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Eric Crawley

Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022)

Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022)  

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  1. 1. What'd You Think?



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highlight of the movie was when someone in the back shouted "did they just turn into a fucking rock?!" during a moment of dead silence.

 

fantastic from start to finish. michelle yeoh has never been better and the plot is amazingly easy to follow given how dense it is. honestly better than anything i saw last year. the last hour goes on a bit too long but i was having so much fun i didn't mind. stephanie hsu is MVP and needs to be in more things.  

A/A+ 

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It's fire.

 

Sometimes they show and tell, sometimes it's just tell, which I appreciate, because there's a lot of information here. We didn't really need a grandiose showing of how Evelyn gets every single ability. Cut a solid 25 minutes from the 3rd act.

 

Spoiler

I appreciate how the heartwarming moment of Evelyn standing up to her father and accepting Joy didn't automatically solve every relationship problem the two ladies had.

 

Edited by Morieris
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It's great to see Michelle Yeoh get to do literally everything: be funny, be sad, be cute, be bad-ass. She pulls it all off effortlessly. 

 

The movie is bonkers and very audacious. It works best in the first hour. As it nears the end of its second hour, with ~30 minutes left to go, proves that you CAN have too much of a good thing. It grows repetitive and becomes too pleased with its own quirky zaniness. And worst of all, the human story and character arc get lost in the mayhem. 

 

Still a strong recommend. B+

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I like the first half of this movie, but the 2nd half is asinine with very trite, almost reductive messaging. And narratively has lot of the same issues as, like, NWH with detailing the lore of multiverses--wheel-spinning and exposition and constant climaxes. Very cool action sequences and it plays broad so I imagine it'll hold well

 

I wrote this in thread but will elaborate more a bit. 

 

I understand the reactions and projections the movie has caused. It throws everything at the well with keen movie references and a sincere heart, but that's also the issue because that overall maximalism is precocious and lacks a real identity or deep perspective. It thematically doesn't go deeper than "lol nothing matters so be kind". It really hedges its bet on that rhetoric which makes the final scene a bit conflicting after almost 140 minutes. 140 minutes that are often redundant and exhausting. For as every imaginative set-piece like the spectacular butt-plug fight, there's another scenes that's dear-air and flat. Also disappointingly none of that ambition translates to the dialogue, most of it is expositional and basic, direct, uncreative. Not just the mostly witless humor but the rekindling and love declarations. Strong performances, though, besides the daughter IMO.

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A film that lives up to the grandiosity of its title, Everything Everywhere All at Once is one of the most joyous times I’ve had watching a movie in a theatre in *years*. Under the highly energetic yet laser-focused direction of Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert (the Daniels), the film is practically bursting at the seams with wild visuals, creative decisions as effective as they are odd, and pure, unbridled energy as it barrels from one eye-popping, convention-defying scene to the next. There is so much going on visually and aurally that I could rattle off descriptions of any twenty images or gags out of context, and you wouldn’t necessarily be able to piece together what they mean – and somehow, they all cohere beautifully in the film itself. And yet, for all the stunning action and broad comedic energy on display, it also tells a satisfying story and sticks the landing on poignant emotional beats concerning family, love, and intergenerational trauma. In front of the camera, the cast is loaded with impressively varied and layered work across the entire ensemble. Michelle Yeoh leads the way with some of the fullest and most impressive work of her entire career. Yeoh is masterful in crafting unassuming laundromat owner-turned-possible multiverse savior Evelyn as a rich, complex, and convincing character whose emotional journey throughout the film feels real at every strange turn. Stephanie Hsu is also mightily impressive as Joy, Evelyn’s troubled daughter, nailing her broader moments with gusto and her more intimate moments with convincingly tender humanity. After a lengthy absence from the screen, Ke Huy Quan – best known as Short Round in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom – is a blast to watch as dramatically different versions of Evelyn’s husband, Waymond; he’s enjoyably badass when scenes call for it, and also hilarious in his meek nebbishness when he needs to be. There are also numerous hilarious moments to around for James Hong, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jenny Slate, and – somehow – even Glee alum Harry Shum, Jr. The craft work is also impeccable, from the aspect ratio-shifting cinematography to inventive set and costume design, and incredibly clever editing and visual effects techniques that play a significant role in the filmmakers succeeding in their go-for-broke approach. I get the feeling that the raves for this film might ultimately feel a bit hyperbolic and lead to unreasonably high expectations for viewers who are later to the party (fitting as hyperbole is for a film that is practically hyperbole made manifest as cinema), but if you’re on this film’s wavelength, it is such a propulsive piece of pure cinematic bravura that it’s hard *not* to be bullish in praising it. If you’re starved for a truly singular cinematic experience, run out and see it.
 

A

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It lives up to the hype and more. A movie of this sort always runs the risk of becoming insufferable and falling apart beneath the weight of its "out there" concept, but that doesn't happen here. This is is what they call The Complete Package: it's exciting, it's hilarious (the butt-plug fight: :hahaha:), it's trippy, and it's surprisingly moving while offering plenty to think about long after it's over. And it's all held together thanks to a flawless lead performance from Michelle Yeoh. One of those actors whose mere presence always adds class to every movie in which she appears, it's wonderful to finally see her land a role that allows her to show off what a versatile performer she really is. Backing her up is an excellent cast: an unrecognizable Jamie Lee Curtis, Ke Huy Quan, Stephanie Hsu, James Hong, and all the other actors add to the wild, emotional experience. Just about everything here is pretty much perfection. It's easily the most innovative movie of 2022 to date, and I wouldn't be surprised if it holds onto that title when the year is over. A

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Greatest movie of all fucking time. It is not even close to anything else. The literal 2nd coming of Jesus Christ. Holy shit, holy shit.

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This movie was everything, everywhere all at once to me. A+++

 

Seriously it's like some of the humor they used they went into my mind and yanked it out of there. It's so funny, so awesome, has super random amazing martial arts fights with random people. something I also thinking about happening like a lot. and that Ratatouille scene was just something else. and the performances, especially Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan, both knocked it out of the park. 

 

This is the best movie I've seen in years, like wow.

 

Looks like we have a best picture/screenplay/director/ actress/supporting actor/ supporting actress(s?)/art direction / editing / visuals effects winner for 2022 already. 

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On 4/12/2022 at 12:04 AM, BestPicturePlutoNash said:

I like the first half of this movie, but the 2nd half is asinine with very trite, almost reductive messaging. And narratively has lot of the same issues as, like, NWH with detailing the lore of multiverses--wheel-spinning and exposition and constant climaxes. Very cool action sequences and it plays broad so I imagine it'll hold well

 

I wrote this in thread but will elaborate more a bit. 

 

I understand the reactions and projections the movie has caused. It throws everything at the well with keen movie references and a sincere heart, but that's also the issue because that overall maximalism is precocious and lacks a real identity or deep perspective. It thematically doesn't go deeper than "lol nothing matters so be kind". It really hedges its bet on that rhetoric which makes the final scene a bit conflicting after almost 140 minutes. 140 minutes that are often redundant and exhausting. For as every imaginative set-piece like the spectacular butt-plug fight, there's another scenes that's dear-air and flat. Also disappointingly none of that ambition translates to the dialogue, most of it is expositional and basic, direct, uncreative. Not just the mostly witless humor but the rekindling and love declarations. Strong performances, though, besides the daughter IMO.

 

So Upset GIF - Darla Little Rascals Can - Discover & Share GIFs

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