right up there with Rick Springfield and Scott Baio in my preadolescent opinion. Something about the friendship between a lonely young boy and an alien who's far from home tugged at my heart. It was full of awe and wonder, so sweet and sad and sometimes scary. And it still is. Twenty years and $700 million in worldwide box office revenue later, "E.T." is back in theaters, with new footage and enhanced visual effects. It holds up beautifully.

 

I hadn't seen "E.T." in about 15 years and rented it recently, wondering whether it would have the same emotional impact on me as an adult. Sitting on the couch, blubbering, I realized that it did -- and I have to admit, I got a little teary-eyed seeing the updated version, as well. That kind of enduring moviemaking comes along once every 20 years." - Christy Lemire, The Associated Press

 

User Opinion

 

"E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is pure magic. Spielberg's direction has rarely been as touching and marvelous as it is in this film. Elliot and ET's friendship is believable and heartwarming, with Henry Thomas delivering one of the greatest child actor performances ever. ET himself is technically astounding, not once appearing false to the audience or to his friends. The way Spielberg uses divorce as a backdrop to further the emotional connection is brilliant, and particularly, his use of lighting in every scene is incredible, always managing to draw out the appropriate mystique and emotion at every possible moment. Humorous and heartfelt, the film's legacy as one of Spielberg's best will also live on for decades and decades to come. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is a classic of the family film genre, still amazing audiences to this day." - @Blankments

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

Flying on a bike

 

Through the moon and the sun

 

Whoops, E.T. pushed me!

 

ET-extra-terrestrial-7-copy.jpg?mtime=20

 

Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 42, 2013 - 25, 2014 - 69, 2016 - 34, 2018 - 35

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Steven Spielberg - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,  Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Francis Ford Coppola - 1, Frank Darabont - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lean - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 8, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 2, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 6, 1970s - 7, 1980s - 10, 1990s - 15, 2000s - 15, 2010s - 14

 

 

 

Edited by The Panda
  • Like 13
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

z458ztc.png

 

g53wmhH.png

 

"Take her to the moon for me."

 

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"Growing up can be a bumpy road, and it's no exception for Riley, who is uprooted from her Midwest life when her father starts a new job in San Francisco. Like all of us, Riley is guided by her emotions - Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness. The emotions live in Headquarters, the control center inside Riley's mind, where they help advise her through everyday life. As Riley and her emotions struggle to adjust to a new life in San Francisco, turmoil ensues in Headquarters. Although Joy, Riley's main and most important emotion, tries to keep things positive, the emotions conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house and school."

 

Its Legacy

 

"Since its release last month, Inside Out has been applauded by critics, adored by audiences, and has become the likely front-runner for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.  But perhaps its greatest achievement has been this: It has moved viewers young and old to take a look inside their own minds. As you likely know by now, much of the film takes place in the head of an 11-year-old girl named Riley, with five emotions—Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear, and Disgust—embodied by characters who help Riley navigate her world. The film has some deep things to say about the nature of our emotions—which is no coincidence, as the GGSC’s founding faculty director, Dacher Keltner, served as a consultant on the film, helping to make sure that, despite some obvious creative liberties, the film’s fundamental messages about emotion are consistent with scientific research.  Those messages are smartly embedded within Inside Out‘s inventive storytelling and mind-blowing animation; they enrich the film without weighing it down. But they are conveyed strongly enough to provide a foundation for discussion among kids and adults alike. Some of the most memorable scenes in the film double as teachable moments for the classroom or dinner table.

 

Thank goodness emotion researcher June Gruber and her colleagues started looking at the nuances of happiness and its pursuit. Their findings challenge the “happy-all-the-time” imperative that was probably imposed upon many of us.  For example, their research suggests that making happiness an explicit goal in life can actually make us miserable. Gruber’s colleague Iris Mauss has discovered that the more people strive for happiness, the greater the chance that they’ll set very high standards of happiness for themselves and feel disappointed—and less happy—when they’re not able to meet those standards all the time.  So it should come as no surprise that trying to force herself to be happy actually doesn’t help Riley deal with the stresses and transitions in her life. In fact, not only does that strategy fail to bring her happiness, it also seems to make her feel isolated and angry with her parents, which factors into her decision to run away from home.

 

4) Mindfully embrace—rather than suppress—tough emotions. At one point, Joy attempts to prevent Sadness from having any influence on Riley’s psyche by drawing a small “circle of Sadness” in chalk and instructing Sadness to stay within it. It’s a funny moment, but psychologists will recognize that Joy is engaging in a risky behavior called “emotional suppression”—an emotion-regulation strategy that has been found to lead to anxiety and depression, especially amongst teenagers whose grasp of their own emotions is still developing. Sure enough, trying to contain Sadness and deny her a role in the action ultimately backfires for Joy, and for Riley.  Later in the film, when Bing Bong loses his wagon (the scene described above), Joy tries to get him to “cognitively reappraise” the situation, meaning that she encourages him to reinterpret what this loss means for him—in this case, by trying to shift his emotional response toward the positive. Cognitive reappraisal is a strategy that has historically been considered the most effective way to regulate emotions. But even this method of emotion regulation is not always the best approach, as researchers have found that it can sometimes increase rather than decrease depression, depending on the situation.  Toward the end of the movie, Joy does what some researchers now consider to be the healthiest method for working with emotions: Instead of avoiding or denying Sadness, Joy accepts Sadness for who she is, realizing that she is an important part of Riley’s emotional life."

- Jason Marsh and Vicki Zakrzewski, PhD

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

214d7c2c6f404ad981bbce7bb33db044.jpg

 

Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"You’ve got to be a little cynical to love the movies. There’s a part of you — or me, anyway — that wants to be surprised but expects to be disappointed. You want something that at least feels new, even if we’re just talking about reupholstered oldness. But two new movies — Pete Docter and Pixar’s Inside Out and a film about young, hearing-impaired mafiosi called The Tribe — sit at opposite artistic poles yet meet in an amazing middle: They’re both interior stories. They both remind you, in their respective ways, that the movies can still show you something not only that you’ve never seen but that you never expected to see.

 

On its surface, there’s not much to the Pixar film. An 11-year-old Minnesotan named Riley Anderson (voiced by Kaitlyn Dias) is dragged along with her mother (Diane Lane) to San Francisco because her dad (Kyle MacLachlan) has a shaky-sounding new tech job. It means no more hockey, a new school, and a flood of mixed emotions. But Inside Out keeps leaving that surface of her everyday life, cutting away to the heart of the movie: a vast warehouse of orb-concealed core memories in Riley’s brain staffed by five elemental emotions that have been personified and color-coded.

 

Each emotion thinks it serves a purpose for Riley. Joy presumes that hers is the most meaningful, especially after the move to a skinny, drab San Francisco Victorian. (This is the second movie in the space of a month, after San Andreas, that refuses to see even a visual upside to this city. And Pixar lives in Emeryville!) Indeed, most of the memory orbs glow yellow. They do so in a way that suggests Joy is winning the life of Riley at the expense of the other emotions. There’s reason to fear that Docter and the multitudes working with him will prize Joy as a leader more than her coworkers. She certainly thinks as much of herself. And for the first 20 minutes or so, the writing has a good time letting the emotions coexist and banter with each other. But the adventure begins when Sadness’s sense of her own superfluousness leads her to touch some of the orbs, turning them blue and raising the volume on Joy’s control-freak politeness.  This is a rightly complicated world. The movie divides Riley’s personality into a quintet of memory-driven islands — Family Island, Hockey Island, Goofball Island, etc. — that bridge out from the control room and have the pinwheeling, pop-up-book look of advertisements for amusement parks.1 Sadness touches a particular orb and turns one of Riley’s happy memories sad, which makes her cry in class. Joy and Sadness tussle, causing core memories to come loose. The memories, along with Joy and Sadness, are sucked up into a tube and deposited in the outer reaches of Riley’s brain, resulting in the comedy of Disgust, Anger, and Fear trying to maintain order back at headquarters.

 

Inside Out remains unbusy just long enough to achieve poignant philosophical rumination. Some of that achievement is a matter of rareness: a movie situated entirely within the brain of a girl, whose two primary emotions are gendered as female. But a lot of it has to do with the gathering of wisdom. Docter also directed Up, a handsomer, deeply emotional movie with more breathtaking action set pieces. The new movie compounds the feat of the previous one, not by personifying a single emotion but by recognizing the strength of combining them while punching up the sadness setting on the emotional equalizer. (This was the beauty of the preamble to Up, too.)"

- Wesley Morris, Grantland

 

User Opinion

 

"Not only is this unquestionably the best Pixar film since Toy Story 3, this actually might be a contender for best movie of the 2010s so far. With Inside Out, Pete Docter tops the accomplishments he achieved with Up. This is one of the most complex and emotionally honest portraits ever on the state of the human psyche. While the movie mainly looks inside the mind of a young girl, the ideas and messages are universal in their appeal. Anyone who claims that Pixar has lost any of their luster should be silenced forever with this. Their best movies work on various different levels, offering a fun and colorful for children while providing some fascinating observations for adults. This is one of their very best. Inside Out also strikes the perfect balance between laughs and heartbreak. For a film that examines human emotions and memories, it will elicit of plenty of different kinds from the audience. While there are many moments that had me in stitches, there are moments of undeniable power that even the most cold-hearted person could choke up at. The voice cast is excellent too, but there are two stand outs. The first is Amy Poehler, who brings to Joy to life in a vivid vocal performance that recalls Ellen Degeneres' Dory in Finding Nemo. The other is Richard Kind, whose Bing Bong becomes one of the most memorable characters ever (his final scene: good god, I still haven't fully recovered). As is always the case with Pixar, the animation is incredible: the world inside Riley's mind is full of such visual detail that repeat viewings are sure to reveal new things. And Michael Giacchino delivers another memorable score for a Pixar film. Memories play a huge part in shaping who we become in our lives, and Inside Out tackles the subject in the way the animation studio does best. It's going to take something really special to come along and try to top this as my choice for the best film of 2015." - @filmlover

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

Joy, Sadness, Disgust

 

Don't forget anger and fear

 

Managing the psyche

 

Inside_Out_crop_t600x326.jpg?747abc96cc2

 

Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - N/a, 2013 - N/a, 2014 - N/a, 2016 - 40, 2018 - 20

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Steven Spielberg - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,  Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Francis Ford Coppola - 1, Frank Darabont - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Pete Docter - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lean - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 9, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 2, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 6, 1970s - 7, 1980s - 10, 1990s - 15, 2000s - 15, 2010s - 15

 

 

Edited by The Panda
  • Like 11
  • Astonished 4
  • ...wtf 1
  • Disbelief 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, The Panda said:

z458ztc.png

 

g53wmhH.png

giphy.gif

Edited by Rorschach
  • Like 3
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Plain Old Tele said:


I’m thinking of demanding that lists

contain at least 50 movies. 🧐 So maybe it wouldn’t. 

If you need help with writing plot summaries, I am your guy. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Guidelines. Feel free to read our Privacy Policy as well.