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John Marston

Twister (1996)

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the second highest grossing film of 1996 after Independence Day. It had an opening of $41,059,405 which adjusts to $80,353,800) and finished with 241 million. Which adjusts to an amazing $473,052,300. 

 

 

some interesting things about this film. It had a drop of only 9% second weekend which even for the time was amazing. It was originally supposed to open on May 17, but was pushed up to May 10 to give it another week before Mission Impossible. This probably set the stage for a movie to open the summer movie season by opening before Memorial Day. 
 

It also had a lot of names behind it. Steven Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy producing, Jan De Bont who directed Speed directing, and also being written and produced by author Michael Crichton. So it is not surprise this seemed to be a hyped movie at the time. 

 

 

It also had an uncredited script re write by Joss Whedon

 

 

and was the first movie released on DVD 

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I used to love watching that movie on tv as a kid, I must have watched it literally a dozen times. The visual effects of those twisters were incredible for back then, I remember the first time watching it and just gawking, truly amazing. Nice to see it got a lot of money.

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It's still entertaining, albeit in a very kitschy way. It's a good thing that the film was so tongue-in-cheek because I can't imagine audiences getting anything out of a deadly serious film with clearly-dated CGI effects.

 

Looking back with two decades' worth of hindsight, it's not hard to figure out why it beat the more heavily-hyped Mission: Impossible. It had enormous spectacle and delivered the goods with a breezy, audience-friendly approach, while M:I was too deliberate in its pacing. I'd still take M:I over Twister, but I get why more audiences ended up gravitating toward the latter.

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On 2/10/2017 at 9:11 AM, Webslinger said:

It's still entertaining, albeit in a very kitschy way. It's a good thing that the film was so tongue-in-cheek because I can't imagine audiences getting anything out of a deadly serious film with clearly-dated CGI effects.

 

Looking back with two decades' worth of hindsight, it's not hard to figure out why it beat the more heavily-hyped Mission: Impossible. It had enormous spectacle and delivered the goods with a breezy, audience-friendly approach, while M:I was too deliberate in its pacing. I'd still take M:I over Twister, but I get why more audiences ended up gravitating toward the latter.

 

I would take a slight bit of issue here. I liked both films - saw each twice in the theater that summer - and I remember the marketing. Yes, MI was heavily hyped, but not really any moreso than Twister. Twister had the full backing of Spielberg and WB and was clearly a major tentpole offering. So  my recollection was extensive marketing for both.

 

As for the CGI, Twister and MI were released at a very interesting time. The 1995-1996 time frame saw huge changes in theater presentation, it's when "stadium seating" theaters started to open, and when real deep bass/surround sound in the form of Dolby 5.1, DTS, and SDDS hit the theaters on a widespread basis as well. Those sound formats had been around a couple of years but most chains hadn't retrofitted for them before then. Twister and MI were among that first batch of films to really take advantage of that across the country.

 

 

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This is how a disaster movie should be made.

 

The disaster (the Tornado) is made into a character itself, as each Toronado is different and increasingly destructive and scary. 

 

 

This movie really changed the field of Torando's as it inspired a lot of people to get into Tornado chasing. 

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Jan de Bont’s 1996 “Twister” (Warner Bros.) is more than a cinematic guilty pleasure.  Produced by Steven Spielberg’s Amblin, the tornado-chase thriller shattered box officerecords at the time. The marketing triumph not only influenced the way future trailers were crafted, but much like Marvel’s “Spider-Man” in 2002, “Twister” showed Hollywood  that you could jumpstart the summer season in May.



Warners was trying to get ahead of Paramount’s presumably more competitive new “Mission: Impossible,” starring Tom Cruise. But “Twister” broke out bigger, partly because the earlier May entry gave it a chance to play right through the lucrative Memorial Day holiday. “Twister” signaled that May was just as good a summer launchpad as June, and changed the rules forever.

 

 

https://www.indiewire.com/2020/05/twister-mission-impossible-box-office-summer-movie-marketing-1202230341/

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