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riczhang

Riczhang's Year 4 Reviews

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    Right now, I have a lot on my plate, so I won't be able to do every single film, but I'll do requests from everyone. Request as many films as you want (But keep it reasonable :lol: ), and I'll try to get to all of them.

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    You've already got my thoughts on Spark, so I'll bump it to the bottom of the list, unless you really want me to review it before your other two.

    That's all good. The plot is definitely different from the when you first read it, but you can give it a second look when you make your top 25.Main differences-The love triangle is cut out.-Ezen's betrayal and Alex's parents are also cut.-Welan dies slightly differently, and the scene is given more emotion. Edited by Spaghetti
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    Island of the Blue Dolphins:

    Beautifully animated, and emotionally gripping, Island of the Blue Dolphins is a rarity in a genre normally marketed, and catered for the younger demographics. I must confess, that I had doubts going in as to Lee Unkrich’s ability to pull off this animated feature, that is more complex, and darker, and grittier than anything he’s done before. However, Lee has shown that he has the chops to pull this off, and left us with a satisfying story that is Island of the Blue Dolphins.

    The film cost $115 million, and not a cent went to waste, as the water, the animals, and the island were all gorgeously animated. The choice of a slightly more muted colour palate was an excellent one, matching the mood of the story. The voice acting was also great, and the story was unusually deep, and fleshed out for a genre that usually offers up generic kids fare. The story was emotionally satisfying, and the conclusion was particularly good, as it had the perfect amount of hope, and light to counteract the sombre mood that this film held for most of its duration.

    The biggest problem this film had was its rating of PG, I feel that had the film been taken to a PG-13, then there could’ve been so much more they could’ve portrayed, and done with the story, but by deciding to leave it at PG, and at least cater partly to the young audience, the film while excellent failed to reach its full potential, but it’s sombre story also left me wondering if this really is a movie that’s suitable for kids.

    8.5/10

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    The Last Six:

    The Last Six suffers from blunt storytelling, and heavy-handed use of convenient plot points, and dues ex machine, but none of that detracts from the crowd-pleasing, uplifting, action flick that it is. The film has the right amount of lighter moments, particularly at the beginning with the party, and Dionysus, which is a welcome addition to some of the more depressing scenes that come up ahead.

    Technically, the film is impressive, and the work that went into shooting entirely in IMAX (The re-dubbing afterwards, and the inconvenience of shooting) completely pays off, with the crystal clear visuals, that completely draws you into the film. The score, by Michael Giacchino is also quite effective, particularly in the softer moments of the film, but one problem was that at points, the score seemed too loud, and threatened to overwhelm the film, and take on the leading role.

    The acting is superb, with Gordon-Levitt, Renner, and McAvoy being the standouts, and each actor brings something unique to the table, fashioning together a really great ensemble performance.

    However, the story at the beginning was kind of confusing, but pretty quickly everything cleared up, and things got onto track. The climax was a particularly well choreographed scene, however the resolution scene afterwards was disappointing, as the offer of redemption seemed to be not very probable, and felt disjointed. But, then the last scene comes along, and that gets the movie going once again, bringing it to a full and uplifting close.

    7/10

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    Ooohhhh....I get what you're doing now. You're going off everyone and cycling so each film is covered after a while. I assume you're reading The Glass Castle next?

    Yup, review up tonight or tomorrow.
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    The Glass Castle:

    Bleak, Bold, and Beautiful. That’s all that needs to be said about this film that takes us on for the full ride, leaving us reluctant to let go when the credits roll. The biggest problem is the director, Tate Taylor really isn’t the right pick for a film so dark, and desolate, and while he gives it his life’s best shot, it falls short, and at times far short of what it could’ve been.

    The film takes you on a self realising journey that innocence is precious. During the film, when the young Jeanette forgives her parents, over, and over again, the innocence seems infuriating, and I could feel myself wondering when will Jeanette grow up, and do something about it. However, when she finally does, and snaps, you’re left lamenting the loss of such innocence, and melancholic that it didn’t last any longer. As she matures, and in that moment she drives away, I could feel myself crying at the virtue she left behind. This is helped by stellar performances by both Chloe Moretz and her parents, Paul Bettany, and Robin Wright Penn.

    Despite the grievances that the parents inflict on their kids, one can’t help but also feel pity, and sympathy towards their position, and the sacrifices that they’ve had to make to help Jeannette for better or for worse.

    One thing, I felt would’ve made the film flow better would’ve been shifting the first scene to the end, leaving the ending more ambiguous which I felt would’ve been better in the context of the film, rather than a more final ending that is currently in place.

    Overall, emotionally harrowing, and well told, this film is a true gem to be found among the usual August crop of poor thrillers, and rom coms.

    10/10

    Edited by riczhang
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    Nirvana:

    While a return to form for Spielberg from previous disasters, it falls short of the mark left behind by Close Encounters, and E.T., giving way to a film that is an excellent, solid, summer blockbuster, but nothing more. It’s fun, it’s action packed, well executed, decently acted, but really it falls a bit flat on the depth, and emotion.

    The best part of the film for me was the masterful score that Hans Zimmer created, the perfect blend of emotions, instruments, and ideas created the score that supported the film in its ideas, and helped bridge the gap when the film fell short.

    The ending also features a very abrupt change of events, and it feels disjointed, and a cheap attempt by the film makers to resolve into a crowd-pleasing happy ending, instead of letting the events run their course, which would’ve in my opinion created a much more poignant, and impactful ending.

    7/10

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    The Glass Castle:

    9.5/10

    Posted Image

    Thanks for the awesome review.

    However, that ambigous ending wouldn't have really worked for the film. It was based off a memoir, so it has to end in line with Jeannete's actual life.

    Edited by Spaghetti
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