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Jake Gittes

Phantom Thread | P.T. Anderson '50s Fashion Drama | Daniel Day-Lewis IS Reynolds Woodcock | Christmas 2017

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Filming just outside Whitby at Lythe Village over the past few days, here is famous actor Daniel Day Lewis filming in The Graveyard at Lythe. The Film crew have been in town since midweek. Filming is expected to continue on The Yorkshire Coast into February with the picturesque village of Staithes next on the list for a visit. Word on the local grapevine is that fishing boats have been hired for Feb in Staithes and some filming will also take part in various cottages on High Street.

 

The film has a budget of some $35 million, and although some websites claim the film is as yet un-named, wording on various vans and signs used in filming are suggesting the film will be called Phantom Thread.

 

The movie, staring Day-Lewis is about the Fashion scenes in 1950’s London. 

 

 

Source: Whitby Photography

 

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Earlier this year, rumors began swirling that Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis were eyeing their first collaboration since 2007’s “There Will Be Blood,” and now the project is official as Focus Features has won a tense bidding war for worldwide distribution rights. Deadline reports the company was in battle with Fox Searchlight for rights to the drama.

 

Further plot details are being kept under wraps for now, as is the acquisition price, though Deadline says it dwarfs the $17.5 million Searchlight paid for Nate Parker’s “The Birth Of A Nation” and even the $20 million they paid for Tom Ford’s “Nocturnal Animals.”

 

With a late 2017 release date planned, expect Focus to have some big Oscar ambitions for the project.

 

 

IndieWire

 

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Lots more behind-the-scenes photos in the first link. 

 

Edited by Jake Gittes
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It kind of amazes me that after the back-to-back flops of The Master and Inherent Vice this movie has a production budget of $35m AND was bought for distribution for more than $20m. Either PTA is in his more mainstream mode on this one or people don't care if they lose money backing him I guess. 

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7 minutes ago, Jake Gittes said:

It kind of amazes me that after the back-to-back flops of The Master and Inherent Vice this movie has a production budget of $35m AND was bought for distribution for more than $20m. Either PTA is in his more mainstream mode on this one or people don't care if they lose money backing him I guess. 

His films may not be profitable, but they bring prestige and critical acclaim to those involved.

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2 hours ago, Jake Gittes said:

It kind of amazes me that after the back-to-back flops of The Master and Inherent Vice this movie has a production budget of $35m AND was bought for distribution for more than $20m. Either PTA is in his more mainstream mode on this one or people don't care if they lose money backing him I guess. 

Perhaps Megan Ellison may be helping out here.

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2 hours ago, Jake Gittes said:

It kind of amazes me that after the back-to-back flops of The Master and Inherent Vice this movie has a production budget of $35m AND was bought for distribution for more than $20m. Either PTA is in his more mainstream mode on this one or people don't care if they lose money backing him I guess. 

As he goes from studio to studio with each new, challenging picture, I think it's pretty obvious that every studio just wants to produce a PTA movie just to say that they have. It's a total abnormality in this current climate, but that's the only logical explanation. His run of films and growth as a filmmaker on a somewhat large scale is pretty much unprecedented and just about unmatched in modern movies (I know there's Tarantino haters out there, but he's the only one that comes close, though on a more populist scale), and even if the mainstream isn't getting it, it warms my heart to see that the respect is there as evidenced by these studios forking money over for movies that might not make it back.

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2 hours ago, The Futurist said:

PTA is becoming more and more autistic in his directorial and artistic choices.

 

Very few people care about his movies anymore.

 

He s loosing the bond that an artist and his audience must have.

 

Can we not use autistic (or any other terms for mental or physical disabilities) as an insult?  Thanks.

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2 hours ago, The Futurist said:

PTA is becoming more and more autistic in his directorial and artistic choices.

 

Very few people care about his movies anymore.

 

He s loosing the bond that an artist and his audience must have.

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16 minutes ago, Jake Gittes said:

I was as ambivalent on The Master after my second viewing as I was after the first. Inherent Vice is bliss tho.

I always find it interesting that there are people who love Inherent Vice but didn't care for The Master. I get that they're two totally different entities, but in my opinion, if anything, Inherent Vice is the more challenging, more opaque work, continuing in the same style as The Master. I am, however, fully open to someone suggesting that any of PTA's (later) films are his best. I love The Master and Inherent Vice and have a feeling that one day, one of those might be most frequently cited as his best film.

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3 minutes ago, LateReg said:

I always find it interesting that there are people who love Inherent Vice but didn't care for The Master. I get that they're two totally different entities, but in my opinion, if anything, Inherent Vice is the more challenging, more opaque work, continuing in the same style as The Master. I am, however, fully open to someone suggesting that any of PTA's (later) films are his best. I love The Master and Inherent Vice and have a feeling that one day, one of those might be most frequently cited as his best film.

 

The Master basically felt to me like it was trying to do way too much and was never quite focused enough, leading to some incredible individual scenes but a frustrating whole. (This was four years ago so there's still a chance I'll see the light). Whereas in Inherent Vice the shagginess became easier to roll with on every additional viewing, because you recognize paranoia and mistrust as a central theme, plus PTA had a fantastic source material as a guide and instead of creating a big story from scratch he actually had to cut things out. Plus its humor and wistful atmosphere and and overall warmth all make it more inviting than The Master. Every time I rewatched it I laughed more and more, sometimes at nothing more than the timing of an edit or at any given line delivery.

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