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Rorschach

Y8 Cayom Film Festival - Submissions Closed/The Festival Commences!

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Kicking off Day 3 of the festival is Luca Guadagnino's The World That We Knew, a historical-fiction/fantasy film set during the Holocaust. What verdict did all the judges' come to?

 

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Reddroast

 

The world that we knew is beautiful but flawed. It earns my respect for being a super unique WW2 dealing with Jewish mythology and a mostly strong cast. The film falters in it's length and a subplot involving a doctor. This should have ran in contest.

B+

 

 

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Rorschach

 

Rorschach Reviews’

 

The World That We Knew (dir. Luca Guadagnino)

 

Between Call Me by Your Name and the 2018 remake of Suspiria, Luca Guadagnino has quickly risen to be one of my personal favorite directors of the past few years. So naturally, I was pretty excited to see his new Cayom project premiere at the festival this year. Having now seen it, while I wouldn’t say that The World That We Knew is on the same level of quality that those other two were, I still found this to be a solidly made film, for the most part.

 

Guadagnino’s direction, Alexandre Desplat’s musical score, and the touching on Jewish mythology, something that I’m inherently familiar with, throughout the film all managed to keep me relatively invested. Where the film mainly shines is in the central relationship between Lea and Ava, the latter being a golem intertwined to protect both Lea and her sister Ettie. Dixie Egerickx and Katherine Waterston both do excellent jobs in their respective roles, while Thomasin McKenzie also turns in a pretty good performance as well. In terms of direction and acting, this was overall really solid.

 

However, the film does have its flaws. While the general storyline itself is pretty good, it does at times become a little hard to follow given the large ensemble of characters we follow throughout. To the film’s credit, all of the actors give great individual performances, but with the large abundance of them thrown in together, it made things a little hard to track sometimes. I believe that and a few minor elements that I found a bit iffy were the main factors that kept emotionally connecting with the film.

 

Still, it's a well-made and beautiful period piece that I think implements its fantastical elements a lot more smoothly into its narrative than New Journey Pictures’ other festival film. I don’t quite know what others will think of it but on my end, I thought it was a solid film all around.

 

B

 

 

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Spaghetti

 

The World That We Knew

 

Sometimes, a film in CAYOM comes along with a quality that makes you feel like this could be a true blue film. This doesn't make it necessarily amazing, but you see so much in the story and filmmaking that makes you think it could easily exist in the real world. If the segway wasn't obvious, THE WORLD THAT WE KNEW is such a film. I'm not sure if I would call it perfect, or even nearly perfect, but there is something truly special here.

 

A mosaic of lives fighting to help others against the tyranny of nameless yet legitimately terrifying fascists (The decision not to focus on any Nazi characters gives an interesting subtext - the rich humanity of the characters versus the dehumanizing cruelty of Nazi Germany, treated accordingly) intertwined with aspects of Jewish mythology. I felt a bit hesitant of mixing "fantasy" within a real life tragedy, but the film handles its topic with just enough grace to feel genuine and profound, even leading to an ending that, while maybe feeling like a cop out, genuinely brought a tear to my eye. (I said the same thing about Yin, but this does that much better.)

 

Speaking of the mythology, Katherine Waterson is the soul of the movie, which is a tad ironic given her character. Mixing a deep skill of performance using dialogue and not, she's firing on all cylinders and makes the movie's beating heart. A few moments and supblots feel really....iffy, and I will admit one made me bring my score down a little bit, but there's still a strong enough mosaic that is truly commendable here.

 

Like LEARNING TO CARE, this is still very much an ensemble piece, and most of the cast is absolute aces. I don't think there's a huge standout besides Waterson, but I did quite like Wolfhard and MacKenzie. Nice to see Nadine Hallon hold on to a career.

 

A few awkward moments hold it back from getting a complete recommendation, and it's probably the same stuff @Reddroast mentioned. But one thing for sure is that it's exciting to see @SLAM! continue to blossom as a writer, and this might be one of his strongest, most ambitious works to date. A sure sign that the future of CAYOM is in good hands.

 

8.3/10

 

Edited by Rorschach
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Up next is Anton Corbijn's stylish action-drama film Holland Hannah. And the verdict is....

 

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Reddroast

 

This film is a very mixed bag... The slick visual style works with the soundtrack very well and Debicki and Sy have excellent chemistry together. However, the weak supporting cast and over-reliance on the aforementioned soundtrack makes it feel like Kayne West's short film Runaway than an actual film.

 

C+

 

 

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Rorschach Reviews'

 

Holland Hannah (dir. Anton Corbijn)

 

If you’re looking for a film that’ll give you a high dosage of 90s nostalgia, look no further than Holland Hannah, a film that is absolutely drenched in it. I’d say it's pretty much the love child of Drive and Atomic Blonde, two hyper-stylized action films with a heavy injection of music added in to boot.

 

Easily the film’s most commendable aspect is in the technical fields. The cinematography is eye-popping and hallucinatory and the action scenes are all filmed to perfection and a treat to watch on screen (if nothing more than to the simple must-watch factor of Elizabeth Debicki kicking ass). However, the biggest surprise standout is the film’s soundtrack. It’s probably fair to say that 2/3rds to about 3/4ths of the film’s runtime is composed of electronic-pop songs playing in the background of the scenes and their usage is nothing short of invigorating. The songs almost single-handedly manage to carry the entire weight of the film on their backs but I mean that in a good way.

 

Unfortunately, the film falls well short in regards to one of the more important aspects of any film: the story and the characters. Beneath all the glitz and glamour of the film’s soundtrack and technical prowess, there’s really not a ton of substance to really latch onto. Elizabeth Debicki is great and the lead and most of the actors do a pretty job with what they’re given… but I couldn’t help but feel a missing connection to everything that was going on in the plot. The romance that sparks up between Debicki and Adam Brody’s characters, the latter coming in roughly halfway through the film’s runtime, has a decent foundation to start with but it comes a bit too late into the film and the escalation up to their love scene was a bit too fast to my liking. When it ended, I couldn’t help but feel that I wanted a lot more from it than I actually got.

 

With that all said, I still had an enjoyable time with this film. You can’t really mess up a film that features Elizabeth Debicki kicking ass to 90s electro music too hard and still not have a high level of awesomeness to it. I just couldn’t escape the fact that the film doesn’t really have much substance outside of those aspects.

 

B-

 

 

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Spaghetti

 

Holland Hannah

 

One thing you’ll quickly notice with HOLLAND HANNAH is its pulse pounding soundtrack. The film itself feels more like a ninety minute music video, a razor thin plot that exists solely to switch together stylish visuals and editing with a pulse pounding soundtrack. I never really got to care for the characters in this, including Adam Brody, who arguably arrives too late into the film to make an impact, although I did admire a bold aspect of the ending that legitimately caught me by surprise.

 

Still, even at 90 minutes, I felt like this was a story that would fit a short film. Sometimes, it feels like a CAYOM riff of DRIVE, but even that had a stronger emotional core than what we have. You can see a lot of elements in the style and plot, but for the most part, the characters feel surface level at best, and you’re just wondering what track you maybe recognize from a weird internet video next.

 

At the same time, I’m not really sure if it needed to be anything more than what it was. I will automatically adore anything with Elizabeth Debicki (and she's great as an action "heroine" in this), and the soundtrack and action set pieces offer sufficiently sweet candy for the eyes and ears. You’re not going to see a lot that holds your memory after you leave the theater, but you could do worse.

 

6.4/10

 

Edited by Rorschach
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Capping off the evening of films is Beast of the Southern Wild and Wendy director Benh Zeitlin's fantasy/drama Sandboy. What was the consensus among the judges?

 

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Reddroast

 

Sandboy is an live-action ghibli film in every sense. Following a dissolution of a family during a pandemic summer, the fantasy elements mix perfectly with the family drama. the film is bursting with emotion. Everyone is perfect in their roles.

A

 

 

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Rorschach Reviews’

 

Sandboy (dir. Benh Zeitlin)

 

Very disappointed this was not a prequel origin story to Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman and just some dumb arthouse film. Do not appreciate the false advertising.

 

F

 

I jest, I jest.

 

While I have not seen either of Benh Zeitlin’s irl films (Beasts of the Southern Wild and Wendy), I can confidently say, knowing what I know about both of those films and having read Sandboy, that this seems like it would fit in well right alongside those other films. 

 

The way I’d describe Sandboy is that it feels a combination of a Terrence Malick and Hayao Miyazaki film, mixing the former’s beautiful filmmaking and transcendental themes with the latter’s focus on childhood/grounded narratives that is intermixed with fantastical elements. The resulting combination of all these elements creates for a simple but unforgettably beautiful tale of finding joy and purpose within a state of isolation, loneliness, and crumbling relationships.

 

The filmmaking presented here is marvelous, with Zeitlin’s command behind the camera bringing forth some of the most awe-inspiring visual imagery that I’ve seen so far this year. All four of the main actors are fantastic, with the two child actors playing Bree and Arthur giving some of the best child performances I’ve ever seen. They are a complete joy to watch on-screen together and every moment spent with them brought the biggest smile to my face.

 

While I would not go as far as to say I liked this more than Learning to Care, which I think I personally connected a bit more with, this comes incredibly close to surpassing that film’s quality at times. It is an undeniably beautiful and poignant picture of childhood. And in a time where genuine joy has been hard to come by, I am always grateful to get something that reminds me of that joy and brings a little bit of it back to me.

 

A-

 

 

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Spaghetti

 

Sandboy

 

Azhy Robertson starring in a film about a failing relationship of a couple with a young child? Hmm….

 

I digress. It’s always exciting to watch someone in CAYOM try their hand at emulating a truly distinctive director’s style. In this case, Behn Zeitlin. In only two films (one which I WILL SEE GOD DAMNIT), he has a magical way of looking at the world, creating fantastical realms where the bleakness of reality lies intertwined with the innocence, wonder, and hope of childhood. SANDBOY is very much this film sticking to the filmmaker’s guns, but let’s see how it really shows.

 

First off, every shot in this is pure, absolute beauty. Whether Bree is playing with Sandboy in fantastical worlds with radiant colors, or she's coping with the failing relationship of her parents, the camera always knows when to embrace grandiose imagination or let things simmer on subtle moments. With the powerful score from Dan Romer, a composer who Zeitlin knows how to bring the best out of, you have a true feast for the eyes and ears on this one.

 

It seemed that there was little doubt that this film would be a work of technical magic, but the film shines just as radiantly in its simple, yet poignant story. The film always keeps it simple when it needs to but lets its story be told in such a vivid, wondrous style that you become invested in each of these characters, for all of their flaws. Style and substance work in glorious tandem here.

 

Films about divorce and collapsing relationships are plenty common, but focusing on the perspective of a child who feels increasingly lonely and years for any sense of joy gives the film a perfect potpurri for Zeitlin to work with. I do think a bit more could have been done to work in the nature of the pandemic into the film's plot, which wouldn't be too different in a normal setting, but it heightens the fear of isolation and a desperation to have something to cling to and someone to believe in. A lot of people have said that Learning to Care has one of the best endings in CAYOM 3.0, but it's this ending that really moved me and brought a wave of emotions to my heart.

 

There's something so pure and beautiful about it, and I can safely hope that this gets plenty of hype as it releases to a wider audience. SANDBOY, like many great films, weaves absolute magic out of something so simple.

 

9.3/10

 

Edited by Rorschach
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Well, I figure I better respond to the reviews for The World That We Knew. I had a gut feeling telling me that I shouldn't think the film is perfect. But I'm really happy that it's as solid a film as it is! Major credit goes to the original book--it's a great book!

Edited by SLAM!

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Metacritic for the fest so far (including grades in the reactions thread):

 

Learning to Care - 92 (7 grades)

Sandboy - 90 (5 grades)

The World That We Knew - 80 (3 grades)

Numbers Theory 67 (5 grades)

Holland Hannah - 59 (5 grades)

White Wyvern - 17 (3 grades)

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Day 4 of the festival has arrived and the judges have just finished up with the day's only film: Debra Granik's mystery film The Space Between Trees. How did our judges feel about the film?

 

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Reddroast

 

The space between trees is what I hoped a certain y7 film was. Debra Granik is in the drivers seat for best director. Olivia Delonte is sure to get many roles after this as is Jack Reynor. EGK's hot streak continues.

A+

 

 

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Rorschach Reviews’

 

The Space Between Trees (dir. Debra Granik)

 

……….....huh.

 

When I saw that we were getting a Debra Granik film this year, my curiosity and intrigue spiked upward by tenfold. With Granik’s previous film Paradise Island being one of my favorite films in the past few game years, I was really hyped to see what her new project would be like. From the premise, it sounded like it’d be an entirely different film from Paradise and much more closely resembling one of Granik’s other films, the mystery film Winter’s Bone. To put it shortly, I was really excited to read this film.

 

Now that I’ve read the film though….. I gotta be totally upfront and honest, I don’t know what to make of it. 

 

Apart of me just feels like I’m incredibly dumb and missing something vital here – that could and might very well be the case. But as I’m trying to process my thoughts on the film right now, there’s a part of me that feels like I got tripped up somewhere in the middle of the film and fell completely behind on what was happening because, for a good majority of it, it felt as though I was walking through the woods in the middle of the night, believing I knew where I was going but then finding out that I’d gotten myself more lost than I originally was before. 

 

It’s just… I don't really know how to put it into words about what threw me off here. Given that this is mainly a murder-mystery film, it does feel like a given that there would be elements thrown in to twist up the plot and raise more questions as the film goes along, and in the end, tying all those elements together in a way that makes everything came before makes sense in retrospect. 

 

Much of the bulk of the film’s second act is dedicated to doing this, and while I was confused by a lot of things – mainly with certain character motivations and actions that didn’t make sense in the moment as well as certain revelations about those characters that make you wonder whether they were the ones who did it or not – I figured that the third act of the film would clear up a lot of those answers. 

 

However, when everything was all said and done, I was just left scratching my head and feeling even more frustrated than I was before. Perhaps that was intentional or maybe it wasn’t, I have no idea. All I know for sure was that I was left feeling incredibly frustrated, which I think is far different than simply saying that I was confused by it. Being confused can either be a bad thing or a good thing, depending on the film. Here though, I was definitely in the camp of the former, and the lingering feeling I had afterward was that of frustration.

 

I know it sounds like I’m being incredibly negative towards the film but, rest assured, I did think there were a lot of good elements present in the film. The first act itself is alright and the set-up was intriguing enough to make me go along with the rest of the film. Granik’s direction and style is pretty solid, as it is across pretty much all of her films. The performances as well were solid. While I was a bit iffy on her character, I thought Olivia DeJonge managed to sell her role as Evie pretty well for the most part. Jack Reynor and Christopher Meloni also give really good individual performances, especially the latter who, in my opinion, was generally in and pretty much the best element in every scene that he was in.

 

Sadly, all of those elements were mostly eclipsed by that looming feeling of frustration that I had throughout the majority of the film’s runtime. I’m seriously planning to go back and reread this whenever we get to Part 2 of Y8. Granted, I’m planning to do that with all the festival films to have them fresh in my mind when comparing them to the rest of the year’s slate for my Top 25 list, but I especially want to try and re-evaluate the film to see if there was something I was missed the first time I read it. We’ll have to see if that is the case when we get to that stage of the game.

 

For now, though, I just have to give my honest rating here that I think is a good reflection about how torn I am over this film. Sorry.

 

C+/B-

 

 

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Spaghetti

 

The Space Between Trees

 

Fair warning that I'm not sure if this score is going to be a full reflection of what I ultimately think. I honestly think that this may be something I have to read again, and I don't know if I was in the right headspace for it. It could go up or down, but I think I need a second opinion.

 

This is...definitely not the kind of usual fare we get in CAYOM. A dark, mood piece with a deeply somber tone and two starkly defined antiheroines (the first few scenes alone show that you're not exactly going to sympathize much with the protagonist), there's a fascinating and sobering aura surrounding this entire film. It's enough to keep you wondering where things are going to go and how the plot will flow, but it's certainly a story that rakes you through the coals, centering on two deeply flawed young women who try to investigate the murder of their "friend" outside of police help, while also becoming ensnared within the dark characters that surrounded their life.

 

DeJonge and Silvers are the key reason the film works, along with Granik's direction. The Space Between Trees, as I mentioned, is largely a mood piece, but it's carried by terrific performances by the two aforementioned actresses. Beyond their believable chemistry, they embody the flaws, darkness, yet pieces of humanity within these characters. You wouldn't be off base to compare it to THOROUGHBREDS but with straight drama instead of morbid comedy.

 

As a whole, though, I'm still not quite sure how I felt about the plot. There isn't a lot of purely objectionable or shocking material that could completely throw you off guard, like in, say, BORRASCA or IN THE AEROPLANE... but it's a story where...I guess I was kind of expecting more and less than what we got, if that makes sense. A lot of it doesn't quite have the impact to resonate me and invest me in all of these characters, even as I felt curious how the cookie would crumble,  but I wouldn't even fault the ending too much in this regard, although I did feel that things resolved a bit too quickly. I guess the script just didn't wrap me in as much as the other elements of the film, and it feels like its spins it wheels for too long.

 

That said, this is a reason why I mentioned the disclaimer, and there's enough fascinating material here to make this film well worth your while. I've been kind of swamped all day, so I'm not sure if this is the score I'm going to stick with, but needless to say, I'm very curious what the wider audience makes of this. 

 

8/10

 

Edited by Rorschach
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On our 5th and final day of the film festival, we end off with the latest addition to the Numerator Pictures crime film pantheon, Dan Gilroy's Dirty Hands. Let's see what the judges had to say about this...

 

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Reddroast

 

Dirty Hands feel like another film by Numbers, 24 Hours. However where 24 Hours it's containment to it's advantage... Hands feels somewhat bloated and mundane. The film uses strong performances from Carrie Coon, Sterling K. Brown and Jeremy Strong to keep the film elevated and intelligent.

 

B

 

 

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Rorschach Reviews’

 

Dirty Hands (dir. Dan Gilroy)

 

Continuing in the tradition of the Numerator Pictures’ crime films (which has practically become its sub-genre within the crime genre itself), Dirty Hands is yet another solid entry to that growing line-up of films. Whether you’re a big fan of those kinds of films, there is no denying that Dirty Hands is a well-crafted and sharply directed feature. 

 

Perhaps one of the most surprising elements of the film is its similarities to another Numerator crime film: 24 Hours. Aside from the obvious shared element of Carrie Coon delivering an amazing lead performance, it also shares a similar focus on a white-collar man finds himself awaiting trial for his involvement in a crime, while the film goes back to the past to show how he got to where he was in the present. 

 

Having two running storylines played with each other can prove to be a double-edged sword if not done right. One story could be a lot more interesting than the other one and, as a result, can drag the overall film with its burdening weight. While there were some points where, when the film shifted focus to another storyline, I was briefly caught off guard due to my growing investment in where one timeline was going, but I don’t hold it as a negative against the film, considering how compelling both stories were, regardless. 

 

The performances across all of the ensemble are excellent. Aside from Coon, Jeremy Strong and Sterling K. Brown both put in excellent supporting performances, with the former giving a relatively subdued, quiet performance in the present storyline but opening up and allowing us to further understand his character in the past storyline. The dialogue, writing, and political commentary present here are razor-sharp and smart. The twists and turns that the film frequently makes kept me glued and on the edge of my seat throughout, with an incredibly shocking coming just before the start of the film’s third act that left my mouth agape. After that point, I was slightly worried about how things were going to wrap themselves up but thankfully, the third act pulls through in an incredible way, ending on an insanely satisfying note.

 

I don’t really have much else to say, other than Numerator Pictures has managed to deliver yet another great crime thriller film that lives up to some of the great entries in their ever-growing line-up of crime films.

 

A-

 

 

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Spaghetti

 

Dirty Hands

 

The renowned crime sagas from Numerator Productions have taken CAYOM by storm, and for good reason. Equally fascinating, and not restricted to that genre, has been the studio's dive into political ground and commentary, seeping through the darkness within anything from Americana to fantastical realms. DIRTY HANDS promises to continue the trend of this magic, and does it deliver on that?

 

Well, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. One thing that audiences will notice is that, structurally, this has a lot in common with 24 HOURS, and that's not just coming from Carrie Coon delivering another finely razor sharp and focused performance - you'll notice it in the story too - an ambitious white collar worker becoming ensnared in a world of corruption, and the investigators trying to make him break. Even when the story never feels less than compelling, which is thankfully most of the time, you can't shake the feeling that this isn't exactly something you haven't seen before. However, by no means does that break the movie at all.

 

It's just as compelling, and maybe even more deliciously quick witted, as any of Numbers' crime films. There's a brilliant ensemble of performances here, from secretly slimy turns from actors I won't mention here because of spoilers as well as Jeremy Strong as the aforementioned careersman whose path takes a dark turn. They keep you wondering how the poweder keg is going to explode at the end (and you know damn well it's going to), and just how shitty people in high places in this country can be. I will admit that there were a few points I was worried about where the film was ultimately going with its endgame of corruption, but its commentary ends up becoming smart and viciously pointed in the best possible way.

 

The ending swerves in some legitimately shocking ways, but while it does make some of the character work proceeding it a bit jarring (if because it shifts the focus to where I didn't quite have it in the first part), it's ultimately not too much of an issue either, as every line and performance, like I said, has the power of a firecracker, and those last five minutes are absolutely glorious. (Hey, another 24 HOURS parallel.)

 

By this point, you know what you're getting into with movies like this, and with Dan Gilroy's sizzling script, a crew of dedicated performances, and some sharp commentary, there isn't a whole lot Numbers needs to worry about fixing.

 

9/10

 

Edited by Rorschach
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Thanks for the reviews. 

 

It definitely parallels 24 Hours in structure, or rather the other way around, since the original version of this predates OG 24 Hours by a number of years.

 

I am definitely curious how people react to a particular thing you allude to.

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The CYIFF Awards - Volume 1

 

The three judges of the festival - @Rorschach, @Reddroast, and myself - wish to thank everyone who participated, be it as an audience member or a filmmaker. After a careful discussion, we have come to various decisions on awards. Many decisions came extremely down to the wire, but we are grateful for the pool of talent presented this year, and wish to congratulate all involved.

 

Our first award will be for Best Screenplay.

 

The runner up is...

Spoiler

Learning to Care

 

And the winner is...

Spoiler

Dirty Hands

 

Edited by Spaghetti
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The next award will be for Best Performance.

 

For this category, we implemented a unique way to narrow down candidates. Each judge picked their top ten performances of the films in competition. Films in all three lists were then ranked and placed in competition against each other. There were six performances who appeared in our final round.

 

The runner up is...

Spoiler

Carrie Coon (Dirty Hands)

 

And the winner is...

Spoiler

Jimmy Tatro (Learning to Care)

 

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Our third and penultimate award is Best Director.

 

This was by far the most competitive category of the night. Four of the five films in contention differed by one point each, creating two ties of one point apart.

 

The runner up is...

Spoiler

Anton Corbjin (Holland Hannah)

 

And the winner is...

Spoiler

Brett Haley (Learning to Care)

 

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We saved the best for last. It is time to award Best Picture.

 

The runner up is...

Spoiler

CARRIE COON    JEREMY STRONG    STERLING K. BROWN     NICHOLAS HOULT

RAUL ESPARZA    MARK GATISS    CECILE DE FRANCE    ASIA KATE DILLON    ALEXANDER SIDDIG

PRUITT TAYLOR VINCE    STEVE ZAHN    LYNDIE GREENWOOD    TIMOTHY SIMONS

and PAUL GIAMATTI

in...

Dirty Money

a film by DAN GILROY

 

And the winner is...

Spoiler

NICK ROBINSON    BRIGETTE LUNDY-PAINE    JIMMY TATRO

GERLANDINE VISWANATHAN     LEE RODRIGUEZ

with DA'VINE JOY RANDOLPH

and MARGO MARTINDALE

in...

Learning to Care

a film by BRETT HALEY

 

Congratulations to all, and have a wonderful night!

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Good festival to all who took part, and a big thank you to the judges for the work they put in.

 

Hopefully we'll get even more turnout for the next one.

Edited by 4815162342
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Thank you judges for the great honors you have bestowed upon my film, along with the work you did assessing the films in and out-of-competition, and thank you everyone who participated in the festival this year!!

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