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Eric Twister

A Quiet Place: Day One (2024) Spoiler Thread

A Quiet Place: Day One  

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  1. 1. What’d You Think?

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Just now, cinema pal said:

Well the marketing is indeed deceiving. The movie is really sad. No mention of Sam's illness in the trailers though we're told about this in the very beginning of the film and it's kinda very important pleas

Not sure if you should spoil a movie key plot like that.

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I can understand why they hid that in the trailers, you don’t want to bum your potential audience out by making them think it’s just going to be 90 minutes of sadness. I really liked the film though, the cancer plot made it stand apart from the other two films, and the considerably more mournful tone really helps it to feel different. Whether that goes down well with audiences is another matter, I bet the cinemascore takes a hit from the previous two.
 

Lupita and Joseph Quinn were both great, and I hope Quinn and the cat reappear in Part 3. Djimon Hounsou was kind of wasted in what was essentially a cameo though.

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I think it is refreshing to focus a story on an endangered survivor during one of these apocalyptic movies. It should be no surprise that the most vulnerable among us have almost no chance at survival, be it the elderly or people with medical conditions or disabilities. For instance, diabetics who need regular insulin are not going to survive long when the zombies or aliens arrive. There is no hope for certain segments of society in these situations and entertainment media should be more forthcoming with those grim prospects. 

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I too had no idea Lupita’s character was terminal and as soon as I quickly realised I thought “oh wow, this will take things to a whole different level”.


And it did. It was very moving. 

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The first half is pretty great but the movie slowly losing its grip in the second half. They didn’t properly build up the final moment of lupita character’ scarification and “suicide”. It felt the plot got there abruptly. And also Quinn character presence felt forceful because the movie didn’t establish why he has to choose lupita character to follow. 
 

luckily there were few good execution in term of tension to keep the movie felt like a quite place movie. Overall it is a worthy prequel spin off but not exactly necessary.

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So I watched Cody Leach review and  he said that a person who attended the test screening shared some information about earlier cut. So a big chunk of lore expansion was cut here including explanation of those slimey things aliens were eating. And he said he understands why all that was cut.

  If someone has more information please share)

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A highly effective and distinctive entry in the A Quiet Place canon that stands on its own away from the two Krasinski/Blunt films. It's a more melancholic movie than either of those for sure, but I really appreciated the focus on the human condition in a way that one wouldn't expect from a Hollywood-produced alien invasion movie.

 

The decision to go with a big city setting (especially one as immense as NYC) also turns out to be an epic and welcome change of pace. A lot of unsettling images that recall 9/11. These movies are meant to be seen in big auditoriums.

 

Capably carrying the movie, though, is the excellent lead performance from the always reliable Lupita Nyong'o. She's on screen for close to the entire movie, and she ensures that we're invested in Sam's journey as her already difficult reality becomes even more complicated (perfect final shot by the way). Her emotional support cat is also a stand out. Joseph Quinn is fine in the only other role of major significance. 

 

This prequel/spin-off proves there is plenty to explore in this universe and also makes the audience grateful that this horrifying reality is not the one we live in.

 

B+

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Screenshot-20240630-081607.jpg

 

Not in the movie. It's a pity they had to cut Denis O'Hare character 

Was it an exposition dump scene expanding the lore? Oh maybe he played a gay man and the studio decided to make the movie more family friendly)

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Sarnoski explains that weird dining scene 

Quote

"[...] You can see all these sort of pools of this sort of pink, glassy liquid, and if you look closely, you can see that there's bodies in those pools. And the idea is that in the other movies, you kind of get that the creatures take people, and they never really say what they're doing with them. And I think everyone's just like, 'Oh, they're eating the people or something.' But I like the idea that the creatures are kind of leafcutter ants that are sort of farming, using the organic material of people to grow what is their food source, which is these kind of weird melon-y egg, mushroom things that they sort of feed the little ones with."

Read More: https://www.slashfilm.com/1611864/a-quiet-place-day-ones-aliens-eating-egg-scene-explained/

 

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Posted (edited)

I am not the world's biggest Quiet Place fan, I haven't even seen 2, and if it wasn't for Lupita, I wouldn't have cared to see this and she does most of the heavy lifting because I'm with titanic2187; I don't know why Quinn had to be there, but I guess he did fine.

 

I do think some of the sound triggers were a touch inconsistent, but we can chalk that up to aliens simply not being in the area when it happened. Also, I choose to believe that underground train water scene was a callback to what Krasinski said inspired the design of the aliens way back in 2018 (a monologue in Rocknrolla).

 

Also the sound mixing at one point when he read the words in the storm, something about 6 months (which I could guess meant they gave Sam 6 months to live and here she is at the end), part of it was so muffled I couldn't catch all of it.

 

Hounsou and Wolff could have been played by anyone. I didn't even realize which character the latter was until his death scene.

 

The ending got to me though, any time you can make an impact like that - the cut to black, the jumpscare, what it means - you'll get me.

Edited by Morieris
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1 hour ago, Morieris said:

Hounsou and Wolff could have been played by anyone. I didn't even realize which character the latter was until his death scene.

Hounsou's character made a glorified cameo in Part 2. He's the only real connective tissue between this movie and the others.

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20 hours ago, filmlover said:

Hounsou's character made a glorified cameo in Part 2. He's the only real connective tissue between this movie and the others.

 

Ohhhh. Maybe I should give it a try.

 

Overall, it just wasn't as effective in conveying the humanity besides a few scenes than it needed to be for me, but I didn't dislike it.

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Taken from my Letterboxd review:

 

A stellar prequel that goes off in interesting, unexpected directions. Five thoughts:

 

1.) A Quiet Place is already impressive as a franchise in the way that the first two films did so much that ran against conventional wisdom for mainstream horror - like the subtitles, the heavy focus on character development, and relatively limited instances of violence - but Day One takes that genre subversion a step further. It's basically an understated character drama snuck into a mainstream horror movie, and it works. In fact, it's the effectiveness of the character development between Sam and Eric that lends greater tension to the scenes where they try to get past the creatures unscathed - something that could feel a bit rote three movies in without that extra oomph from the emotional investment.

 

2.) Lupita Nyong'o is really good as Sam. It's funny that after it seemed for a while like Hollywood couldn't figure out how to use her outside of voice roles in big movies, she delivers an expressive performance that relies more on gestures and body language than dialogue. It's not on the level of her work in 12 Years a Slave or Us, but it's terrific work that elevates the film.

 

3.) Sam's story is an interesting bit of genre subversion since it basically changes the calculus of a protagonist's typical motivations in this kind of film. Since Sam is already dying, it's not so much death she fears as it is being barred from doing what she really wants - getting that pizza, specifically - before she dies. Having Sam's arc be less about survival and more about self-fulfillment gives the film a different set of stakes and makes it feel more personal and intimate.

 

4.) As is the case in the preceding films in this franchise, the sound design kicks ass. My only quibble with the audio is that I would have liked subtitles for the dialogue - something that was less of an issue in the other films since they had so much ASL that necessitated subtitles in most scenes with dialogue.

 

5.) Frodo the Cat is an absolute champ. 10/10, no notes.

 

B+

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