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The Panda

BOT's Top 100 Movies of All Time - Hindsight is 2020 Edition

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I like how they showed Coppola in two different boxes when they announce the winner, just to show that he directed two Best picture nominees , Godfather Part II and The conversation in a same year with Godfather II named as winner and forever remember as one of the best in history of visual art.    

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"Dinosaurs eat man. Woman inherits the earth."

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"Huge advancements in scientific technology have enabled a mogul to create an island full of living dinosaurs. John Hammond has invited four individuals, along with his two grandchildren, to join him at Jurassic Park. But will everything go according to plan? A park employee attempts to steal dinosaur embryos, critical security systems are shut down and it now becomes a race for survival with dinosaurs roaming freely over the island."

 

Its Legacy

 

"Legendary visual effects magician Dennis Muren admitted that two decades ago while supervising the full-motion dinosaurs on Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park — a film that would become a defining work in the history of visual effects — he “wasn’t aware of how much of a game-changer it was going to be.”  But George Lucas knew. Speaking with The Hollywood Reporter, Muren recalled that while working on Jurassic Park at Lucas’ Industrial Light & Magic VFX house, "George came by, and I said I was hoping that [someday] we could do something like 2001: A Space Odyssey. George said, 'you don’t know it, but you’re working on it.'"  That same year, Tim Alexander started his first industry job at Disney’s former Buena Vista Visual Effects, and a group from the team went to see Jurassic Park. "We were blown away; we weren’t doing anything remotely like what ILM was doing," said Alexander, who 20 years later would find himself at ILM as VFX supervisor on Jurassic World. "Jurassic Park was a huge leap forward, everyone recognized it. It was a milestone in the switch over to the computer realm."

 

Muren — who recently celebrated 40 years at ILM — is the most honored artist in his field, having won a remarkable nine Oscars in VFX for such seminal films as The Empire Strikes Back, E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial, The Abyss, Terminator 2: Judgment Day and, of course, Jurassic Park.  The latter brought to the screen the most realistic dinosaurs audiences had ever seen at that time, a combination of animatronics and fully computer-generated creatures. The CG work was difficult, and during production even Muren had moments of doubt. "I had never seen CG skin that looked real, other than some university research. [Before Jurassic Park] we did T2, and that was complicated. We did a lot of tests to see if we could make the dinosaurs work. It was a lot of algorithms, [for instance] to see if we keep the creatures’ skin from tearing. We had the fallback of stop motion."  Some of the advances were further extensions of CG research and development that was used on their prior film T2. "But I don't think Hollywood saw the potential [of digital] with T2," Muren admitted. "I think Hollywood didn’t know what they were looking at."

- Carolyn Giardina, The Hollywood Reporter

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

jurassic_park_sacle_.jpg?itok=C-j0Auc_

 

Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"Back in 1993, what was astonishing in "Jurassic Park" were the special effects that seemed to bring dinosaurs back to life. Two decades later, rediscovering Steven Spielberg's mastery of cinematic storytelling is the best reason to go see it again.  My favorite moment has always been when the characters in a Jeep are trying to outrace the charging T-rex. All of a sudden, we see a toothy dinosaur coming at them fast and angry in the side-view mirror. It takes a moment for the words to register: "Objects in mirror are closer than they appear." Spielberg has found a way to make us laugh and ramp up the tension

 

The film holds up remarkably well, other than the computers and walkie-talkies, which will seem to today's audiences almost as prehistoric as the paleolithic creatures. But its then-state-of-the-art special effects, a combination of mechanical creations and computer images, are still as believable as the high-techiest creatures onscreen today.  Spielberg has gone on to weightier and more prestigious projects, but this thrill ride is one of his best and a masterpiece of the genre. It shows his unparalleled gifts for pacing and for the visual language of movies, and his ability to make us invest in the characters. That is what makes all the special effects pack an emotional wallop. He conveys more with ripples in a glass of water than most filmmakers can with 15 pages of dialogue."

- Nell Minow, RogerEbert.com

 

User Opinion

 

"Fantastic film.Saw it a few days after it was released back in 1993, the first time I saw the dinosaurs, I had tears of joy, it was one of those moments that I've yet to see repeated with any other film since then.However, the movie is not about dinosaurs or even human beings, it even ask the question how can human beings live in the technological nightmare worlds they have constructed for themselves? We see many moments of this where Neill's character is annoyed with how he can't get along with technology, or when the leading characters argue about the import of Jurassic Park, or even another character amazed over a can of shaving foam which is really a secret storage container for smuggling embryosPlenty of times in the movie the heroes themselves are dealing with technological hazards then dinosaurs. The car falling out of the tree, the perimeter fence turned on, how the characters at the main base are unable to get anything working. Educated, intelligent people are helpless before failed or refusing to work technology (Phones aren't working!), which is as helpless as when faced with a T. Rex or a Raptor. This is where the brilliance of the film lies. The real meaning is dinosaurs are technology too, as highlighted when a velociraptor in a brilliant shot, is bathed in the light of a computer monitor, and suddenly appears as a collection of computer data constructions." - @BoxOfficeZ

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

Stomp, stomp, here he comes

 

Coming to eat my face off

 

Yum, yum, T-Rex feed

 

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Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 38, 2013 - 27, 2014 - 9, 2016 - 35, 2018 - 19

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Steven Spielberg - 4,  Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Francis Ford Coppola - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,   David Lean - 2, Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Michael Curtiz - 1, Frank Darabont - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Pete Docter - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Lana and Lilly Wachowski - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 9, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, The Godfather - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, Jurassic Park - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, The Matrix - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 3, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 7, 1970s - 8, 1980s - 10, 1990s - 17, 2000s - 15, 2010s - 15

 

 

 

Edited by The Panda
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"I can't carry it for you... but I can carry you!"

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"The final confrontation between the forces of good and evil fighting for control of the future of Middle-earth. Frodo and Sam reach Mordor in their quest to destroy the One Ring, while Aragorn leads the forces of good against Sauron's evil army at the stone city of Minas Tirith."

 

Its Legacy

 

"The Lord of the Rings is filled with great adventure and fighting scenes to literally last a day. In 2002, the final installment, the Return of the King hit theaters. Director Peter Jackson had already given us glimpeses of what he can do and what to expect from the two previous Lord of the Rings films. However, the special effects on the Return of the King definitely up the two previous films.  The use of orcs instantly jumps out when thinking of special effects. The orcs, under Sauron's control, are attempting to rule Middle earth. Jacksons use a special effects can be seen at full throttle during the final battle at the castle of Minas Tirith. Orcs and battle elephants are creatures created by Jackson and his team as the antagonists. Elves, dwarfs, men, and an undead army make up the protagonists. Jackson and his team create a make-believe Middle earth battle for it all. The winner between Man vs orcs takes the world.

 

His special effects go up an extra notch with the undead army that is created. This is an army that consists of old ancient warriors. The “green walkers” are creepy and hideous, but accepted since they are on man's side. The introduction of these ghosts wildly stirs and hooks viewers with a creepy and mysterious emotion. The realistic view of these ghosts can bring nightmares to ones sleep. It is amazing how a ghostly effect can extremely change how we see and what we think of a character. Without the green ghostly image, the soldiers look like the men currently defending the castle. Once the effect is added, they look like things you hope to only see in movies, and may have to remind yourself that it is only a movie.

 

On top of Jackson's special effects, his camera angles on the wars and Frodo’s adventures are magnificent. With so much going on it's easy for one to get lost in the action. Every camera angle follows a chronological order and always includes a main character. The chronological order makes the film easier to follow. The inclusion of main characters in every scene also plays with our emotions, since they do not always win. We see them win some battles; we see them lose some battles. He includes camera angles from both sides to keep a wide variety of emotions within the viewer."

- Richard Pescrillo, Keeping it Reel

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

Lord.jpg

 

Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"In the third part of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord Of The Rings, the burden of carrying the ring of power weighs more heavily on Frodo the closer he comes to his final destination. No doubt Peter Jackson, the director who took on the monster task of adapting Rings, knows how that feels by now. Released one per year for the last three years, Jackson's films have taken on more weight and created greater anticipation with each installment. The Fellowship Of The Ring proved that Jackson and his co-screenwriters, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, were more than capable of bringing Tolkien to the screen with an eye toward large-scale spectacle as well as a respect for the original story, characters, and themes. The Two Towers did it one better. Ratcheting up the intensity on every level, it took the series to the same place as Tolkien's books: the realm of shared cultural myth. Jackson doesn't buckle under the burden of winding it down with The Return Of The King, either; in fact, he lets the weightiness define the film.

 

All in all, it's a fitting conclusion to the series, and yet there are disappointments built in. For one, Jackson has opted not to film Tolkien's downbeat "Scouring Of The Shire" epilogue. This is less a matter for purists than it sounds, since it leaves the central conflict as a grand clash between the easily identifiable forces of good and evil, while ignoring the persistence of evil in everyday life. A faint whiff of formula hits the air, as well, as Towers' speech-battle-lull rhythms kick in about halfway through. But these are quibbles, the kind of minor letdowns that can only be created by great expectations. In another instance of the production echoing the plot, The Return Of The King ultimately proves up to the series' increasingly difficult task: making movies that echo legends, making legends that reflect life, and reconciling it all with the fact that both legends and lives all eventually meet their ends." - Keith Phipps, The AV Club

 

User Opinion

 

"Amazing third act of the greatest movie ever made." - @CoolioD1 prior to seeing Roman J. Israel Esq.

 

"One of the greatest movie achievements in modern day history, and one of my top favorites!" - @Warhorse

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

I set sail out west

 

Leaving behind all my pain

 

A hurt taken root

 

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Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 9, 2013 - 15, 2014 - 4, 2016 - 8, 2018 - 6

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Steven Spielberg - 4,  Richard Linklater - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Francis Ford Coppola - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Peter Jackson - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,   David Lean - 2, Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Hayao Miyazaki - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Michael Curtiz - 1, Frank Darabont - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Pete Docter - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Lana and Lilly Wachowski - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 9, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, The Lord of the Rings - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,  Studio Ghibli - 2, Die Hard - 1, The Godfather - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, Jurassic Park - 1, The Matrix - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 3, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 7, 1970s - 8, 1980s - 10, 1990s - 17, 2000s - 16, 2010s - 15

 

 

 

 

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lowest placement ever, the LOTR stans retreated a bit this year!

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2 minutes ago, The Stingray said:

Jurassic Park is good and all but it's not even top 10 Spielberg.
 

"6 top 15 placements" grow the hell up people.

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Rest easy @Plain Old Tele, the final animation on the countdown has come.  Ghibli outranks the Pixar for the first time!

 

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"You don't remember your name?"

 

About the Movie

 

Synopsis

 

"10-year-old Chihiro and her parents are riding along during a family outing through the countryside when they stumble across an amusement park that has seemingly been abandoned for years. Despite Chihiro's premonitions about the creepy setting, her parents explore the area and eventually discover and indulge in an empty eatery filled with fresh food. As a result of their unfaithfulness, they are magically turned into pigs, which in turn scares away Chihiro. She meets the enigmatic Haku, who explains to her that this land is actually a magical bath house, a kind of holiday resort, where supernatural beings seek comfort away from the earthly realm and she must work here, as laziness is not permitted, to free both herself and her parents from the mystical land."

 

Its Legacy

 

"In July 2012, Roger wrote about viewing “Spirited Away” for a third time and how he was then “struck by a quality between generosity and love.” It was during that viewing he “began to focus on the elements in the picture that didn’t need to be there.” Recently, I was re-reading that essay as I was watching the Blu-ray of "Spirited Away" three times (Japanese, English dub and back to Japanese) back-to-back-to-back.   Suddenly, I was struck by the visual cues Hayao Miyazaki presents in the beginning of the film that set up the character of Chihiro before she becomes Sen. I called it my A-ha moment.  Chihiro has been characterized as whiny, but I think if you understand her situation and contrast her intuitiveness with her parents' obliviousness, she seems less so. In the real world before she becomes Sen, there is no doubt she is a bit sullen. Not unlike Riley in Pixar's "Inside Out," she's unhappy with being forced to move away from her friends. Her friends have given her a nice bouquet. If there are five stages of loss and grief (denial/isolation, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance), then Chihiro is at the end of denial, and her comment about how unfortunate it is to get her first bouquet as a farewell gift indicates she is entering anger.

 

In the following scenes, Miyazaki exploits the visual nature of the Japanese language. Japanese is not like English. Instead of an alphabet, it uses two syllabary systems and Chinese characters. The syllabary systems, hiragana and katakana, originated from Chinese characters, but are used to represent syllables. Hiragana is used for post-positionals and parts of words not fully expressed by Chinese characters (such as inflections for verbs and adjectives). Katakana is used for foreign words and onomatopoeia. Chinese characters often symbolize concrete things. Japanese poetry is filled with wordplay and the following scenes are filled with visual cues and words that can have double meanings.  On the first building we see an incomplete phrase. Alone the character 正 would be read "sho" or "sei" and means right, righteous, justice and genuine, but 正 also suggests 正しい, meaning correct, right, honest and truthful. There's more signs on the shops in the main road. At first casual glance as we go by, it does seem like they are all part of advertising for restaurants, but on closer examination, that proves not to be true.

 

When we get to the main street we see the characters 市場 for market (ichiba) and the word 自由 (jiyuu) for freedom. Then there are some disquieting Chinese characters. The mother says that all the places are restaurants. When you see 天 float by you might think 天ぷら (for tempura), but actually the characters are: 天祖 (tensoo) for the ancestral goddess of the sun, Amaterasu. In one frame we see only 天狗 (tengu), with "ten" above and "gu" below.  The character 狗 means dog, but can be used for dog meat (狗肉)which is not commonly eaten in Japan (and could suggest the homophone 苦肉 or "kuniku," which literally means bitter meat meaning a countermeasure that requires personal sacrifice. The character usually used for dog is 犬. Tengu, however, or heavenly dog, a legendary creature or supernatural being (yookai) that can be either harbingers of war or protective spirits of the mountains and forests.  Floating at the corner of one building is 骨 which means bone and it could be a restaurant term as in the creamy broth: 豚骨 (tonkotsu) which is literally pig bone. Yet bone or "hone" is used in idiomatic phrases such as hone-nashi meaning to lack moral backbone.

 

Some of the Chinese characters are just a little off, enough to make you think. Most obviously is the one syllabary and one Chinese character that are written backwards when we look above at the arch. The characters are 飢と食と会 which seem to substitute for 飢える (ueru, to starve), 食べる(taberu, to eat)  and 会う(au, to meet). The と signifies "and." It should read eat ( 食べる), drink (飲む) and meet (会う) or something like that, but the last two symbols are backwards on either side. Looking at these, perhaps Chihiro senses something is wrong.

 

The movie is called "Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi" (千と千尋の神隠し). Sen means a thousand, but the pronunciation of the character can change to "chi" as it does in the name Chihiro. The "hiro" in Chihiro means to ask questions. Kamikakushi means spirited away with kami meaning spirit or god and kakushi meaning hidden. So perhaps we can translate the title as "Sen and the Mysterious Disappearance of Chihiro."  "Spirited Away" was released in in July 2001. Most Studio Ghibli movies were released in July, and in Japan, I feel this is especially significant in the case of "Spirited Away" and "When Marnie Was There" because it is the Obon season, a time when Japanese believe the spirits of their ancestors walk the earth and return to their furusato (hometown). That time period (mid-July to August) is, much like New Year's week, a hard time to get things done in Japan due to the various celebrations and the people who leave on vacation. We do learn later in the movie that the character on the first building, 正, is part of a combination 正月 which we translate to mean New Year.  Although Roger didn't read or speak Japanese, he saw the rich detail. This is one of those movies worthy of a frame-by-frame analysis. For the people who read Japanese, some of what I have written above may have been intuitively realized. There are other things I still wonder about such as the prominence of the Japanese syllables of “me” and “yu” throughout. I’ve read one theory that put together into “yume” it means “dream.” I’d enjoy hearing other people’s thoughts, theories and feelings about “Spirited Away.”

- Jana Monji, RogerEbert.com

 

From the Filmmaker

 

 

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Why It's the Greatest

 

Critic Opinion

 

"Enchanting and impressively crafted, this 2002 Japanese animation by Hayao Miyazaki fulfills the twin criteria of a classic fantasy: it transports us to an alternate world with a beguiling logic all its own, and in doing so it teaches us to understand ourselves better. Chihiro, a bratty ten-year-old, is moving to a new home with her yuppie parents, and when they stop at a country inn for food, the girl is whisked away to a hot-springs bathhouse (modeled after Japanese and Mediterranean castles) where spirits of all shapes, sizes, and temperaments come for rest and recreation. What follows is a series of surreal adventures involving a spidery furnace stoker, the greedy proprietress of the bathhouse, her spoiled giant of a baby, a No-masked ghost, and a kind young man who can morph into a dragon. The hand-drawn animation from Miyazaki's studio is a feast for the eye, assimilating everyone from Monet to Kitagawa Utamaro to Henry Darger."

- Chicago Reader

 

User Opinion

 

"A masterpiece. One of my favorite films ever, not only animated. Probably in my top 10 or top 15. Pure magic." - @peludo

 

"My favourite Myiazaki film. The creature and people design and the design of the bathhouse itself are outstanding! The plot is a bit like an adventure game (get item or collect favour to advance) but the single episodes are all very original; the film is full of little surprises, often funny and sometimes touching. Also, from a technical POV, the animation is propably the best ever coming out of Studio Ghibli. At least among the films I've seen which are not too many." - @IndustriousAngel

 

The Panda's Haiku

 

Will I remember?

 

Will the spirits keep me here?

 

How can I forget?

 

CJ4v0ClWcAA_-mA.jpg

 

Factoids

 

Placement on Prior Lists

 

2012 - 64, 2013 - 38, 2014 - 68, 2016 - 62, 2018 - 28

 

Director Count

 

Alfred Hitchock - 4, Stanley Kubrick - 4, Steven Spielberg - 4,  Richard Linklater - 3, Hayao Miyazaki - 3, The Russo Brothers - 3, Lee Unkrich - 3, Brad Bird - 2, James Cameron - 2, Francis Ford Coppola - 2, Alfonso Cuaron - 2,  David Fincher - 2, Akira Kurosawa - 2, John Lasseter - 2,   David Lean - 2, Sergio Leone - 2, John McTiernan - 2, Christopher Nolan - 2, Martin Scorsese - 2, Andrew Stanton - 2, Quentin Tarantino - 2, Roger Allers - 1, John G. Avildsen - 1, Ash Brannon - 1, Mel Brooks - 1, Frank Capra - 1, John Carpenter - 1, Damien Chazelle - 1, Ron Clements - 1, Michael Curtiz - 1, Frank Darabont - 1, Jonathan Demme - 1, Pete Docter - 1, Stanley Donen - 1, Clint Eastwood - 1, Victor Fleming - 1, Terry Gilliam - 1, Michel Gondry - 1, Peter Jackson - 1, Rian Johnson - 1, Terry Jones - 1, Bong Joon-Ho - 1, Gene Kelly - 1, David Lynch - 1, Katia Lund - 1, Michael Mann - 1, Fernando Meirelles - 1, Rob Minkoff - 1, Adrian Molina - 1, John Musker - 1, Bob Persichetti - 1, Jan Pinkava - 1, Sam Raimi - 1, Peter Ramsey - 1, Rodney Rotham - 1,  Ridley Scott - 1, Guillermo del Toro - 1, Gary Trousdale - 1, Orson Welles - 1, Peter Weir - 1, Billy Wilder - 1, Lana and Lilly Wachowski - 1, Kirk Wise - 1, Kar-Wai Wong - 1, Robert Zemeckis - 1

 

Franchise Count

 

Pixar - 9, Cameron - 2, Marvel Cinematic Universe - 3, Studio Ghibli - 3, Toy Story - 3, WDAS - 3, Alien - 2, Before Trilogy - 2, Nolan - 2, Scorsese -2, Spider-Man - 2,   Die Hard - 1, The Godfather - 1, Hannibal - 1, Incredibles - 1, Indiana Jones - 1, Jurassic Park - 1, The Lord of the Rings - 1, The Matrix - 1, Monty Python - 1, Oz - 1, Predator - 1, Rocky - 1, Star Wars - 1, Terminator - 1

 

Decade Count

 

1930s - 1, 1940s - 3, 1950s - 6, 1960s - 7, 1970s - 8, 1980s - 10, 1990s - 17, 2000s - 16, 2010s - 15

 

 

Edited by The Panda
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23 minutes ago, Jake Gittes said:

"6 top 15 placements" grow the hell up people.

FalseAdvancedHammerkop-size_restricted.g

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Spirited Away is not one of my favorite Miyazaki movies but I'm happy Ghibli did well on this list 

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6 minutes ago, Jake Gittes said:

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54 minutes ago, The Stingray said:

Jurassic Park is good and all but it's not even top 10 Spielberg.

But it is maybe Spielberg #1

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Just realized I forgot to put Midnight Run in my list. Would've been somewhere right at the end of my list.

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21 minutes ago, lorddemaxus said:

Just realized I forgot to put Midnight Run in my list. Would've been somewhere right at the end of my list.

 You forgot the best movie of 1988? :( 

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3 minutes ago, Plain Old Tele said:

 You forgot the best movie of 1988? :( 

Yeah, I'm bad at making these lists lol.

 

Danny Elfman's amazing (and underrated) score for this just reminded me how much of an awesome movie it is.

 

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36 minutes ago, The Stingray said:

 

 

5 minutes ago, MrGamer said:

 

tenor.gif

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1 hour ago, Barnack said:

But it is maybe Spielberg #1

Nah, no maybe about it....

 

It is Spielberg’s #1!

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